space travel

Space Selfie - Akihiko Hoshide, JAXA Astronaut - Sep 5, 2012

This is my favourite selfie. It has so many impressive things that make it amazing.

  • First of all it’s in space
  • It showcases the spacesuit in all its glory, tag and lights and all
  • You see the space camera, the Earth, and the ISS all in the reflection on the suit
  • Over the astronaut’s shoulder it is the infinite blackness of space
  • Over the other shoulder is the sun as a light source and the earth as a mirror to focus that light.
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I officially bow down to the artists working at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Also, thanks to NASA for recognizing and celebrating the power of art like this. 

These STUNNING posters can all be downloaded directly from JPL (in hi-res). And their mere existence is reason enough for a new Wednesday theme: World Tour Wednesday. 

Stay tuned for some more awesome posters that are out of this world* and worth touring

- Summer

*too easy?

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“There’s no way to anticipate the emotional impact of leaving your home planet. You look down at Earth and realize: You’re not on it. It’s breathtaking. It’s surreal. It’s a “we’re not in Kansas anymore, Toto” kind of feeling. But I’ve spent a total of 55 days in space, over the course of five missions for NASA, and I’ve learned that being out there isn’t just a series of breathtaking moments. It’s a mix of the transcendently magical and the deeply prosaic. It can be crowded, noisy, and occasionally uncomfortable.”

“It turns out that once you’re actually in orbit, zero-g has some upsides. Without gravity, bodily fluids move toward your head. It’s a great face-lift. Your stomach gets flat. You feel long, because you grow an inch or two.”

“One of the strangest experiences in space is one of the simplest on Earth: sleeping. On the shuttle, you strap your sleeping bag to the wall or the ceiling or the floor, wherever you want, and you get in. It’s like camping. The bag has armholes, so you stick your arms through, reaching outside the bag to zip it up. You tighten the Velcro straps around you to make you feel like you’re tucked in. Then you strap your head to the pillow—a block of foam—with another Velcro strap, to allow your neck to relax. If you don’t tuck your arms into the bag, they drift out in front of you. Sometimes you wake up in the morning to see an arm floating in front of your face and think, “Whoa! What is that?” until you realize it’s yours.”

Astronaut Marsha Ivins on life in space

VIDEO: Man-made leaf produces oxygen and could help us on future long-distance space journeys 

By Ben Hobson -

RCA graduate Julian Melchiorri says the synthetic biological leaf he developed, which absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant, could enable long-distance space travel.

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