NGC 6752 

NGC 6752 is the third brightest globular cluster in the night sky, being bested only by Omega Centauri and 47 Tucana. At a visual magnitude of 5.4 it is visible to the naked eye from a dark sky site. It’s roughly 13,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the southern constellation Pavo (The Peacock) and contains well over 100,000 stars within its 100 light-year diameter. Bright red giant stars which dominate this cluster can be seen in the above image. 

Credit: David M. Jurasevich

Variable stars close to the galactic centre

This image, captured with the VISTA infrared survey telescope, as part of the Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) ESO public survey, shows the central part of the Milky Way. While normally hidden behind obscuring dust, the infrared capabilities of VISTA allow to study the stars close to the galactic centre. 

Within this field of view astronomers detected several ancient stars, of a type known as RR Lyrae. As RR Lyrae stars typically reside in ancient stellar populations over 10 billion years old, this discovery suggests that the bulging centre of the Milky Way likely grew through the merging of primordial star clusters.

Credit: ESO/VVV Survey/D. Minniti

The Lanzhou screw is a mysterious object discovered in recent years that seems to challenge mainstream archaeology and history. It was discovered in 2002, and has since then, generated great amount of attention among researchers. The most mysterious part of this object is that, within a piece of rock, a metal screw was discovered. The mysterious pear-shaped stone is about 6×8 cm and weighs around 466 grams. But it is not a common rock and the metal shaped screw inside just adds to the mystery of a rock, that according to researchers is around 300 million years old.

The mysterious black rock has geologists scratching their head. Tests have failed to show the exact composition of the mysterious rock, researchers that include geologists and physicists from the National Land Resources Bureau of Gansu Province, Colored Metal Survey Bureau of Gansu Province, the Institute of Geology and Minerals Research of China Academy, Lanzhou Branch, and the School of Resources and Environment of Lanzhou College, are unsure of the origin of the artifact and point out that at this time, all theories are possible.

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