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Princess Leia Tribute Parade 

Krewe of Chewbacchus

New Orleans

Photo Credits: @smellcircus | @drmorgus | @nolanews | @austenbailly | @tas1962 

washingtonpost.com
His Paula Deen takedown went viral. But this food scholar isn’t done yet.
Michael Twitty’s mission: To evangelize about the African roots of Southern food.

Wow this guy is amazing uhhhhhh uhhhhhh such awesome work

-blogger at Afroculinaria.com

“Twitty is deeply engrossed in both the African American and Jewish food traditions. “Blacks and Jews are the only peoples I know who use food to talk about their past while they eat it,” says Twitty, 38.”

“From Richmond it was a short jaunt to Colonial Williamsburg, where Twitty spent the week lecturing, conducting training sessions and cooking in period costume at three of the living history museum’s venues. In all his talks, Twitty emphasized the impact of chefs and cooks of African descent on shaping American and Southern cuisines in colonial times and after.”

“At a conference he met the scholar Robert Farris Thompson, author of “Flash of the Spirit,” a book about the influence of African religions on African American art that helped him see that “soul food” was, among other things, a spiritual term describing a mystical connection between humans and the animals and plants they eat.”

“He cooked and he gardened. He studied heirloom seed varieties, some that had been brought from Africa and some that had been carried from the New World to Africa and then, on slave ships, back to North America, among them okra, black-eyed peas, kidney and lima beans, Scotch bonnet peppers, peanuts, millet, sorghum, watermelon, yams and sesame. He called those seeds “the repositories of our history” and wrote about them in a monograph published by Landreth Seed in its 2009 catalogue.”

“Twitty’s embrace of all the various parts of himself — African, African American, European, black, white, gay, Jewish — sometimes raises hackles, as does his habit of speaking his mind. An article he wrote in the Guardian on July 4, 2015, suggesting that American barbecue “is as African as it is Native American and European, though enslaved Africans have largely been erased” from its story, elicited scorn and worse: Many commenters were outraged by his idea of barbecue as cultural appropriation.”

au where everything’s the same except Remus talks like an old southern woman.

“Y'all please”

“Harry, Harry… Bless your heart”

“Severus, I swear to the Lord, if you don’t shut your trap this instant, I’ll stick a sock in in for you”

*puts hands over Harry’s ears* “Little ears, you silly fucking asshat”

“Well, Harry, back when I was a boy”

*something happens* “Well, I never”

And who could forget:

“Sirius Black… Well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit”

i have had the unfortunate opportunity to grow up in a part of the south, and i heard pretty much all of these things at some point in my life. i’m not exaggerating. feel free to add.

Winter In The South

The weatherman predicts 4 to 8 inches of snow. You are hesitant to believe it, but deep within your soul an urge of unknown origin begins. You must buy bread and milk. You have no idea why, but something ancestral is pushing you. When you arrive at the grocery store, the bread and milk are in short supply. As you reach the line, every cart is filled with bread and milk. What are they going to do with it? What are you going to do with it? You dare not guess, but pay for your 3 loaves and 3 gallons all the same and hope it lasts through the storm.

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Louisiana seafood

Photo Credits: @hollyhoodkold | @southernlivingmag | @deaniesseafood | @noburgerandseafood | @nolafoodandtravel | @nolamaven | @diariesofafatty |  @nolafreshseafood | @grandbabycakes​