southern pakistan

Suicide bombing at Pakistan shrine

A brutal attack on a beloved Sufi shrine that killed 88 people raised fears that the Islamic State group has become emboldened in Pakistan, aided by an army of homegrown militants benefiting from hideouts in neighboring Afghanistan, analysts and officials said Friday.

Pakistani security forces have carried out sweeping country-wide raids following Thursday’s bombing of the shrine in Pakistan’s southern Sindh province that also wounded 343 people. The military’s public relations wing reported on its official twitter account that more than 100 suspected ‘terrorists” were killed in the raids, while government officials lashed out at Kabul accusing the Afghan government of ignoring earlier pleas to crackdown on militant hideouts. (AP)

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A man mourns the death of a relative who was killed in a suicide blast at the tomb of Sufi saint Syed Usman Marwandi, also known as the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine, on Thursday evening in Sehwan Sharif, Pakistan’s southern Sindh province, February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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Policemen gather after an angry mob set ablaze a police van along a road in a protest following Thursday’s suicide blast at the tomb of Sufi saint Syed Usman Marwandi, also known as the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine, in Sehwan Sharif, Pakistan’s southern Sindh province, February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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Pakistani para-military soldiers stand alert after a deadly suicide attack at the shrine of famous Sufi Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in Sehwan, Pakistan, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. An Islamic State suicide bomber targeted worshippers at a famous shrine in southern Pakistan on Thursday, killing dozens of worshippers and left hundreds of people wounded, officials said. (AP Photo/Pervez Masih)

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A Pakistani policeman stands guard as devotees arrive at The Tomb of 13th century Sufi saint Shah Rukn-e-Alam in Multan on February 17, 2017, following bomb attack on a shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi. (Photo credit should read SS MIRZA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Pakistani mourners carry the coffin of a blast victim during his funeral in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi on February 17, 2017, after a bomb blew up in the shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar.(Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

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A Pakistani woman, whose relatives were killed, is being comforted by scouts a day after it was hit a suicide attack at the 13th century old shrine of a Muslim saint, in the town of Sehwan, in southern Sindh province in Pakistan on February 17, 2017. A Daesh terrorist organization related suicide bomber blew himself up among devotees in the shrine of Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in Sehwan, some 200 kilometres northeast of Karachi, killing 70 people and wounding 150 others. (Photo by Shakeel Ahmed/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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Pakistani mourners attend the funeral prayers for the blast victims in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi on February 17, 2017, after a bomb blew up in the shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar. Pakistan launched a crackdown February 17 after a bomb killed 70 people at a crowded Sufi shrine, officials said, the deadliest in a wave of attacks that analysts said suggested militants could be regrouping. The Islamic State group (IS) has claimed the attack, which came after a series of bloody extremist assaults this week, including a powerful Taliban suicide bomb in the eastern city of Lahore which killed 13 people and wounded dozens. The attacks have dented growing optimism in security after Pakistan’s decade-long war on militancy. (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

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Pakistani mourners carry the coffin of a blast victim during his funeral in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi on February 17, 2017, after a bomb blew up in the shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar. Pakistan launched a crackdown February 17 after a bomb killed 70 people at a crowded Sufi shrine, officials said, the deadliest in a wave of attacks that analysts said suggested militants could be regrouping. The Islamic State group (IS) has claimed the attack, which came after a series of bloody extremist assaults this week, including a powerful Taliban suicide bomb in the eastern city of Lahore which killed 13 people and wounded dozens. The attacks have dented growing optimism in security after Pakistan’s decade-long war on militancy. (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

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Pakistani volunteers carry the dead body of an alleged militant killed in a crackdown operation by security forces to a mortuary in Karachi, Pakistan, Friday, Feb. 17, 2017. Pakistani security forces arrested dozens of suspects in sweeping raids a day after a massive bombing claimed by the Islamic State group killed dozens of worshippers at a famed Sufi shrine in a southern province. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

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Slippers and a baby feeder of blast victims lie on the ground at the 13th century Muslim Sufi shrine of Lal Shahbaz Qalandar a day after a bomb attack in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres northeast of the provincial capital Karachi, on February 17, 2017. Pakistan launched a nationwide security crackdown Friday, officials said, after a bomb ripped through a crowded Sufi shrine, killing at least 70 people including 20 children and wounding hundreds. (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)

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Pakistani volunteers carry the body of a suspected militant killed in a overnight raid on their hideouts by security forces, at a hospital in Karachi on February 17, 2017, following the bomb attack on the shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province. (Photo credit should read RIZWAN TABASSUM/AFP/Getty Images)

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A Pakistani police officer stands guard outside the Barri Imam shrine, as security is beefed up in the capital following a suicide attack at a Sufi shrine in interior Sindh, Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Feb. 17, 2017. Pakistani forces killed and arrested dozens of suspects in sweeping raids overnight and into Friday, a day after a massive suicide bombing by the Islamic State group killed 85 worshippers at a famed Sufi shrine in the country’s south. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

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Pakistani students pray for victims of Thursday’s suicide bombing at the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine, Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 in Karachi, Pakistan. Pakistani security forces arrested dozens of suspects in sweeping raids a day after the massive bombing claimed by the Islamic State group killed dozens of worshippers at the famed Sufi shrine in a southern province. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

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A Pakistani policeman stands guard as Muslim offer Friday prayers on a street in Peshawar on February 17, 2017, following bomb attack on a shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi. (Photo credit should read ABDUL MAJEED/AFP/Getty Images)

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Men comfort each other as they attend the funeral of a relative who was killed in a suicide blast at the tomb of Sufi saint Syed Usman Marwandi, also known as the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine, in Sehwan Sharif, Pakistan’s southern Sindh province, February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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Men and relatives gather to attend funeral prayers for victims killed in a suicide blast at the tomb of Sufi saint Syed Usman Marwandi, also known as the Lal Shahbaz Qalandar shrine, during a funeral in Sehwan Sharif, Pakistan’s southern Sindh province, February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

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A Pakistani policeman stands guard as Muslims offer Friday prayers on a street in Karachi on February 17, 2017, following bomb attack on a shrine of 13th century Muslim Sufi saint Lal Shahbaz Qalandar in the town of Sehwan in Sindh province, some 200 kilometres north-east of the provincial capital Karachi. (Photo credit should read RIZWAN TABASSUM/AFP/Getty Images)

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The Indian Roofed Turtle (Pangshura tecta) occupies the drainages of the Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra Rivers, from Pakistan to Bangladesh. Isolated populations occur in southern Pakistan and in west-central India. This species is collected for consumption as food and for sale on the international pet market. 

PAKISTAN, Karachi : A Pakistani resident helps a heatstroke victim at a market area during a heatwave in Karachi on June 23, 2015. The death toll from a heatwave in southern Pakistan on June 23 passed 450 as medics battled to treat victims after imposing a state of emergency in hospitals, health officials said. AFP PHOTO / Rizwan TABASSUM                        

RESUP

A Marine Corps Super Stallion helicopter from VMM-266 (REIN), 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, flies in route to deliver relief supplies during humanitarian assistance operations in the southern province of Sindh, Pakistan. Photo by Capt. Paul Duncan.

A tiger cools off with a block of ice at Karachi Zoo in Pakistan. 

Caretakers at Karachi’s zoo were working to keep animals cool during a deadly heatwave affecting southern Pakistan. The human toll from four days of sweltering conditions had risen to more than 800 by Wednesday, with some 4,000 people being treated at hospitals for heat stroke.

Picture: EPA/SHAHZAIB AKBER