source of zinc

Purina Pro Plan Sport

I fed the Salmon variety of this and liked it a lot, so I bought some of the regular Sport to try. Flint did not do well on the EVO I am currently feeding Conker, so I switched him to this. He immediately did much better, and it’s a good thing too, I have 250lbs of this stuff to go through (thanks to a black friday sale)

Ingredients:
Chicken, corn gluten meal, brewers rice, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), poultry by-product meal (source of glucosamine), whole grain corn, corn germ meal, fish meal (source of glucosamine), animal digest, fish oil, dried egg product, salt, calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, calcium phosphate, Vitamin E supplement, choline chloride, L-Lysine monohydrochloride, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, garlic oil, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), and sodium selenite

Guaranteed Analysis:
Crude Protein (Min): 30%
Crude Fat (Min): 20%
Crude Fiber (Max): 3%
Moisture (Max): 12%
Kcals/cup: 475

anonymous asked:

I just became vegan (2 days ago) and was wondering if you had any advice or anything??

Yes! I have loads of advice actually, since it’s not really as simple as just cutting out meat and dairy from your diet and then BOOM, you’re vegan. (There’s a summarisation at the bottom for those of you who don’t want to read a whole essay.)
🌱 B12. A vegan diet does not provide any vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 does a lot of things for your body. It helps make your DNA and your red blood cells, for examples. Deficiency of vitamin B12 can lead to anemia. Therefore your diet must include vitamin B12-fortified grains, a supplement or B12 injections. Preferably one of the two latter to make sure you get enough.

🌱 Calcium. It’s good for your bones. The daily recommended intake for people between the ages of 9-18 is about 1300mg. Sources of well-absorbed calcium for vegans include calcium-fortified “milk” substitutes and juice, calcium-set tofu, soybeans and soynuts, bok choy, broccoli, collards, Chinese cabbage, kale, mustard greens, and okra.

🌱 Omega3. There is evidence that omega-3 fatty acids are useful in the prevention and treatment of heart disease. There is also some evidence that they might be important for cognitive function or useful as a treatment for depression. Good vegan sources are walnuts, flaxseed, canola oil, and chia seeds.

🌱 Vitamin D. If your body doesn’t get enough vitamin D, you’re at risk of developing bone abnormalities such as osteomalacia (soft bones) or osteoporosis (fragile bones). Most Americans get vitamin D through sunshine, fortified milk, and fortified margarine. The only significant, natural sources of vitamin D in foods are fatty fish (e.g. cod liver oil, mackerel, salmon, sardines), eggs (if chickens have been fed vitamin D), and mushrooms (if treated with UV rays). The vegan diet contains little, if any, vitamin D without fortified foods or supplements.

🌱 Vitamin A. Vitamin A deficiency symptoms begin with night blindness and if it progresses can lead to the more severe eye problems of corneal ulcers, scarring, and blindness. Pre-formed vitamin A exists only in animal products. However, there are about 50 carotenoids that the body can convert into vitamin A; the most common is beta-carotene. Carrots, butternut squash, sweet potato, pumpkin, spinach, cantaloupe, kale, broccoli, mango, and apricot are good foods to include in your vegan diet to provide enough vitamin A.

🌱 Iron. The majority of iron in the body is involved in energy production. The largest fraction is found in the hemoglobin of red blood cells and is necessary for oxygen transport throughout the body. Broccoli, spinach, kale, collard greens, sweet potato, tempeh, tofu, soymilk , edamame, kidney beans, pinto beans, peas, lentils, peanut butter, tahini, walnuts, almonds, pistachios, sunflower seeds, dried figs, and raisins are plant foods that contain iron.

🌱 Selenium. Selenium is great for the thyroid. It supports the immune system and it’s a powerful antioxidant. Brazil nuts, shiitake, lima beans, chia seeds, flaxseed, all contain high amounts of selenium.

🌱 Zinc. It stabilises cellular components and membranes and it is involved in wound healing and tissue repair among other things. The best, common plant sources of zinc are legumes, nuts, seeds, and oatmeal.

🌱 Protein. Protein is important for maintaining muscle and bone mass, for keeping the immune system strong, and to prevent fatigue. Make sure to eat lots of legumes such as kidney beans, lentils, pinto beans etc, and you will probably not have to worry about protein deficiency.

To summarise:
🌱 Take B12 supplements!
🌱 Drink calcium fortified non-dairy milk, eat green leafy vegetables!
🌱 Make sure your diet consists mainly of LEGUMES and plant foods!
🌱 Eat nuts and seeds such as brazil nuts, walnuts, flaxseed and chia seeds!
🌱 BEANS BEANS BEANS! EAT THEM EVERYDAY! BEANS!!! BEAAAAANSSSSS!!!!!!

Keep in mind that I’m not a nutritionist nor a doctor.

For more information I recommend the website

http://veganhealth.org

and the youtuber unnaturalvegan

Good luck! 🌱❤️🌻 (just ask if you want me to make a post about activism/anti-fur stuff etc, or want me to explain anything I’ve said in this post.)

ravenbara  asked:

Do you have a list of best to worst pellet brands? My girls are currently on fruit zupreem which I learned is not the best. I have the option of switching them to natural zupreem, lafebar pellets or pretty bird. Do you know which is best?

I don’t have a list of all of them but I get asked this a lot so hold on tight we’re going for a ride! Quick note that I am not a vet or nutritionalist, I’m just collecting information from various sources, if anything is wrong, missed, or misinterpreted please let me know so I can correct it. Ordered from best to worst, I would personally only feed the top 4.

Harrisons (adult lifetime)

Ingredients: *Ground Yellow Corn, *Ground Hull-less Barley, *Hulled Grey Millet, *Ground Soybeans, *Ground Shelled Peanuts, *Ground Shelled Sunflower Seeds, *Ground Lentils, *Ground Green Peas, *Ground Toasted Oat Groats, *Ground Alfalfa, *Ground Rice, *Chia Seed, Calcium Carbonate, Montmorillonite Clay, Vitamin E Supplement, Ground Dried Sea Kelp, Sea Salt, *Sunflower Oil, Natural Mixed Tocopherols, Lecithin, Rosemary Extract, *Algae Meal, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Dl-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Niacin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, D-Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Folic Acid, Zinc Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Carbonate, *Vegetable Oil.*CERTIFIED ORGANIC INGREDIENT

  • Natural soybeans contain toxins (harrisons does state that they roast them to remove toxins, this also removes a lot of nutritional value)
  • Added salt, 19th on the list (lowest of the bunch)
  • Organic ingredients, spoils quickly

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude protein (min.) 14%

Crude fat (min.) 6%

Crude fiber (max.) 4.5%

Moisture (max.) 10%.


Totally Organics

Ingredients: Rice, barley, corn, sunflower seed hulled, alfalfa leaf, sesame seeds unhulled, amaranth whole, quinoa whole, buckwheat hulled, millet hulled, dandelion leaf powder, carrot powder, spinach leaf powder, purple dulse, rose hips powder, rose hips crushed, orange peel powder, lemon peel powder, rosemary whole leaf, cayenne ground, crushed red chili peppers, wheat grass powder, barley grass powder.

  • a lot of powdered ingredients, generally dehydrated or lacking more nutrients than their raw counterparts
  • no added sweeteners or fillers

Guaranteed Analysis:

Protein 15% Max.

Fat 6% Min.

Crude Fiber 6% Max.


Roudybush (maintainence)

Ingredients: Ground Corn, Ground Wheat, Peanut Meal, Soy Oil, Soy Meal, Hydrated Sodium Calcium Aluminosilicate, Yucca schidigen Extract,Salt, Calcium Carbonate, L-Lysine, DL-Methionine, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid, Lecithin, Silicon Dioxide (carrier for liquid antioxidants), Sodium Selenite (on Calcium Carbonate), Niacin, Alpha-Tocopherol Acetate (Source of Vitamin E), Biotin, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Zinc Oxide, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vit. A Acetate, Thiamine, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (Vit K), Cyanocobalamin (VitB12), Vit D3 Sup. Folic Acid, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Propionic Acid, Ammonium Hydroxide, Acetic Acid, Sorbic Acid, Tartaric Acid, and natural apple flavoring.

  • Added salt, 9th on the list
  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • Natural flavouring - These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood.
  • Chemical compounds of nutrients, guaranteed nutrient value, covers it’s nutritional bases, lasts a long time

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein Minimum 11.0%
Crude Fat Minimum 7.0%
Crude Fiber Maximum 3.5%
Moisture Maximum 12.0%


Lafeber (parakeet diet)

Ingredients: Ground corn, soybean meal, wheat flour, oat groats, cane molasses, dried whole egg, canola oil, dicalcium phosphate, ground limestone, iodized salt, citric acid, dl-methionine (an essential amino acid), l-lysine (an essential amino acid), vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, ascorbic acid, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of vitamin K activity), niacin supplement, calcium pantothenate, riboflavin supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin B12 supplement, folic acid, copper lysine, choline chloride, zinc oxide, manganese oxide, mixed tocopherols (a preservative), biotin, sodium selenite.

  • Added salt, 11th on the list
  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • Ground limestone - a common soluble grit, while good for nutrients it may cause issues in the crop
  • Cane molasses - some health benefits but very high in sugar, 5th on the ingredient list,

Guaranteed Analysis: 

Crude protein not less than 15.5%

Crude fat not less than 5%

Crude fibre not more than 3%

Moisture not more than 10.5%


Zupreem (Naturals)

Ingredients: Ground corn, Soybean meal, Ground millet, Ground oat groats, Ground barley, Ground wheat, Wheat germ meal, Sugar, Vegetable oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Ground flaxseed, Calcium carbonate, Dicalcium phosphate, Iodized salt, DL-Methionine, Dried carrots, Dried celery, Dried beets, Dried parsley, Dried cranberries, Dried blueberries, Choline chloride, L-Lysine, Vitamins (Vitamin E supplement, Niacin, Calcium pantothenate, Vitamin A supplement, Biotin, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine hydrochloride, Thiamine mononitrate, Menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), Vitamin B12 supplement, Vitamin D3 supplement, Folic acid), preserved with Mixed tocopherols and Citric acid, Hydrolyzed yeast, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (a source of Vitamin C), Minerals (Manganous oxide, Zinc oxide, Copper sulfate, Sodium selenite, Calcium iodate), Rosemary extract

  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • Added Sugar, 8th on the list
  • Added salt, 13th on the list
  • dried/dehydrated foods
  • most nutritional value is obtained from supplements

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein (min.)14.0%
Crude Fat (min.)4.0%
Crude Fiber (max.)5.0%
Moisture (max.)10.0%

Higgins (InTune Natural)

Ingredients: Ground Yellow Corn, Brown Rice, Soybean Meal, Ground Wheat, Oatmeal, Cane Sugar, Canola Oil (preserved with mixed Tocopherols, a source of Vitamin E), Dicalcium Phosphate, Dried Egg Product, Flaxseed, Calcium Carbonate, Alfalfa Nutrient Concentrate, Sea Salt, Cranberries, Apples, Blueberries, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Spinach, Watercress, Brewer’s Dried Yeast, DL-Methionine, L-Lysine, Choline Chloride, Algae Meal, Mixed Tocopherols (a natural preservative), Rosemary Extract, Potassium Chloride, Yeast Extract, Iron Oxide, L-Carnitine, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C), Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Niacin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Zinc Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (Source of Vitamin K), Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite, Cobalt Carbonate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Turmeric, Natural Annatto Coloring, Beet Juice, Natural Citrus Flavor, Natural Banana Flavor, Natural Pineapple Flavor, Dried Enterococcus Faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Casei Fermentation Product.

  • Added Sugar
  • Cane Sugar - pure sugar, birds may become addicted, may refuse fresh fruits and vegetables, may lead to obesity, heart conditions, high doses of sugar can be toxic
  • Added salt, 15th on the list
  • “natural” flavourings - These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood.
  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude protein (min.) 15%

Crude fat (min.) 5%

Crude fiber (max.) 5%

Moisture (max.) 11%,


Zupreem (veggie blend)

Ingredients: Ground corn, Soybean meal, Ground wheat, Wheat germ meal, Sugar, Vegetable oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Celery, Green beans, Carrots, Parsley, Beets, Peas, Calcium carbonate, Dicalcium phosphate, Iodized salt, Natural carrot flavor, DL-Methionine, Choline chloride, Vitamins (Vitamin E supplement, Niacin, Calcium pantothenate, Vitamin A supplement, Biotin, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine hydrochloride, Thiamine mononitrate, Menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), Vitamin B12 supplement, Vitamin D3 supplement, Folic acid), L-Lysine monohydrochloride, preserved with Citric acid and Mixed tocopherols, Yellow 5, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (a source of Vitamin C), Yellow 6, Minerals (Manganous oxide, Zinc oxide, Copper sulfate, Sodium selenite, Calcium iodate), Blue 1, Color added, Rosemary extract.

  • Dyes are high in sugar
  • Sugar - birds may become addicted, may refuse fresh fruits and vegetables, may lead to obesity, heart conditions, high doses of sugar can be toxic
  • Coloured pellets can cause birds to pick favourites and not eat the other colours, wasting the bag
  • Added salt, 15th on the list
  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • Natural flavours - These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood.


Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein (min.)14%
Crude Fat (min.)4.0%
Crude Fiber (max.)3.5%
Moisture (max.)10%


Pretty Bird (daily select)

Ingredients: Corn, Wheat, Oat Groats, Corn Gluten Meal, Potato Protein, Soya Oil, Coconut Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Dicalcium Phosphate, L-Lysine, Choline Chloride, Natural and Artificial Flavors, DL Methionine, Isoleucine, L-Threonine, L-Tryptophan, Vitamin E Supplement, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Ferrous Sulfate, D-Biotin, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Niacinamide, Magnesium Oxide,Vitamin B12 Supplement,BHT (as a preservative), Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Natural and Artificial Colors, Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol Bisulfite (source of Vitamin K3), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Sulfate.

  • Sugary artificial colours
  • Corn Gluten Meal - little nutritional value, not toxic but just a pointless filler
  • Coloured pellets can cause birds to choose favourites and refuse other colours, wasting the bag
  • Birds have been known to develop sensitivities to food colourings
  • Menadione dimethylpyrimidinol (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • BHT (as a preservative), banned in Japan, Australia, Romania, and Sweden. America has banned it in infant food. Debated in the veterinary field, may cause cancer
  • artificial flavours
  • Natural flavours - These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood.

Guaranteed Analysis:
Crude Protein (min) 14%

Crude Fat/Oil (min) 5 %

Crude Fiber (max) 4%

Moisture (max) 10 %


Nutribird (P15 tropical)

Ingredients: Grains, seeds (at least 10% peanut kernels), fruit (at least 5% fresh fruit), vegetable protein extracts, vegetable by-products, sugar, minerals, L-lysine, methionine, extr. Yucca schidigera, fructo-oligosaccharides, vitamins, trace elements.

  • Sugary artificial colours
  • Sugar -  birds may become addicted, may refuse fresh fruits and vegetables,
  • fructo-oligosaccharides - another sweetener, vegetable-based, used in medicines, high doses may cause digestive upsets, may lead to obesity, heart conditions, high doses of sugar can be toxic
  • Coloured pellets can cause birds to choose favourites and refuse other colours, wasting the bag
  • Birds have been known to develop sensitivities to food colourings
  • Limited real ingredients
  • Very high in fats
  • very limited nutritional value

Guaranteed Analysis

Protein 15%
Fat 16%
Fibre 3.5%

Kaytee (exact rainbow)

Ingredients: Ground Corn, Ground Wheat, Ground Oat Groats, Corn Gluten Meal, Wheat Middlings, Ground Flax Seed, Soybean Meal, Dried Whole Egg, Dried Beet Pulp, Soy Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Wheat Germ Meal, Dicalcium Phosphate, L-Lysine, Salt, Algae Meal (source of DHA), Fructooligosaccharide, Corn Sugar, Brewers Dried Yeast, Vitamin A Supplement, Choline Chloride, Titanium Dioxide, Mixed Tocopherols (a preservative), Yeast Extract, DL-Methionine, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Propionic Acid (a preservative), Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (source of vitamin K activity), Niacin, Rosemary Extract, Citric Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Cholecalciferol (source of vitamin D3), Beta-Carotene, Canthaxanthin, Folic Acid, Calcium Iodate, Biotin, Cobalt Carbonate, Sodium Selenite, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Artificial Colors, Natural and Artificial Flavors. Allergen information: Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts and other tree nuts.

  • Dehydrated fruits and vegetables
  • Sugary artificial colours
  • Coloured pellets can cause birds to choose favourites and refuse other colours, wasting the bag
  • Fructooligosaccharide - another sweetener, vegetable-based, used in medicines, high doses may cause digestive upsets
  • Birds have been known to develop sensitivities to food colourings causing illness, behavioural changes, or neurological health conditions
  • Corn Gluten Meal - little nutritional value, not toxic but just a pointless filler
  • Added salt, 16th on the list
  • Menadione sodium bisulfite (source of vitamin K), a man-made synthetic vitamin K3 which has caused Liver problems, allergic reactions, and anemia in mammals
  • Corn Sugar - pure sugar, birds may become addicted, may refuse fresh fruits and vegetables, may lead to obesity, heart conditions, high doses of sugar can be toxic
  • artificial flavours
  • Natural flavours - These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein (min.) 14.0% 

Crude Fat (min.)5.0% 

Crude Fiber (max.) 5.0% 

Moisture (max.) 12.0%


Menadione - banned in human foods

BHT

Fructo-oligosaccharides

Corn Gluten Meal

“Natural” flavourings

Soybeans

politico.com
The Environmental Scandal in Scott Pruitt’s Backyard
It’s one of the dirtiest places in America. Former residents of Tar Creek, Oklahoma, want to know why Trump’s EPA chief didn’t prosecute allegations of wrongdoing during a federal buyout program.

This is disturbing. I would assume, in a normal set of circumstances, that federal law enforcement officers and the Department of Justice, would be investigating. But in this era of trump and republicans, we don’t live under a normal set of circumstances.

It’s not a pretty story, but the article seems thorough and tells us about corruption, toxic substances, a Superfund site and politicians.

Excerpt:

Tar Creek, Oklahoma, is breathtaking in a terrible way: At one time the world’s deepest source of lead and zinc, the three-town region is now a cratered landscape so poisonous that no one, aside from 10 holdouts, can live there. Mountains of ashlike “chat,” a toxic residue from lead-zinc milling, rise majestically among the remains of homes torn from their foundations. Abandoned pets forage around the ruins. A child’s teddy bear lies sprawled in a ghostly living room. A gorilla statue fronts an empty high school, atop a sign proclaiming “1A Football State Champs, 1984.”

Tar Creek is also part of the environmental legacy of one of the state’s—and nation’s—leading politicians, Senator Jim Inhofe, and his longtime ally, Scott Pruitt, the former Oklahoma attorney general who is now head of President Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency. After the EPA struggled to clean up the area, in 2006, Inhofe endorsed a plan in which a trust overseen by local citizens would use federal dollars to purchase homes and businesses in the toxic region so residents could move elsewhere. Then, when the plan proved so problematic that it spawned more than a half-dozen civil lawsuits and an audit into possible criminal wrongdoing, Pruitt, as the state’s attorney general, invoked an exception to state freedom-of-information laws to keep the audit from being an open public record.

Now, that decision is coming into new light as many Oklahomans clamor for the audit to be released, suggesting that its revelations will prove embarrassing to Inhofe, who played a key role in designing the buyout plan, and cast doubt on Pruitt’s decision not to move forward with charges. Last week, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit called the Campaign for Accountability raised the stakes even further, filing suit in Oklahoma courts to force the release of the audit.“If you take a look at Scott Pruitt’s record, you see a general disregard for transparency,” said Daniel Stevens, the group’s executive director. “I don’t think it’s outside our bounds to say that Pruitt is trying to hide evidence of criminal wrongdoing.”

anonymous asked:

I'm wanting to cut meat out of my diet and eventually all animal products as a whole, but I don't want to not be getting essential vitamins and minerals that are found in meat.. I don't even know the nutrients that's found in meat can you help me out? :)

Hi there! :) Every single nutrient found in meat is in plant based foods, this are the ones that you need to pay special attention:

  • Calcium helps build and maintain strong teeth and bones. Dark green vegetables, such as turnip and collard greens, kale and broccoli, are good plant sources when eaten in sufficient quantities. Calcium-enriched and fortified products, including juices, cereals, soy milk, soy yogurt and tofu, are other options.
  • Iodine is a component in thyroid hormones, which help regulate metabolism, growth and function of key organs. Vegans may not get enough iodine and be at risk of deficiency and possibly even a goiter. In addition, foods such as soybeans, cruciferous vegetables and sweet potatoes may promote a goiter. However, just ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt provides a significant amount of iodine.
  • Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. Dried beans and peas, lentils, enriched cereals, whole-grain products, dark leafy green vegetables and dried fruit are good sources of iron. Because iron isn’t as easily absorbed from plant sources, the recommended intake of iron for vegans is almost double that recommended for non vegans. To help your body absorb iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C, such as strawberries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli, at the same time as you’re eating iron-containing foods.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids areimportant for heart health. Diets that do not include fish and eggs are generally low in active forms of omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil, soy oil, walnuts, ground flaxseed and soybeans are good sources of essential fatty acids. When it comes to the amount of omega-3 oil in various seed oils, the chia seed has the highest content, just above kiwi seeds, perilla and flax.
  • Protein helps maintain healthy skin, bones, muscles and organs. Eggs and dairy products are good sources, You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Plant sources include soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Vitamin B-12 is necessary to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may go undetected in people who eat a vegan diet. This is because the vegan diet is rich in a vitamin called folate, which may mask deficiency in vitamin B-12 until severe problems occur. For this reason, it’s important for vegans to consider vitamin supplements, vitamin-enriched cereals and fortified soy products. Also if you own a garden eat unwashed veggies or fruits once in a while, B-12 comes from the earth, but only if it’s a reliable source!
  • Vitamin D plays an important role in bone health.Vitamin D is added to some brands of soy and rice milk, and some cereals and margarines. Be sure to check food labels. If you don’t eat enough fortified foods and have limited sun exposure, you may need a vitamin D supplement (one derived from plants).
  • Zinc is an essential component of many enzymes and plays a role in cell division and in formation of proteins. Plant sources of zinc include whole grains, soy products, legumes, nuts and wheat germ.

Also you can check out Vegan Health, their nutrition guides are the best I found so far!

politico.com
The Environmental Scandal in Scott Pruitt’s Backyard

Tar Creek, Oklahoma, is breathtaking in a terrible way: At one time the world’s deepest source of lead and zinc, the three-town region is now a cratered landscape so poisonous that no one, aside from 10 holdouts, can live there. Mountains of ashlike “chat,” a toxic residue from lead-zinc milling, rise majestically among the remains of homes torn from their foundations. Abandoned pets forage around the ruins. A child’s teddy bear lies sprawled in a ghostly living room. A gorilla statue fronts an empty high school, atop a sign proclaiming “1A Football State Champs, 1984.”

Tar Creek is also part of the environmental legacy of one of the state’s—and nation’s—leading politicians, Senator Jim Inhofe, and his longtime ally, Scott Pruitt, the former Oklahoma attorney general who is now head of President Donald Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency. After the EPA struggled to clean up the area, in 2006, Inhofe endorsed a plan in which a trust overseen by local citizens would use federal dollars to purchase homes and businesses in the toxic region so residents could move elsewhere. Then, when the plan proved so problematic that it spawned more than a half-dozen civil lawsuits and an audit into possible criminal wrongdoing, Pruitt, as the state’s attorney general, invoked an exception to state freedom-of-information laws to keep the audit from being an open public record.

Now, that decision is coming into new light as many Oklahomans clamor for the audit to be released, suggesting that its revelations will prove embarrassing to Inhofe, who played a key role in designing the buyout plan, and cast doubt on Pruitt’s decision not to move forward with charges. Last week, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit called the Campaign for Accountability raised the stakes even further, filing suit in Oklahoma courts to force the release of the audit.

“If you take a look at Scott Pruitt’s record, you see a general disregard for transparency,” said Daniel Stevens, the group’s executive director. “I don’t think it’s outside our bounds to say that Pruitt is trying to hide evidence of criminal wrongdoing.”

anonymous asked:

I say this because I don't want bad advice out in the world, but being strictly vegan while pregnant is a bad idea, especially for your baby. You need to take supplements for vitamin B12, calcium, iron, folic acid, and protein. You can get calcium from kale and protein from nuts and/or soy, but it's likely to not be enough. Also, you just shouldn't consume soy while pregnant. It messes with hormones, especially for males.

When embarking on such a journey as parenthood, mothers and fathers need to ensure they are informed and aware of both baby and mother’s nutritional needs. Research must be done, books read and eating plans formulated. 

A most recommended vegan pregnancy book, written by mothers with successful pregnancies, births and healthy children is ‘Pregnancy, Children, and the Vegan Diet’ by Dr. Klaper. Another recommended by the Vegan Society is ‘Raising Your Vegan Infant - With Confidence’ by dietician Sandra Hood.

Dr. McDougall also published an informative newsletter about vegan pregnancy, including a part on morning sickness. What I found most fascinating in the newsletter was the research on how most morning sickness is related to meat, fish, poultry, and eggs and that morning sickness is effectively the body’s tool to remove food that is harmful to the mother and child. Dr. McDougall notes that societies with less of a focus on eating animal products have less instances of morning sickness. He also talks about prenatal vitamins, omega-3s, and more.

In their 5th Edition (2004) of the Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, the American Academy of Pediatrics says:

Children exhibit good growth and thrive on most lacto-ovo vegetarian and vegan diets when they are well planned and supplemented appropriately. (Chapter 12: Nutrition Aspects of Vegetarian Diets, p. 194)

In their 2009 Position Paper, Vegetarian Diets, the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada state:

Well-planned vegan, lacto-vegetarian, and lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy and lactation. Appropriately planned vegan, lacto-vegetarian, and lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets satisfy nutrient needs of infants, children, and adolescents and promote normal growth.

As of 2003 the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada considered well-planned vegan diets “appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood and adolescence.”[133] 

Nutrients

To make certain that you are getting adequate nutrition, pay particular attention to the following nutrients.

Calcium: The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for calcium during pregnancy is the same as before pregnancy, 1000 mg/day for women ages 19-50,2 due in part to increased maternal calcium absorption.

Just as it was before pregnancy, getting enough calcium on a vegetarian diet is easy. In fact, calcium absorption from plant foods is often superior to that of dairy products.3 Good sources of calcium include tofu and soy beans, dark green leafy vegetables, bok choy, broccoli, beans, figs, sunflower seeds, tahini, almond butter, calcium-fortified nondairy milk, and calcium-fortified cereals and juices. If these foods are included in the diet every day, calcium needs are easily met.

Essential fatty acids: Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is an essential fatty acid and an important component of the diet. ALA converts in the body into omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA).

The Institute of Medicine has set the adequate intake (AI) for ALA at 1.1 g/day for women ages 19-50 and 1.4 g/day during pregnancy.1 ALA can be found in a number of vegetarian foods. Flaxseeds and flaxseed oil are the most concentrated sources; however, ALA is also found in canola and walnut oils, walnuts, and soybeans.

An important factor in essential fatty acid status for vegetarians is the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. The World Health Organization recommends a ratio of 5:1 to 10:1 for proper conversion of ALA into DHA and EPA.4 The lower the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, the better the conversion. Omega-6 fatty acids are found in seeds, nuts, grains, legumes, and green leafy vegetables, as well as in high concentrations in certain vegetable oils (corn, soybean, safflower, cottonseed, sesame, and sunflower).

The fatty acid that is often discussed regarding vegetarian pregnancy is DHA. DHA has been shown to be lower in the plasma and umbilical cord of babies born to vegetarian mothers.5 Since vegetarians don’t consume any preformed DHA in the diet, they must convert it from ALA. It certainly is possible to meet omega-3 fatty acid needs on the vegetarian diet by consuming enough sources of ALA, balanced by not having too many omega-6 fatty acids. However, if a vegetarian woman is concerned about DHA, microalgae-based supplements are available, marketed under the name Neuromins.

Folate: Folate, or folic acid, is necessary to help prevent neural tube defects and serves other functions as well. Folate is especially important in the first weeks of pregnancy, and it is therefore important that all women of childbearing age get adequate amounts daily. As its name (derived from the word “foliage”) implies, its natural source is leafy greens. Legumes are also rich in folate. Because diets can be erratic, it is prudent to take a multiple vitamin or other supplement that provides at least 400 μg/day. Many breakfast cereals and other grain products are now fortified with folate. During pregnancy, 600 μg/day of folate is needed.6

Iron: Iron needs increase during pregnancy to aid in the development of the fetus and placenta and to maintain increased maternal blood volume. The DRI for women ages 19-50 is 18 mg/day, increasing to 27 mg/day during pregnancy.7 Iron needs may be greater for those on a vegetarian diet because of less efficient absorption of iron from nonanimal sources.8 Iron supplements (or prenatal vitamins containing iron) are often prescribed for women on any kind of diet, as it is difficult for any woman to meet increased needs through diet alone.

Vegetarian women should include iron-rich plant foods daily, in addition to taking their prescribed vitamins or supplements. Iron supplements should not be taken at the same time as tea, coffee, or calcium supplements. Dairy products decrease iron absorption and should be avoided. Iron sources include whole and enriched grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dark green vegetables, dried fruit, and blackstrap molasses. Including vitamin C-rich foods at meals can increase absorption of iron from these sources.

Protein: The DRI for women ages 19-50 is 46 g/day, increasing to 71 g/day during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy (25 grams more than pre-pregnancy needs).1 This is a greater increase than previously recommended; however, it is still easy to meet these protein needs on a vegetarian diet. DRIs are intended to cover the needs for 97.5 percent of the population, so actual needs for most individuals may be slightly lower than this.

Protein sources on a vegetarian diet include whole grains, beans and legumes, soy products, vegetables, and nuts and seeds. A balanced vegetarian diet, providing adequate calories and including these foods, will likely meet protein needs.9 The meal-planning chart above provides plenty of protein for pregnancy.

Vitamin B12: Vitamin B12 needs increase only slightly during pregnancy, increasing from 2.4 μg/day for women ages 19-50 to 2.6 μg/day during pregnancy.6 Vitamin B12 is found in fortified foods, such as fortified cereals, meat substitutes, nondairy milk, and nutritional yeast. Be certain to check the labels to find out which foods are fortified. Seaweed and foods like tempeh are generally not good sources of vitamin B12. To be sure of getting adequate B12, it is prudent to take a prenatal vitamin containing vitamin B12 or to take a vitamin B12 supplement.

Vitamin D: Although vitamin D needs during pregnancy are the same as before pregnancy (5 μg per day),2 it is important to both mother and baby to ensure adequate intake. Vitamin D is made in the body as the result of exposure to sunlight. For many people, 5 to 15 minutes per day of sun between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on the arms and legs or hands, face, and arms during the spring, the summer, and the fall is sufficient to meet vitamin D needs.10

This nutrient is poorly supplied in all diets unless people use foods that are fortified with it. Many brands of ready-to-eat cereals and nondairy milks are fortified with vitamin D. Pregnant women who don’t regularly spend time in the sun, live in northern latitudes, or have darker skin will want to be sure to include fortified foods in their diet. Many prenatal vitamins contain adequate amounts of vitamin D as well.

Zinc: Zinc needs increase during pregnancy. The DRI for women ages 19-50 is 8 mg/day and increases to 11 mg/day during pregnancy.7 Needs for women following a vegetarian diet may be higher, however, because of lower absorption of zinc on a plant-based diet.8

Zinc is often included in prenatal vitamins. In addition, zinc is found in legumes, nuts, whole grains, and cereals. Zinc absorption from plant-based sources can be increased by including sprouted grains, beans, or seeds and yeast-raised breads in the diet, soaking and cooking legumes, and combining zinc sources with acidic ingredients such as lemon juice or tomato sauce.

A note about dietary supplements: Your doctor may recommend a supplement to ensure you are meeting your vitamin/mineral needs. Most prenatal vitamins will be adequate to cover your needs. If you are interested in taking any additional dietary supplements, including herbal or botanical supplements, talk to your doctor. Many herbal supplements may not be safety for pregnancy.

I understand many women are different and I understand that supplements may be taken as well, but there are enough proof that if you eat right and you know what you’re doing you can have a healthy pregnancy. (Birth Stories).

And everybody knows I’m not a doctor, I provide information and advice and people should look for their current doctors and health professionals to double check always how they’re are and if they’re good to go. 

References:

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

HAVE YOU SEEN COSMOPOLITANS ARTICLE ON VEGETARIANS ON SNAPCHAT??!?? Im so angry 😡😡😡😡😡

Omg ok I couldn’t help myself I had to look at it and now I’m raging

1. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK ABOUT VITAMIN D?? Some absolute nutcase obviously wrote this article because I LOVE how there is absolutely no mention of the fact that our bodies synthesise vitamin D from sunlight?!?!?!?

2. Zinc and iron - OK the author is obviously assuming that when it comes to nutrients, more is better. Animal products are higher in these nutrients so therefore they must be better for us? NOT the case. Iron toxicity is extremely common in meat eaters, in fact Chris my boyfriend used to suffer from it himself before going vegan. It is also common for meat eaters to suffer iron deficiency (it is the most common deficiency world wide), so I don’t know where they get off assuming that only vegetarians and vegans are at risk.
ALSO, the author is not taking into consideration that our bodies absorb different amounts of nutrients depending on the source… The amount of zinc contained in beef and iron might be higher than in plant sources, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t absorb the plant source better??

3. The anxiety and depression thing is absolute bullshit. Hey, I’m not the one eating ACTUAL CORTISOL (the stress hormone) ingrained in the dead flesh of the petrified animal that was just murdered so you can eat it. And they also conveniently failed to mention that B12 is produced by bacteria, AND that farmed animals are often injected with or fed B12 supplements, so it is not a valid argument against vegetarianism and veganism.

4. Eating disorders?? Are you really gonna put that on vegos and vegan’s only? Most of the people I know with eating disorders and food obsessions still eat copious amounts of animal products, thank you very much. This is some Jordan Younger bullshit all over again

60smom  asked:

I wanted to know what kind of vegan foods carry the same nutrients that meat and dairy have. I want to become a vegan but I have no idea what foods to eat. Sorry I sound ignorant.

The nutrients that meat and dairy gives you, you can find them in all the other foods you already eat: nuts, vegetables, seeds and fruits. I can’t make a list for now because it will take me some time, but here are the nutrients you need to pay attention when going vegan:

  • Calcium helps build and maintain strong teeth and bones. Dark green vegetables, such as turnip and collard greens, kale and broccoli, are good plant sources when eaten in sufficient quantities. Calcium-enriched and fortified products, including juices, cereals, soy milk, soy yogurt and tofu, are other options.
  • Iodine is a component in thyroid hormones, which help regulate metabolism, growth and function of key organs. Vegans may not get enough iodine and be at risk of deficiency and possibly even a goiter. In addition, foods such as soybeans, cruciferous vegetables and sweet potatoes may promote a goiter. However, just ¼ teaspoon of iodized salt provides a significant amount of iodine.
  • Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells. Dried beans and peas, lentils, enriched cereals, whole-grain products, dark leafy green vegetables and dried fruit are good sources of iron. Because iron isn’t as easily absorbed from plant sources, the recommended intake of iron for vegans is almost double that recommended for non vegans. To help your body absorb iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C, such as strawberries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli, at the same time as you’re eating iron-containing foods.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids areimportant for heart health. Diets that do not include fish and eggs are generally low in active forms of omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil, soy oil, walnuts, ground flaxseed and soybeans are good sources of essential fatty acids. When it comes to the amount of omega-3 oil in various seed oils, the chia seed has the highest content, just above kiwi seeds, perilla and flax.
  • Protein helps maintain healthy skin, bones, muscles and organs. Eggs and dairy products are good sources, You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Plant sources include soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.
  • Vitamin B-12 is necessary to produce red blood cells and prevent anemia. Vitamin B-12 deficiency may go undetected in people who eat a vegan diet. This is because the vegan diet is rich in a vitamin called folate, which may mask deficiency in vitamin B-12 until severe problems occur. For this reason, it’s important for vegans to consider vitamin supplements, vitamin-enriched cereals and fortified soy products. Also if you own a garden eat unwashed veggies or fruits once in a while, B-12 comes from the earth, but only if it’s a reliable source!
  • Vitamin D plays an important role in bone health.Vitamin D is added to some brands of soy and rice milk, and some cereals and margarines. Be sure to check food labels. If you don’t eat enough fortified foods and have limited sun exposure, you may need a vitamin D supplement (one derived from plants).
  • Zinc is an essential component of many enzymes and plays a role in cell division and in formation of proteins. Plant sources of zinc include whole grains, soy products, legumes, nuts and wheat germ.

Visit the website Vegan Health, I highly recommend it because they offer very good explanations about vegan nutrition. :)