soul saturday

4

On this day music history: February 21, 1981 - Prince makes his first appearance on NBC’s Saturday Night Live performing “Party Up”. Hosted that week by actress Charlene Tilton (“Dallas”), Prince is booked on the show on the recommendation of Eddie Murphy who becomes the breakout star of the show’s new cast. The episode becomes infamous because the expletive “f***” is said twice in the program during the live broadcast. Once by Prince during his performance, and by comedian Charles Rocket in a sketch. Rocket is fired for his infraction, while Prince’s goes largely unnoticed on the original broadcast and subsequent re-broadcasts of the program in syndication.

“Seven Stages of Love” by Ipshita Sengupta

On Sunday, we self-destruct.
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Monday: with a confession on a sleepless night, we plant the seed of an empire of affection. .
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Tuesday: Strategically, we wrap our bodies around each other - building our first tower of passion. .
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Following day: We gather fresh flowers matured with love to store them in the darkest corners of our universe. .
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Thursday: Soundlessly, with half open lips, I revere you by writing stories on your eyelids. .
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Third day from last: You undress my bodily garb and worship me by making love to my soul. .
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And on Saturday: In delirium, we poke holes in the ideas of each other. Twist and turn in our bed, chasing sleep in the small hours between dusk and dawn.
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But on Sunday, we self-destruct.

Closing our eyes on each other’s dreams, we die undiscovered, uncertain; defenseless under the moonlit sky.

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Darling, Do You Remember Me?
Lightnin' Hopkins
Darling, Do You Remember Me?

SATURDAY BLUES REVIEW: Darling, Do You Remember Me by Lightnin’ Hopkins - There were many incredible and influential blues guitarists over the years like Buddy Guy and B.B. King. and Robert Johnson.  But for my money, Lightnin’ Hopkins tops them all.  The Texas country blues legend was in many ways the glue between the old school blues of the early 20th century and the more modern artists in the 60’s with the rise of the electric guitar and bigger bands.

What made Hopkins so unique was that he could be a one-man show with vocals and lead and rhythm all in one.  He often played without the benefit of a band, yet you felt nothing was lost as the sound was so full and complete.  On Darling, Do You Remember Me, a tender ballad from the Soul Blues album, it is just the man and the song just floats above you, yet there is so much happening on the guitar even as subtle as it is.  Enjoy and have an relaxing long weekend.

anonymous asked:

We have a customer that comes in every Saturday roughly 10 minutes before close and stays for 20-30 minutes after. EVERY week. She just walks around slowly reading the labels on everything while we sit and repeatedly make closing announcements and stare at her. I work at a dollar store, nothing here requires that much contemplation, I'm pretty sure she just does it to be an ass.

We had one or two customers that did this once a week in the red pigtails, clown, and craft shop I worked. If they’re older it might be out of loneliness. Some times of the day are worse if they are completely cut off from those that they DO have to talk to. It’s sad. Yeah I always wanted to get home but this shit always made me teary. You can tell the difference. They just make small talk, are friendly, etc. Never entitled, just trying to make friends. They seem so obviously desperate. Thinking of this is making me cry. It’s been years since I worked in my last retail or fast food job, so I’m sure they’re gone by now. I just hope they have the company they were needing so much now(I’m not religious but it’s nice to think of it). If they were regular, most of the time they might of knew it was closing time but they were just too afraid to go home to the loneliness and quiet. This lady sounds like one of these sad lonely souls. Reading labels every Saturday doesn’t sound like the normal activity of a usual customer. Please keep an eye out on them. It may even be more severe than loneliness. -Abby