southern guy

I love how Avatar makes the nonbenders just as cool and powerful. It’s like saying “hey you don’t have these cool powers but you can still be like these awesome characters” Korra fell in love with a nonbender. The fire lord fell in love with a nonbender. The self proclaimed greatest earthbender of all time had a crush on a nonbender. Some people argue that the fire princess fell in love with a nonbender. The avatars son was (for most of his life) a nonbender. The two greatest warriors to come out of the water tribe were nonbenders. The universes greatest bounty hunter was a nonbender. The fire princess chose two nonbenders for her small elite team. Two thirds of the gaang were nonbenders. I just think it’s really cool.

7

Selfish Machines is the second studio album by American rock band Pierce the Veil, released by Equal Vision on June 22, 2010.   Produced by Vic Fuentes and Mike Green, it was recorded between late 2009 and early 2010.  


(read tags)

8

Iroh and Mai setting boundaries on what is and isn’t acceptable behavior. 

I found a gif with this on it and I almost started crying. Countdown to the Comet was when Nicktoons ran every episode for three days. I remember watching this. I remember being eight years old and waiting for this. I remember the countdown ticking down to five minutes. I remember seeing Zuko and Iroh’s reunion for the first time and my mom trying to hide the fact that she was crying. This brought up so many emotions because it put me back at an almost exact time. I can’t tell you how much I want to watch this like this again. Not knowing how Aang will master the elements, learning along with Zuko about the White Lotus, being flabbergasted at who Bumi really was, hanging off the edge of my seat when you hear Jet’s voice on the ferry, not knowing that Pakku and Kanna were in love, wondering how Zuko got his scar, watching Katara take down Hama, realizing who Suki was at the same time as Sokka on the docks, watching Zuko’s redemption arc, meeting Toph, watching Katara’s power grow, learning about Kya and Lu Ten, not knowing what black snow means, hating book one Zuko. Rewatching this reminds me how many great moments and plot twists and cliff hangers I’ll never get to experience again. I want to fall in love with it again.

How to Write Successful Dialogue

@albino-troll-ninja asked:

Got any feedback/advice/links for someone who wants to make lengthy, relatively action-less dialogues between characters more than just “‘Loren ipsum,’ he said.” “'Ipsum lorem’, she replied.” for forty paragraphs?

No problem!  I love dialogue, so I’m happy to be of assistance in this department.  

Here are my personal rules of thumb:

1.  Allow the dialogue to show the character’s personality.

If you really think about your conversations, it can be telling exactly how much of someone’s personality can shine through when they speak.  

Allow your character’s persona, values, and disposition to spill over when they speak, and it will make for a significantly more interesting read for you and your reader. 

For example:  let’s take a look at a mundane exchange, and see how it can be spruced up by injecting it with a good dose of personality.

Exhibit A)

“How was your day, by the way?”  asked Oscar, pouring himself a drink.

“Not too bad,” replied Byron.  “Cloudy, but warm.  Not too many people.”

“That’s nice.”   

Exhibit B) 

“How was your day, by the way?” asked Oscar, pouring himself a drink. 

“Ugh.  Not too bad,” groaned Byron, draping himself on the couch.  “Warm, but dreary.  Gray clouds as far as the eye could see.  Not anyone worth mentioning out this time of year.”  A pause.  “Well, except me, of course.”

“Hmmph,” said Oscar, glancing over his shoulder.  “If it were me, I wouldn’t want it any other way.”

Isn’t that better?  Already, the audience will feel as though they’ve gotten to know these characters. 

This works for longer dialogue, too:  allow the character’s personal beliefs, life philosophy, and generally disposition to dictate how they talk, and your readers will thank you.

Of course, this example is also good for giving the reader a general sense of what the characters’ relationship is like.  Which brings me to my next point:

2.  Allow the dialogue to show the character’s relationship. 

Everyone is a slightly different person depending on who they’re around.  Dynamic is an important thing to master, and when you nail it between two characters, sparks can fly.

Work out which character assumes more of the Straight Man role, and which is quicker to go for lowbrow humor.  Think of who’s the more analytical of the two and who’s the more impulse driven.  Who would be the “bad cop” if the situation called for it.  

Then, allow for this to show in your dialogue, and it will immediately become infinitely more entertaining.

Example:  

“Alright,” said Fogg, examining the map before him.  “Thus far, we’ve worked out how we’re going to get in through the ventilation system, and meet up in the office above the volt.  Then, we’re cleared to start drilling.”

Passepartout grinned.  “That’s what she said.” 

“Oh, for the love of God – REALLY, Jean.  Really!?  We are PLANNING a goddamn bank robbery!”

Some more questions about dynamic to ask yourself before writing dialogue: 

  • Who is more likely to talk and who is more likely to listen? 
  • Who would talk with their mouth full of food and who would politely wait to swallow?
  • Is their relationship fraternal/sororal?  If so, who would be the “little sibling?”
  • Is one of them a bit of a mother/father figure to the other? 
  • Who more frequently gets irritated with who?
  • Who has the more understated sense of humor?  Who’s a bit more juvenile?
  • Who’s better educated?  Does it show when they speak?
  • Who’s a bit more pretentious/full of themselves?
  • Who interrupts more?
  • Who swears more?

This can also be a valuable tool to cluing your reader in on who the characters are as people: 

3.  Think about what this dialogue can tell the reader.

It’s better to fill the reader in more gradually than to waist your valuable first chapter on needless exposition, and dialogue is a great way to do it.  

Think about what your characters are saying, and think about ways in which you can “sneak in” details about their past, their families, and where they came from into the discussion.  

For example, you could say:

Tuckerfield was a happy-go-lucky Southern guy with domineering parents,

and bore everyone to death.  

Or you could have him say: 

“Sheesh.  All this sneakin’ around in the woods late at night reminds me of being back in Kansas.  Good times, man, good times.”  There was a pause, before he added,  “‘Course, it wasn’t nearly so fun when I came home late for curfew and had to sleep on the front step, but y’know.  Life happens.”

Isn’t that much better than the omnipresent monotone?

Dialogue is also a great way to fill in potential plot holes early on, by having your characters talk them out and explain them. 

Moreover, dialogue can also be used to foreshadow, offer relevant hints about the climax, or provide information necessary for the resolution.  

So use it wisely!  

4.  Sprinkle in mini-actions throughout. 

Even in actionless dialogue, no one actually does nothing.  In my case, for example, I stim a lot.  I play with my hair.  I play with eating utensils.  It’s probably very annoying for those around me, but you get the point.

Less fidget-y folks might not do this as much, but they rarely sit totally still during conversations, either.  So occasionally add in these mini-actions, and it will make your characters feel a bit less like disembodied voices or floating heads.

For instance:  

Jo leaned back in her chair rolling her stiff neck from sitting still for so long.  “…So the way I see it,” she continued.  “Even if Pheris Beuller’s Day Off didn’t take place in Cameron’s imagination, Pheris was clearly a sociopath whose behavior shouldn’t be glamorized.”

“Ha.  As if.”  Avery paused to sip her root beer.  “Pheris,” she began, raising an index finger.  “Was clearly emblematic of counterculturist movements such as the Beat Generation, and his disregard for the capitalistic dogmas imposed upon younger generations is something to be admired.” 

“For Christ’s sake, will you two lighten up?”  scoffed Leo, counting out bills for the pizza.  “We were talking about which movie we wanted to watch tonight.  Jesus.”

5.  Remember how people actually speak.

In real life conversations, people don’t speak in paragraphs.  Alright, some people might, and this can actually be interesting as the personality aspect of a certain type of character.  

But generally speaking, people don’t speak in paragraphs, or as though they’re writing thought-out prose or letters.

In real conversations, people stutter.  They laugh at their own jokes, repeat words or phrases, and lose their train of thought.

Naturally, you don’t have to illustrate in your writing exactly how chaotic and mundane human speech can be, as writing would be pretty boring in general if it was strictly limited to miming reality.  But it’s good to keep in mind that your characters are talking, not writing in purple prose.

Exhibit A: 

“When I was a young boy, my mother and I had a most tumultuous relationship,” said Marcus.  “She saw me as a hallmark of her past failures, and took every opportunity to remind me as such.”     

Exhibit B:

“My mom, when I was kid, we had what you’d call a sort of tumultuous relationship,” said Marcus.  “Nothing I ever did was right for her.  She, uh – I think she saw me as sort of a hallmark of her past failures.  Took every opportunity to remind me of that.”    

Which of these is more organic, more easy to visualize, and more telling of character?  Unless the point of this dialogue is to illustrate that Marcus is a gentleman crook of some kind with pristine speaking mannerisms, I’m going to say the latter. 


Best of luck, I hope this helps, and happy writing!  <3

Give me stories where people don’t doubt that Bitty is on the hockey team because of his stature, but because he isn’t an obnoxious, loud-mouthed, overly-opinionated rUDE PERSON, YES YOU ADAM BIRKHOLTZ AND WILLIAM POINDEXTER I AM POINTING AT YOU

Jon Snow

Originally posted by rovlaju

Me  @ hearing the blasted leaks. 

so I finally watched Logan (spoilers)
  • ok first things first this was one of the best movies I’ve ever watched
  • the visuals were absolutely on fleek
  • old and confused Professsor X ripped my heart out
  • also i liked the southern villain guy 
  • LOVED sassy badass not speaking kid aka laura aka X23
  • the dinner with the farmer family was so bEAUTIFUL
  • “I ran a school for kids with special needs” - literally the entire theater was losing their shit laughing
  • when laura kept the kids ipod aah
  • logan wanting to die bcs of guilt noo
  • charles xavier died thinking logan killed him
  • there was not enough time to mourn charles
  • also caliban sacrificed himself 
  • the kids were amazingly portrayed without making it cheesy
  • them shaving his beard was so funny
  • like generally this was a surprisingly funny movie
  • was the leader of the kids group magnetos son or something? metal powers just saying
  • the camera technique they used in the woods scene was BEAUTIFUL
  • logan and laura fighting alongside each other was everything i ever wanted
  • the X at the end i was a 100% sobbing mess
  • I DID NOT EXPECT THAT MANY DEATHS
Hold On, I’m Coming (Part 2)

Originally posted by yourfavoritedirector

Summary: you and Dean have your first date

Pairing: Firefighter!Dean x Reader

Word Count: 2,400

Warnings: language, mention of injuries, mention of stitches

A/N: You guys want more - you got it! Hope you like it, and there will be at least a few more parts that I’ve got planned. Beta and general life credit to my twin @deanssweetheart23 for reading everything and putting up with me

Check out the Series Masterlist

Keep reading

*slams fist*

ED EDGAR HEADCANONS LET’S GO

-Grew up on a ranch

-inherited the family business so he grew to be a businessman

-He’s a SHREWD one. Always looking to make deals, raising the stakes, knowing when to back off. Makes him an excellent Gambler still can’t sell babies for shit but when he switched specialty wOW

-if Egos INC. really WAS a corporation, he would be the one running it. Not Wilford, not Dark, but Ed Edgar. besides those two don’t know jack about running a company

-He’s pretty much a tough southern guy in terms of personality. He’s strong, got a good hand in taking care of animals, and is used to sweat jobs.

-OH MY GOD THE HORSES. Well, he only owns one, but when he was looking for a horse to be his mate, aLL OF THE HORSES THAT HE WENT UP TO LOVED HIM. They were all crushed when they weren’t chosen. @alcordraws I challenge you to find a horse for him

-legiT GOD AT HORSERACING

-goes into town on a horse. No car. Everyone stares at him, but he just looks so goddamN GOOD

-keeps the fireplace going at home. Everyone won’t admit it, but they love it

-totally in his element out in the fields and woods.

-uses the whip

-in contrast to the Host’s warmer/moving, bittersweet and feels-y violin playing style, Ed Edgar’s got the soUTHERN FIDDLE IN HIS BLOOD. Ex: hoedown from rodeo by Copland

-uses waaaayyy too many cute nicknames when addressing people, ESPECIALLY when he’s trying to be charming. Ex: darlin’, honey, sugar cube, brother, haystack, etc etc

-independent and alone to a fault

-wilford likes him (he’s fun). 

-Ed feels alienated by the Googles (did I forget to mention he’s not exactly in-tune with technology?)

-Dark feels repulsed by him. The Host is not fond of his energy

-Dr. Iplier has to constantly check up on him since he has like absolutely no sense of self-care. Gotta make sure he’s eating right, treating himself right and not injuring himself, etc etc

-probably knows a thing or two about raising crops/plants. maybe why Bim is okay with him

-makes killer lemonade and iced tea

-tips his hat at people he likes and respects

@markired @artist-in-space