songs in a minor

2

“… it’s called Vices & Virtues, and in one way or the other, at least one to 10 virtues or vices are represented in every song… [it’s] little minor things I didn’t know were vices or virtues, until we looked them up. I was like, ‘I don’t know what altruism means, so I’ll look that up.’ Things like logic, pride, vanity — it can go either way. So it was kind of interesting to read about that.”

– Brendon Urie 

6

Sweet talk
Everything you say
It sounds like
Sweet talk to my ears
You could yell
“Piss off! Won’t you stay away?”
It’ll still be
Sweet talk to my ears


so i think that’s as much of this as i’ll ever do. the glowy stuff kinda got outta hand but i really love it so

Celebrating Diversity... in the Eurovision Song Contest 2017 Grand Final

Australia is sending an Aboriginie - a minority in their country.

Hungary is also sending an artist with Romani origins; but here this is also the theme of the song including lyrics in Romani and reasons how being from a minority affects one’s role in society.

Bulgaria and Denmark also prove how one can feel a strong connection to their roots - despite being based mainly in another country.

Norway is referring to the struggles of mental illness and how you sometimes have to overcome yourself and take risks in order to get better.

Croatia and Romania show how one type of music is significantly for one country / region because music is an universal language.

Belarus is singing a song in their own language - and even though Belarussian is an official language in Belarus most people there tend to speak Russian.

Portugal is also singing in their native tongue - but it also manages to take the listener on a musical journey.

Italy is pointing out how important it is to appreciate and value other cultures and important traditions of other cultures should not be used as a part of other societies’ pop culture.

The “Folkloric Devil” is a term applied to the figure who appears in folk-tales and legends and who is often called “the devil”, but it’s obvious that he emerges from a different source than the theological background of Christianity.

Old divinities or diminished Gods that maintained a presence in the minds or cultures of European peoples are suggested (often enough, and for good reasons) as a source of this figure; but beyond that, the pre-Christian societies had spiritual forces and persons that they related to in the sense of “outsider” powers that could be shady or tricky or dangerous at times, but who often had kinds of relationships nonetheless with human beings. These are the main source of the “folkloric” Devil/Devils.

The Folkloric devil isn’t concerned with damning souls, primarily, but he always wants to make deals or pacts to help humans who need things, but so that he can gain, too- a sign of his origin in the older world of spirit-relationship and spiritual ecology. In Christian gloss, he begins more and more to want “souls” for his help, but he is always able to be tricked, himself- and this is very important. Human heroes or protagonists can outwit him. This is something that would be impossible to do to the Theological Devil, who is far beyond humans in power, and second only to God himself in power.

Modern Pop Culture produces surprising emergences of the old Folkloric Devil- Charlie Daniel’s song “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” is an appearance of a Folkloric Devil, who can be out-played by the intrepid and arrogant local boy, on the fiddle. There is the Christian conceit of the Devil seeking souls in that song, but that’s just a minor detail, more suited to a Christian audience and born from the imagination of a low Protestant folk singer.

The Folkloric Devil is a being- and a representative of a whole class of beings- who can be engaged with by humans, for gains. They can be harmful, they can be helpful, and they can be outwitted or outdone at times. Sometimes, they become protagonists themselves.

Theological Elites in the Pre-Modern period of Europe saw no distinction between their Theological Devil and the various emergences of the Folkloric Devil. The “Devil” of witch cults and covenants and of individual sorcerers or witches was of the Folkloric variety, though in their own personal understandings, even they may have believed that he was the same as the theological devil, such was the nature of their times. It’s not like there was a neat chart that spelled all this stuff out to earlier people, and folk in Pre-Modern times heard Christian ministers ranting alongside fire-side bards telling folktales, and so the Folkloric Devil/Devils could take on Christian gloss and attributes at times, and the Theological devil could appear in decidedly “folkish” ways.

What’s important to remember is that the Theological Devil doesn’t exist except as the shadow of Christian psychology. He is born from the idealistic Christian imagination, as the necessary counter-ideal or counter-force to their idealistic notion of good, the warped good, the fallen good, born in their continuation of earlier dualistic religious tropes that posited a cosmic war between good and evil cosmological forces.

The Folkloric Devil, on the other hand, very much exists, both in the form of a powerful former divinity worshiped by practically every human culture known previous to Christianity, and as a folk-memory of certain spirit-entities (very much tied to this world) that people have always engaged in relationships with, though they are a group of entities who are, in ways, challenging, dangerous at points, and ambiguous.

The Theological Devil is a remnant of idealism and the diseased imagination of absolutists and idealists. The Folkloric Devil is a remnant of ancient spiritual ecology and human relationships to the wilder, stranger Otherworld.

- Robin Artisson

okay like does anyone else raised Mormon remember that weird ass minor key “Follow the Prophet” song with like eighteen verses we had to sing in Primary, like obviously it seemed normal and fun at the time but in hindsight that absolutely was kinda fucked up