source-on-click-through

anonymous asked:

hello! do you have any advice for growing your studyblr? I have been running once since a year and I can't seem to grow and it just makes me sad because that means I can't reach out to more people. Thank you emma, your blog is adorable :)

Hey! Thank you so much, you’re very kind! A few things you could try include:

  • have a user-friendly theme - my pet peeve is themes! I always like mine to look pretty, be functional and free from glitches. Make sure your followers can see everything clearly, navigate through your posts quickly and there was clear links to all your pages. My favourite theme makers include @modernisethemes , @neonbikethemes, @acuite , @pohroro, @magnusthemes, and @bychloethemes.
  • make an introductory post - even though you’ve had your blog for a while, you can still make one! These are super cute in the studyblr community and people love to find new blogs and read a little about someone. Tag your favourite blogs or your most inspirational blogs and hope they’ll see it and reblog it too!
  • upload your own tips/advice posts - people (me included) looooove reading how people stay motivated, their study advice or organisation tips so share those!
  • use popular tags - this includes #studyblr, #studyspo, #student, #studying, etc. This can help give your post a little bit of extra exposure. Tag some of the urls of your favourite blogs. For instance, if you tag a post with #emmastudies I’ll see it and reblog it!
  • join studyblr networks - I’ve seen a few of these pop up around and about so if you see one, join in! It is also a great way to make friends and get some mutual followers!
  • use a queue - if you use the queue option you don’t need to be on Tumblr 24/7 and that means you can still have an active blog when you’re not around. If you’re having an off-Tumblr day or week, it doesn’t matter because you’ll still be seemingly online!
  • if you upload your own content, have a ‘mine’ or ‘original content’ tag on your blog - this might encourage people to click and therefore reblog your own posts.
  • remember to source and click-through your posts - this gives yourself credit as the owner and shows a link to your blog whenever the photo appears on a blog or the dashboard!
  • watermark them - if you can, add a little watermark (like your url) to the photos. That way if they get reblogged or anyone reposts them without you knowing, they’ll still be credit to you which might drive traffic back to your blog.
  • message other people - don’t be afraid to send someone a message! Get to know them, make a friend! If someone does an ask game (like sleepover Saturday), join in! 

Hope this helps x

How to spot fake news

From NPR:

First, take a moment. If you have time to scroll Facebook or watch the news, you probably have a moment to decide if a news story seems credible. Ask some quick questions:

Is the story so outrageous you can’t believe it? Maybe you shouldn’t. Respect the voice inside you that says, “What?”

Is the story so outrageous you do believe it? That’s also a warning sign. Many stories play on your existing beliefs. If the story perfectly confirms your worst suspicions, look for more information.

Does the headline match the article? Many compelling headlines don’t.

Does the article match the news story it’s lifted from? Many sites rewrite other news articles to fit the political slant of their presumed audience. Look for links to original sources and click through and see what the original says.

Are quotes in context? Look for the sentences before and after the quote that makes your blood boil. If the article fails to give them, that’s a warning sign.

Is the story set in the future? It’s hard to get firsthand reporting from there. Any story that tells you what will happen should be marked down 50 percent for this reason alone.

Does the story attack a generic enemy? Vague denunciations of “Washington” or “the media” or “Trump supporters” or “the left” should be marked down 99 percent. Good reporting doesn’t make these kinds of generalizations and is specific about whom is making a claim about what.

Are you asked to rely on one killer factoid? Not a good idea. If a hacked document “proves” an implausible conspiracy, look for the context that shows what the document really means. As for photos and video, use Ronald Reagan’s old slogan: trust but verify. If there’s any doubt about a “stunning” video, see if more traditional sources link to it. They love video clicks as much as anyone. If they refrain, there may be good reason.

Who is the news source, anyway? Traditional news brands may occasionally get it wrong — sometimes hugely wrong — but at least you know where to find them and hold them accountable. Less prominent news sites might carry compelling stories — but expect them to show you who they are and where they gathered information.

Does the news source appear to employ editors? Many news organizations produce stories that are checked before publication. Others don’t. It’s a big deal. Hiring an editorial staff shows the publication’s respect for you, and matters more than “political bias.” The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, for example, have different owners, audiences, stories, perspectives and obsessions. Both have made mistakes and omissions; but both send reporters out into the world and back them up with an editorial process that catches and corrects many errors. This means both can be informative, regardless of your politics or theirs.

Are you told, “Trust me”? Don’t. It’s the post-trust era! Expect everyone to show where their facts come from, link to underlying articles, and demonstrate that they’ve argued honestly. Here’s a way they may bolster their credibility:

Did the writer engage with anyone who disagrees? Did they call a senator whose legislation bugs them? Did they try to grasp what the president-elect was doing, or merely repeat one of his more outrageous statements? If it’s a broadcast interview, was the guest presented with genuine opposing views and challenged to answer? Those who wrestle with opposing arguments do you a service and often improve their own arguments.

These simple questions should take you a long way toward judging the value of a news story. While applying such questions to any given story, you can also take a few more general steps:

  • Broaden your palate. Make a point to check sites that do not agree with your politics. You may discover stories that are wrong — but you’ll know what other people are consuming, which will sharpen your own thinking.
  • Be open to the idea that some falsehoods are sincerely held. In spite of all the warnings here, some inaccurate news stories grow out of haste or misinformation rather than pure cynicism. (But they’re still false.)

  • If a news source consistently passes the tests in this guide, support it.Gathering reliable information isn’t free. Helping to pay for it aligns the news source’s interests with yours.

If this guide helps you to find some reliable information, that’s great — but remember one more thing: Never stop looking. 

Learning the truth is not a goal, but a process.

(by Steve Inskeep)

anonymous asked:

hi!! i just wanted to ask .. if someone would start a studyblr that's not focused on making things pretty, how would they attract people to their blog? i'm poor and have very limited access to any of those fancy aesthetic stuff that most studyblrs have. i really want to make a blog that encourages people like me that they can study raw, messy, and ugly. 🎃

Hi! I don’t think you should stop that from uploading your own photos! Many studyblrs don’t use the popular stationery items and I think that resonates with a lot of them! I’d upload your own images, perhaps watermark them, add in you as the content source or click-through link so traffic is driven back to your blog. You should also use hashtags to help promote your pictures! You can also create your own advice posts or answer ask messages. I think people will appreciate your sense of realness and approach to studying so hopefully that will bring people in anyway! Feel free to send me the name of your blog and I’ll reblog some things x

anonymous asked:

Hey! As an artist /and/ a writer, I'd like to please, please, /please/ ask you to source the images you use for your "writers block: a picture is worth a thousand words" series! Because art theft happens when the source of an image is taken away and the image circulated without proper credit to the artist, the same way some people try to repost writing on another site as their own! please save people trouble and heartbreak and source! Thank you!

Also, please don’t make me be the one to report you for not correctly sourcing images. It takes about five minutes to source an image but it’ll take me a lot longer to trawl through your blog and contact each of the artists whose work you have used without permission.

Hello there, concerned citizen! 

From our FAQ:

For Image Blocks, we cite our sources two ways on the dashboard and two ways on WriteWorld itself. On your dashboard, you can click the image to jump to the source, or you can click the link in the top right-hand corner of the post labeled “Source”. On WriteWorld, you can also click the image to jump to the source, but the clickable link labeled “Source” is located in the lower left-hand corner of the post.

Our sourcing is in accordance with Tumblr’s guidelines and tools regarding sourcing. From Tumblr’s Community Guidelines page: “Make sure you always give proper attribution and include full links back to original sources.” We use Tumblr’s “content source” and “click-through link” input fields to source our Image Blocks.

Posts related to this question:

It might be that you are viewing our posts from a phone. Sometimes Tumblr’s app doesn’t display sourcing correctly on the app. I’m sure Tumblr is working hard to solve this functionality issue to prevent exactly this sort of confusion in the future. 

I hope this helps!

-C

anonymous asked:

hey emma , i know u have probably been asked this before but how do you get followers when you make a studyblr and likes on ur posts???

Hi! Try to remember followers and likes aren’t instantaneous! It does take a while to build a following and get a consistent amount of notes on each post your make. Like I’ve mentioned before, it is difficult not to judge things by followers and likes when everything we see is monitored by numbers! 

Anyway, I’ll divide this into two sections, one about followers and other about posts! For followers:

  • have a user-friendly theme - my pet peeve is themes! I always like mine to look pretty, be functional and free from glitches. Make sure your followers can see everything clearly, navigate through your posts quickly and there was clear links to all your pages. My favourite theme makers include @modernisethemes​, @neonbikethemes, @acuite​, @pohroro, @magnusthemes, and @bychloethemes
  • make an introductory post - these are super cute in the studyblr community and people love to find new blogs and read a little about someone. Tag your favourite blogs or your most inspirational blogs and hope they’ll see it and reblog it too!
  • upload your own tips/advice posts - people (me included) looooove reading how people stay motivated, their study advice or organisation tips so share those!
  • use popular tags - this includes #studyblr, #studyspo, #student, #studying, etc. This can help give your post a little bit of extra exposure. Tag some of the urls of your favourite blogs. For instance if you tag a post with #emmastudies I’ll see it and reblog it!
  • join studyblr networks - I’ve seen a few of these pop up around and about so if you see one, join in! It is also a great way to make friends and get some mutual followers!
  • use a queue - if you use the queue option you don’t need to be on Tumblr 24/7 and that means you can still have an active blog when you’re not around. If you’re having an off-Tumblr day or week, it doesn’t matter because you’ll still be seemingly online!

For likes on your posts:

  • assess your photos - check out the posts that have worked well for you in the past! See if you can improve the quality or editing (e.g. brightness) of your photos before you post them. If you can, try make them unique to you!
  • (try) post at a busy time - this can be tricky to assess but try figure out when you get most engagement. Schedule your posts to publish at a certain time when you think you have the most followers active. It doesn’t matter really what time your post, but it could help with getting the first few notes!
  • use tags - I said this above but tag things with appropriate things. For example, a post about organisation you could tag with “study”, “study method”, “organising”, “organisation”, etc.
  • have a ‘mine’ or ‘original content’ tag on your blog - this might encourage people to click and therefore reblog your own posts.
  • remember to source and click-through your posts - this gives yourself credit as the owner and shows a link to your blog whenever the photo appears on a blog or the dashboard!
  • watermark them - if you can, add a little watermark (like your url) to the photos. That way if they get reblogged or anyone reposts them without you knowing, they’ll still be credit to you which might drive traffic back to your blog.

Hope this helps! xx