soviet guns

PPSh-41 submachine gun

Designed by Georgi Shpagin in the USSR c.1941 and manufactured in large quantities well into the 1960′s.
7,62x25mm Tokarev 71-round drum magazine or 35-round stick magazine, blowback select fire with selector switch located in front of the trigger.

With 6 million guns rolling out during WW2, the PPSh-41 smg was one of the work horses of the Soviet Union infantry.

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The soviet GUV-8700 Gun Pod (9A624), which packs two GShG-7.62 gatling machine guns, and a Yak-B 12.7mm gatling heavy machine gun.

Such configuration is possible as both types of machine guns are gas operated, rather than the more usual electric motor, which makes them far more lighter and compact. 

For helicopter use, both attack and transport. 

WWII Firearms in Iraq Part 2

Part 1 // Part 3

In the 2003 invasion of Iraq and subsequent occupation by American forces, history wormed its way into the hands of insurgents, who used whatever weapons they could lay hands on to fight the invaders. It was not uncommon to find firearms better suited for the museum than the battlefield.

PPSh-41. The Soviet Union’s primary submachine gun of World War II. With a rate of fire up to 1000 rpm, the PPSh gave Soviet soldiers volumes of firepower that German soldiers couldn’t compete with. Some six million PPSh’s were manufactured by the USSR between 1941-1947, and China made several million more, making the PPSh one of the world’s most produced firearms. No wonder it can be found in most conflicts.

TACTICAL.

With 1000 rpm, you can really saturate a room.

SQUAD UP.

StG-44. The world’s first assault rifle, the Stg-44 was the pinnacle of German firearms technology at the time. The StG-44 had a rocky start, firearms designers forced to call it a submachine gun in order to thwart Hitler, who did not care for the kurz bullet concept and only wanted more SMGs. However, when Hitler finally saw the StG-44 in action (under the guise of MP44) he gave his consent for its full manufacture and christened it the “Sturmgewehr:” storm rifle. Although the StG-44 could not turn the tide of battle, it was the basis for every combat rifle today.

This could be in 1991 or 2003. 

Photographic quality was kind of in a nebulous area around those time periods.

MG42. A true general purpose machine gun, the MG42 was one of the outstanding weapons of the war, with proven reliability, durability, simplicity and ease of manufacture. To this day the MG42 sees service as the MG3, and is virtually unchanged.

MG42 with a M1919, RPK, SG-43 and PPSh.

MP40. Of course.

Wz. 35. If I’m not mistaken, this is THE Wz. 35; a Polish anti-tank rifle that was so secret that until mobilization in 1939, the combat-ready rifles were held in closed crates enigmatically marked: “Do not open! Surveillance equipment!” Unlike other anti-materiel rifles of the time, the Wz. 35 did not use an armor-piercing bullet with a hard core, but rather a lead core, full metal jacket bullet. Due to the high muzzle velocity this was effective even under shallow angles, as instead of ricocheting, the bullet would “stick” to the armor and punch a roughly 20 mm diameter hole.

Less than 10 examples of the Wz. 35 still exist, making this an extremely rare and valuable firearm to both collectors and museums.

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Avtomaticheskiy Pistolet Stechkina

Designed by Igor Stechkin c.1949-51, manufactured c.1954 in the USSR.
9x18mm Makarov 20-round removable box magazine, blowback select fire, removable holster stock.

The creation of the AK line of assault rifles made PPSh and PPS submachine guns obsolete in only a few years, which prompted Soviet tank, artillery and mortar crews to be issued instead with this new generation of pistol-caliber automatic firearms.

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Quad-mounted soviet PM M1910 Maxim machine guns - ZPU 4

Manufactured between 1910 and 1945 in Russia or the USSR, here used in an anti-aircraft role c.1941.
7,62x54mmR, 250 rounds belt-fed, short recoil, toggle locked and water-cooled. 1931 configuration.

Protect the Motherland with an overpowering display of antiquated firearms.