space control

Intergalactic Noise Control

Apparently, radio waves broadcast out into space. So what if Earth is the planetary equivalent of that arsehole neighbour blasting shitty music at 3am?
It takes light-years to reach anyone capable of picking it up, but when they do it’s like we’re playing Skrillex, Beethoven, the Wiggles and Metallica simultaneously, at full volume with maximum bass.
Imagine Earth’s first contact being the intergalactic equivalent of Noise Control showing up to make us turn down our damn stereo so the rest of the galaxy can get some sleep.

So unreal to complete my first Mission Control shift!! (With a mentor)

Got to coordinate with people in Alabama and Japan, give one of the ISS GOs for the initial Dragon launch attempt (hopefully all goes well tomorrow!), and send commands to the International Space Station.

I love my job 🌎🚀🎉😍 #foreverfangirling

8

David Bowie references

  1. Oh, You Pretty Things:  Oh, you pretty things. Don’t you know you’re driving your Mamas and Papas insane?…
  2. Rebel, Rebel: You’ve got your transmission and your live wire. You got your cue line and a handful of ludes…
  3. Space Oddity:  Ground Control to Major Tom. Your circuit’s dead, there’s something wrong. Can you hear me, Major Tom?…
  4. Life On Mars?: Take a look at the lawman beating up the wrong guy. Oh man! Wonder if he’ll ever know…
  5. Under Pressure:  It’s the terror of knowing what the world is about. Watching some good friends screaming…
  6. Cat People:  It’s been so long. And I’ve been putting out fire with gasoline
  7. Starman: There’s a starman waiting in the sky. He’d like to come and meet us…

A snippet of a Klance-ish thing that I might be writing right now with like alien mind-control parasite-eque things.

*flings this into the internet and jumps back into my trash bin*

————

“Leave Lance alone. Get the fuck out of him, you piece of—“

Pidge!” He lets out a mocking gasp, a scandalized hand over his chest. “Watch your language, young lady!” Shiro has to hold her back from him by the collar, his eyes steely.

“You heard her.”

“Well, seeing as you asked so nicely—“ He breaks off again, laughing as he ducks to avoid a swing from a fuming Keith. “Okay, now this is just getting irritating. Here, how about I don’t dodge your next blow? Let’s just get this over with. Or you, Pidge, care to use that little bayard of yours on me?”

Silence.

“Go on! Do it! Hurt me, and him along with me. That’s what you’re threatening to do, right?”

Pidge stutters, uncertainty in her gaze.

He smirks. “Exactly. Let’s just end this little charade and acknowledge who’s really in control here, shall we?” He takes a step towards Keith’s blade, smile widening as he pulled it away slightly, the anger on his face being replaced slowly by fear. “I’m as good as untouchable to you in this body, aren’t I, and I’d just hate it if something were to… happen to it.” He traces a fingernail down the veins in Lance’s wrist; Hunk looks sick to his stomach. Lance laughs, throwing his head back in a way that was far too familiar, too friendly, too Lance. Suddenly, he stops, and stares at Shiro like a predator, a dangerous glint in his eyes. “Lovely. Let’s have a talk, shall we, fearless leader?”

2

His mind went back to his younger days, on Tatooine, podracing along wild courses … It amazed Anakin how this little adjustment, dropping into the water instead of smoothly skimming above it, had changed the perspective of this journey. It was true, he knew, that technology had tamed the galaxy, and while that seemed a good thing in terms of efficiency and comfort, he had to believe that something, too, had been lost: the excitement of living on the edge of disaster. Or the simple tactile feeling of a ride like this, bouncing across the waves, feeling the wind and the cold spray.

Five Ways the International Space Station’s National Lab Enables Commercial Research

A growing number of commercial partners use the International Space Station National Lab. With that growth, we will see more discoveries in fundamental and applied research that could improve life on the ground.

Space Station astronaut Kate Rubins was the first person to sequence DNA in microgravity.

Since 2011, when we engaged the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) to manage the International Space Station (ISS) National Lab, CASIS has partnered with academic researchers, other government organizations, startups and major commercial companies to take advantage of the unique microgravity lab. Today, more than 50 percent of CASIS’ experiments on the station represent commercial research.

Here’s a look at five ways the ISS National Lab is enabling new opportunities for commercial research in space.

1. Supporting Commercial Life Sciences Research

One of the main areas of focus for us in the early origins of the space station program was life sciences, and it is still a major priority today. Studying the effects of microgravity on astronauts provides insight into human physiology, and how it evolves or erodes in space. CASIS took this knowledge and began robust outreach to the pharmaceutical community, which could now take advantage of the microgravity environment on the ISS National Lab to develop and enhance therapies for patients on Earth. Companies such as Merck, Eli Lilly & Company, and Novartis have sent several experiments to the station, including investigations aimed at studying diseases such as osteoporosis, and examining ways to enhance drug tablets for increased potency to help patients on Earth. These companies are trailblazers for many other life science companies that are looking at how the ISS National Lab can advance their research efforts.

2. Enabling Commercial Investigations in Material and Physical Sciences

Over the past few years, CASIS and the ISS National Lab also have seen a major push toward material and physical sciences research by companies interested in enhancing their products for consumers. Examples range from Proctor and Gamble’s investigation aimed at increasing the longevity of daily household products, to Milliken’s flame-retardant textile investigation to improve protective clothing for individuals in harm’s way, and companies looking to enhance materials for household appliances. Additionally, CASIS has been working with a variety of companies to improve remote sensing capabilities in order to better monitor our oceans, predict harmful algal blooms, and ultimately, to better understand our planet from a vantage point roughly 250 miles above Earth.

3. Supporting Startup Companies Interested in Microgravity Research 

CASIS has funded a variety of investigations with small startup companies (in particular through seed funding and grant funding from partnerships and funded solicitations) to leverage the ISS National Lab for both research and test-validation model experiments. CASIS and The Boeing Company recently partnered with MassChallenge, the largest startup accelerator in the world, to fund three startup companies to conduct microgravity research.

4. Enabling Validation of Low-Earth Orbit Business Models 

The ISS National Lab helps validate low-Earth orbit business models. Companies such as NanoRacks, Space Tango, Made In Space, Techshot, and Controlled Dynamics either have been funded by CASIS or have sent instruments to the ISS National Lab that the research community can use, and that open new channels for inquiry. This has allowed the companies that operate these facilities to validate their business models, while also building for the future beyond station.

5. Demonstrating the Commercial Value of Space-based Research

We have been a key partner in working with CASIS to demonstrate to American businesses the value of conducting research in space. Through outreach events such as our Destination Station, where representatives from the International Space Station Program Science Office and CASIS select cities with several major companies and meet with the companies to discuss how they could benefit from space-based research. Over the past few years, this outreach has proven to be a terrific example of building awareness on the benefits of microgravity research.

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