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Astronaut Ed White’s Space Walk on Gemini IV, 6/03/1965

During NASA’s Gemini IV mission, Astronaut Edward White II performed the first spacewalk, or Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), by an American fifty years ago on June 3, 1965. 

Gemini IV Mission Image - EVA, off coast of California (photo #5 above):

Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot for the Gemini-Titan 4 space flight,floats in zero gravity of space off the coast of California. The extravehicular activity was performed during the third revolution of the Gemini 4 spacecraft. White is attached to the spacecraft by a 25-ft. umbilical line and a 23-ft. tether line,both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand White carries a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU). The visor of his helmet is gold plated to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. Photo was taken on June 3,1965. G.E.T. time was 4:37 / GMT time was 19:49. Original magazine number was GEM04-16-30427, taken with a Hasselblad camera and a 70mm lens. Film type was Kodak Ektachrome MS (S.O. -217).
National Archives Identifier: 5804872

File unit:  Gemini IV. Series:  Photographs of the Mercury and Gemini Space Programs, 12/1960 - 2/1997. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

From the National Archives Catalog:

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Ed White Performs the First American EVA 50 Years Ago Today (3 June 1965) — Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. White wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft. EDITOR’S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

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Greetings From Mars

Paris based photographer Julien Mauve has created a series of imaginative photos of what the first human photographs would look like on Mars. Julien has always wondered what it would be like to discover a totally different world, lifeless, full of wild landscapes and what it would be like to photograph it for the first time.

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