south indian problems

4

Cultural Appropriation is a real, important, and harmful thing, but god damn if it’s not one of the most recklessly abused terms in the social justice lexicon.

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I’m from Kanyakumari. As in the extreme Southern tip of India. As in Kashmir tu, main Kanyakumari. But my parents lived in North India for ages while dad worked there. As a result, I learnt to speak hindi and tamil. I grew up watching bollywood, shipping Sharukh-Kajol, eating pani puri, and having a large circle of North Indian friends. I am so often asked, ‘don’t you just wish you were fully North Indian? It’s so much better! And you fit right in!’ As well as other general comments of superiority and such. The answer is no. I still love the paddy fields of Tamil Nadu, the beaches of Kanyakumari. I still have a crush on Vijay, and nothing will ever taste as good as my Amma’s dosai. Of course I would be lying if I were to say that the attitude of Tamilians wasn’t the same. I love both cultures. My parents brought me up like this to be broad-minded. I hate the discrimination between groups of Indians. It’s ridiculous. We have so many cultures within our land and they are all beautiful. Indians are quick to call out white people, but we can’t even maintain peace and equality in our little world within India. Because to be a patriot, you need to love all of our desh.

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I don’t think I’ve ever said I love you to my dad. He’s never said it either, but I know that it’s there. This has never bothered me though, because his way of saying “I love you” is more like “Drive home safe”, “Go get some sleep, you look tired”, or “Did you eat anything? I’ll go pickup some food”. I think that’s just a part of Indian culture, they don’t say these endearing words but they’d do anything in the world for us. They move to a different country and work hard just for their kids. Our parents are so self-sacrificing and so selfless. That’s what love is. I don’t need to hear it (although I’ll admit, it would make my day), but I know it’s there and that’s good enough for me :)

5

DESI FASHION 101

OKAY LISTEN FOR A SEC

EVERY DESI WOMEN’S OUTFIT IS NOT A GOD DAMN SARI!

IS YOUR MIND BLOWN YET?

NO?

GOOD. BECAUSE YOU ARE ABOUT TO LEARN THE NAME OF ALL THE MAIN THINGS WE WEAR (they may have different names based on the region)

THAT FIRST ONE? THAT IS A SARI. THE THING YOU THINK WE ALWAYS WEAR. BASICALLY IT’S A 5 YARD (OR 9 YARD) LONG PIECE OF FABRIC WE WRAP AROUND OURSELVES AND IT CAN BE A PAIN IN THE ASS TO KEEP INTACT BUT IT’S OKAY BECAUSE IT’S PRETTY

THE SECOND ONE? IT’S EITHER A LEHENGA OR GHAGRA CHOLI. EVEN I CAN’T TELL THE DIFFERENCE. THEY ARE BOTH A BLOUSE WITH A LONG SKIRT TECHNICALLY. THE GHAGRA IS USUALLY LOOSER THAN THE LEHENGA (THOSE TERMS REFER TO THE SKIRT)

THE THIRD ONE IS AN ANARKALI SUIT. SUPER LONG SHIRT-DRESS WITH “LEGGINGS.” MY PERSONAL FAVE TBH

THE FOURTH: A CHURIDAR SUIT. SIMILAR TO AN ANARKALI EXCEPT THE TOP ONLY GOES DOWN TO LIKE THE KNEES

THAT LAST ONE? THAT IS A PATIALA SALWAR KAMEEEZ. LONG-ISH SHIRT WITH, WHAT YOU NON DESI FOLK WOULD CALL, “PARACHUTE PANTS”

THERE ARE A BUNCH OF OTHER TYPES BUT THESE ARE THE ONES I AM FAMILIAR WITH. FEEL FREE TO ADD ON.

~~**THE MORE YOU KNOW**~~