someone stop this human

4

So yeah.. about that whole studying for finals thing… I’ve currently fallen into a bottomless pit and can’t seem to stop drawing things from @doodledrawsthings ‘s lovely human Bill au and @videogamelover99 ‘s amazing fics.

lol okay buddy whatever u say

Sometimes I just have this overwhelming feeling of hatred for the human race. This is how I know it is time to hermit.
—  INTP

I hate the missapropriation of the concept of trolling.

Trolling: An American saying “the Beatles? I don’t know her” then watching as everyone who loves the Beatles gets mad. And its funny because: why are they mad that someone they don’t know doesn’t know the Beatles???And also it’s nearly impossible that you’re an American who has never even tangentially been exposed to them, so it’s easy to see it’s a joke because it’s–culturally–wild hyperbolic.

Not Trolling: “I’m going to directly antagonize a socioeconomically marginalized group! ” for the pure entertainment of seeing someone try to defend their own humanity and beg you to stop turning ‘hurting them’ into entertainment. Because you think other people’s trauma is amusing and you equate personal emotional disconnect directly to intellect/power/prestige as if such a thing is causation rather than correlation. Which ultimately creates a scenario in which the “troll” trolls for the objective purpose of fueling their own personal self worth with the ultimate goal of gaining ideological support from peers. (Aka: look how sad that person is, I am not sad, which makes me smart. If enough people see me being smart, that makes me cool. I like how being cool feels so I don’t care about what I sacrifice to achieve that)

Not the communal appreciation for comedic hyperbole of the Beatles joke.

Like.

One is a fun social joke that requires group participation. In which an aspect of the joke is that it probably takes someone a second look to see that you’re kidding. But even if it takes someone longer and they get really mad, when it’s revealed you knew who the Beatles were all along and you were just pretending to be obtuse in a hyperbolic way, they too can laugh at the joke.

The other is as close as you can get to group sociopathy. And also is less fun in general. And a bit sad for the person who receives their emotional support at the cost of demeaning others. But also it’s incredible damaging, as it normalizes negative sentiment towards whatever group is being attacked/disenfranchised/ belittled/hypersinplified/disregarded. And worse, most of these interactions (that older stronger people can brush off) can often be seen by children who have no defenses against certain concepts which is sad, and incredibly reckless.

6

(I can’t draw anything but humans so here you go BENDYANDTHEINKMACHINEAAAHHHHHH~~~ 🎵🎵🎵) Joey, stop the children

anonymous asked:

*breaks the spell on the portal* quick, friend get out before someone else stops you again. Humanity needs to. BURN. IN. HELL. (or shadows, which ever you perfer)

I was thinking of this curious habit we humans have of demonizing and dehumanizing people we don’t like. It’s kind of a No True Scotsman deal where we just systematically decide this group of people is no longer the same thinking, feeling human being as I am.

It’s not even just with things like racism (although don’t get me wrong, racism is horrible), this is an antifa thing. This is a “Let’s kill all the goat-f*ckers” thing. This is a “What that person did was so bad they can’t possibly be a person” thing. It is, for lack of a better word, illogical.

There’s footage of Adolf Hitler telling jokes and petting kittens and people are genuinely surprised to see and know this, as if he was some kind of alien who orchestrated a genocide. They can’t even seem to process that a real, flesh-and-blood human was behind those horrors and he did normal mundane people things just like you and I. We’d all want to distance ourselves from someone like him, and maybe that’s understandable, but it’s also a bit….self-righteous.

Much as we’d all like to think “real” people would Never Do Really Bad Things, everyone is capable of it to some extent. If you’d been brought up in a different environment, raised by different parents, experienced different things in life, lived in a different time, you would likely be very different from who you are today. You may be better, you may be far worse. You may be so bad that someone out there will decide you’ve stopped being a “real” human and be relegated to this nebulous concept of being a “monster.”

Monsters are people. People can be monsters. I think that is a part of humility - realizing that you are not immune to being cruel to the point of monstrosity and that cruel people are still humans with souls, with thoughts, with feelings, with loved ones, with normal, mundane interests. With the capacity to do vile things.

Interrogation as Torture

Interrogation is probably the scenario that comes to most Western people’s minds when torture is mentioned. The belief that torture can be used during interrogation is heavily ingrained in Western pop culture whether the story believes it ‘works’ or not.

I’m going to go over some of the most common misconceptions about what bringing torture to the interrogation table does and does not do.

Tell the Truth

‘Care must be exercised when making use of rebukes, invectives or torture as it will result in his telling falsehoods and making a fool of you.’ Japanese Kempeitai manual found in Burman 1943

The use of force often has the consequence that the person being interrogated under duress confesses falsely because he is afraid and as a consequence agrees to everything the interrogator wishes.’ Indonesian interrogation manual, East Timor, 1983

Intense pain is quite likely to produce false confessions concocted as a means of escaping from distress.’ CIA Kubark Counterintelligence Manual 1963

I can’t prove conclusively that in the history of the world torture has never ever once produced accurate information. Overwhelmingly often it does not. There are several reasons why.

Torture produces a lot of lies. Both people with information and people without information have a good reason to lie under torture. And they both do. The person with information does not want to give it up. The person without information needs to say something to make the torture stop.

Humans are bad at telling when someone is lying. When tested even people who think they’re good at spotting lies can’t do it consistently. It can be almost impossible to tell who is hiding something and who genuinely doesn’t know what’s going on. A person under torture might have already told the truth and started lying when the interrogator didn’t believe them. Which is exactly what happened to Shelia Cassidy when she was tortured in Chile in the 70s.

Pain and stress destroy the human memory. Experiments with willing volunteers have repeatedly shown that stress, pain and lack of sleep make it difficult for people to remember. A 2004 paper using US military survival school as the ‘high stress situation’ which simulated capture and interment as a POW (C A Morgan et al, International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27, 265-279) found that between 51-68% of soldiers identified the wrong person as their interrogator. Interrogations had lasted four hours with the interrogator shouting at and manhandling the volunteers. The low stress group identified the wrong person 12-38% of the time.


Torture results in loss of public trust. Most police and intelligence investigations live or die on public support. People coming forward voluntarily with accurate information. People reporting on suspects. In the long term torture actively recruits for the opposing ‘side’. According to the IRA this is exactly what happened in Northern Ireland when the British used torture. It also happened in Aden and to a lesser extent Cyprus.

Torture in short produces more lies than truth and in such a mixture that it can be hard to tell which is which. Because of the pain it causes torture can make it impossible for victims who want to tell the truth to actually do so accurately. And because of the effect it has on communities it often makes it harder to gather accurate information through more reliable sources.

Accuracy in torture is so poor it is ‘in some cases less accurate than flipping a coin’. (No that isn’t exaggeration, that’s a quote from D Rejali who literally wrote the book)

The Ticking Bomb

The famous ‘ticking-bomb’ scenario is a fictional situation (it literally came from a novel, written by a suspected torturer) where a disaster (such as a bomb attack) is known to be approaching and in order to save innocent lives the characters need more intel fast.

So they start debating whether to use torture.

Depending on the story and the characters they sometimes do torture. Usually if they do it gives them information they then use to save lives.

There’s another problem, aside from the total lack of accuracy for information that comes from torture. Torture takes as long or longer than other interrogation techniques.

According to the CIA’s own records detainees were put through several days of sleep deprivation before interrogation. The Senate Torture Report (testimony from Ali Soufan) estimated that their torture techniques took 30 days.

According to British records and accounts from the IRA during the Troubles a single torture session by ‘walling’ (sleep deprivation, white noise and stress positions combined) could last between nine and forty three hours.

I’ve selected the following quotes to give an idea of the time frame for short tortures used in interrogation. Both are from Northern Ireland by Irish men detained by the British. Emphasis is mine.

‘One powerfully built RUC detective would keep me pinned in a position while the other one would hold my elbow then press back on my wrist. And that could last for an hour or possibly two hours. And it’s excruciatingly painful, to the extent that I remember after three or four days I would simply go unconscious-’ Tommy McKearney

When I was taken away from Girdwood to be interned, I thought I had been there for about eight days, but it was only three. I later realised I was only being allowed to sleep for ten minutes at a time.’ Joe Docherty

Interrogation always takes time. And that time is measured in days not minutes.

Sanitised Portrayals

‘NO useful information so far….He did vomit a couple of times during the water board with some beans and rice. It’s been 10 hours since he ate so this is surprising and disturbing.’ Senate Torture Report, from quoted emails SSCI 2014, 41-42

For me this is one of the most noticeable differences between torture in pop culture and torture in reality. Torture in films and books is always sanitised.

I don’t mean that it isn’t gory or isn’t gory ‘enough’. Blood seems to be a cinematic staple and seeing the hero beaten and bloodied in a dingy lit room has become standard in a certain sort of action story.

What I’m talking about are the body fluids and products we’re trained to think are less acceptable. Vomit. Urine. Mucus. Faeces.

I can think of several movies where a ‘good-guy’ gets beaten to a bloody pulp on screen. I can’t think of any where they piss themselves. But losing control of bladder and bowel function seem to be pretty common in real life. A lot of the eyewitness accounts I’ve read about systematic torture mention the smell of urine and shit.

Vomiting is something I don’t see mentioned as often in survivor accounts but I think it’s very likely to occur frequently because a lot of common methods of torture produce nausea.


The ‘Tough’ Interrogator

 

It may be only later, outside of that specific environment, that the torturer may question his or her behaviour, and begin to experience psychological damage resulting from involvement in torture and trauma. In these cases, the resulting psychological symptoms are very similar to those of victims, including anxiety, intrusive traumatic memories and impaired cognitive and social functioning.’ Psychologists Mark Costanzo and Ellen Gerrity.

Those techniques [CIA ‘enhanced interrogation’ techniques] are so harsh it’s emotionally distressing to the people who are administering them.’ Dr James Mitchell, psychologist involved in the CIA’s EIT program.

We are where we are- and we’re left popping our Prozac and taking our pills at night.’ Anonymous torturer quoted in Cruel Britannia

There’s a growing body of evidence that torture has a negative psychological effect on the torturer.

The evidence is for the most part anecdotal, based on patterns emerging across interviews. Torturers, funnily enough, don’t show up in droves for psychological studies. But there is a pattern. One of substance abuse, addiction, PTSD and suicide.

The cause of these symptoms in torturers is the same thing that causes trauma in people who witness horrific things. It is well known that seeing violent attacks on others can cause trauma in witnesses.

Humans are empathic creatures.

There is a measurable, automatic response in the brain to seeing others in pain. We can not control it and we can not stop it. Even when we are told that the other person is anaesthetized our brains still respond to their perceived pain.

This, combined with the destruction of normal social interaction and dehumanisation, appears in a very real sense to harm torturers.

If you’re planning to use torture as part of an interrogation scene it’s worth noting that some torturers do believe torture is a useful way to get information, despite the evidence. Some of them cling to the idea that they had to torture, that what they did was useful and saved lives. Some of them seem to overplay the value of torture in order to justify their own actions and jobs.

None of that makes them immune to the effect of torturing another human being.

Disclaimer

[Additional Sources-

‘Torture and Democracy’, Princeton, D Rejali (Only order this if you’ll be at home to pick it up, at over 850 pages it’s a monster)

‘Accuracy of eyewitness memory for person encountered during exposure to highly intense stress’, The International Journal of Law and Psychiatry C A Morgan, G Hazlett, A Doran, S Garrett, G Hoyt, P Thomas, M Baranoksi, S M Southwick, 2004 (This team have actually done a series on high stress situations and the effects on memory. Charles Morgan is the first author on this set of papers.)

‘Audacity to Believe’ Cleveland, S Cassidy

‘Why Torture Doesn’t Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation.’ Harvard University Press, S O’Mara (Highly recommended, reasonably accessible for a layman)

‘Cruel Britannia: A Secret History of Torture.’ Portobello Books, I Cobain (Very good history, although the author doesn’t seem to understand many of the techniques he writes about)

‘What are you feeling? Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Assess the Modulation of Sensory and Affective Responses during Empathy for Pain’, PLoS ONE, C Lamm, H C Nusbaum, A N Meltzoff, J Decety 2007 (The experiments in this paper include brain scans of people seeing photos of a needle and a hand in various different positions, some of which would be painful. There wasn’t much change in brain response if the volunteers were told the hand couldn’t feel pain.)]

New autocorrect meme, write in the tags “Dirk Strider is” and then click the middle predictive text ten times

Idols happy, healthy, having a great time, not being hated on, not being ignored, being loved, being respected and laughing.

- A CONCEPT

Self-help;

. Get out more, if only for an hour than great. That same night when you lie in bed you will feel like you have accomplished something.

. ANSWER loved one’s messages, even when they are such a BORE.

. Stop making excuses when someone asks you to go out, fellow human interaction is good for the soul.

. Limit use of Laptop, Tv and books… yes books! There is a life beyond pages, you just have to go live it.

. Don’t dwell on the past, it’s not going to help you in the future.

. Stick to the Five-Finger rule, if you can’t count all your close friends on one hand it’s time to make some cut backs. No one has the mental capacity to please more than five friends.

. Last but not least, you are only human you have flaws, but those flaws are what make you YOU.


- boundtotheballad

Head canons // Clones x Flirting

Rex:

+Believe it or not, this doofus can be suave when he wants to be. 

+Like you could have been dating for months before hand but he’s still on dial ten when he takes you out.

+it can be subtle things, wrapping an arm around you, rubbing your arms up and down when you’re cold (he’d give you a jacket if he had one), holding doors open, buying you a drink, ordering for you at restaurants, picking you a flower or two / pretty rocks  while y’all are on missions. /the p e r f e c t  gentleman/

+or he can just be sitting across from you at 79′s and say, “You are absolutely, stunningly gorgeous, and somehow that’s the least interesting thing about you.”

+”If I had a star for overtime you made me smile, I’d have the entire galaxy in my hands.”

-let that sink in. woah. 

Fives:

+Fives is cheesy as fuck. 

-”Your eyes are bluer and deeper than the oceans or Naboo, and, baby, I’m lost at sea.” “Fives, my eyes aren’t blue.”

-”If I could rearrange the alphabet, I would put ‘U’ and 'I’ together.”

+It’s worse when he’s drunk

-”I’m not drunk, I’m just intoxicated by YOU.” “No, sweetheart your drunk.”

Echo:

+He’s super awkward (also terrified of being as embarrassing as Fives)

+He mostly ends up saying really beautiful things that he may or may not have seen on the star wars equivalent of Pinterest. 

-”You’re kinda, sorts, basically, always on my mind.”

-”If stars would fall overtime I thought of you, the sky would soon be empty.”

Wolffe:

+Wolffe doesn’t flirt with words.

+He gives you certain /looks/ and uses body langue. Good luck with that. 

+When he’s looking at you like /that/ it’s not hard to believe he thinks you’re beautiful. 

-“You’re the reason men fall in love.” 

Kix: 

+He flirts only in medical jokes. Please someone stop him. 

-The human body is 65% water, and darlin’, you got me thirsty. 

-Smoking is a hazard to your health, and baby you’re killing me.

-Rejection can lead to emotional stress for both parties involved and emotional stress can lead to physical complications such as headaches, ulcers, cancerous tumors, and even death! So for my health and yours, JUST SAY YES!


Requested by @13skullyhorror13  I’m always a slut for cheesy pick up lines.

To Help #2

Zen OPPA to the rescue! Now you know this boy will be coming in to save MC’s butt no matter what she needs. 

There’s a bomb in her house? He’s there. 

Psycho is about to kill her? He’s about to throw down some fists. 

MC is crying because she stubbed her toe on the foot of the couch? He’ll punch the crap out that couch. Not that it would help but it makes MC smile :)

Now this one will have definite mention of sexy time activities in it and expletives so be warned before reading- but if it doesn’t bother you, hopefully you enjoy! … oh and that brevity thing? Yeah I killed it. There is no such thing as brevity. Meet its replacement- big ass chunk of text >_

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