someone find her a great film and a great character for her

lili & cole on betty & jughead

“But what I found when I was really diving in — because once we started putting Jughead and Betty together, I started diving into try and find out if that’s a narrative that even exists in the digests, and it turns out, it is. It’s a narrative that’s existed for a long time. There are a handful of digests in which Jughead would say things like ‘Oh, Betty, if I did like women I guarantee you would be the one I would marry outright. You are the best person around.’ He would say these things that are really romantic and cute with an appreciation for Betty and I think it’s become clear to me now that Roberto has taken off with that.” –cole

“This is a new universe, this is a new take on Jughead, and he is this tortured damaged kid — this Holden Caulfield — who is looking for someone who can relate to him on a personal level and that narrative itself is also beautiful. While I think that [asexual] representation is needed, this Jughead is not that Jughead. This Jughead is not Zdarsky’s Jughead and this Jughead is not the aromantic Jughead. This Jughead is a person who is looking for a kind of deeper companionship with a person like Betty..and Betty ends up being this super nurturing, caring, catering person that with Jughead’s super screwed-up past they end up diving into each other and it ends up being a beautiful thing. How are people going to respond? Truthfully, they’re probably going to be quite incendiary about it at first. Do I think that’s ill-placed? No. Do I think they should give it a shot? Yeah, I do, because I think that after filming thirteen episodes, it makes sense to me and if it makes sense to me as the person who’s dumping so much time and so much argumentation into trying to represent Jughead correctly, it will make sense to other people as well.” –cole

It’s important to remember that — though Betty and Archie when they were younger were this cute couple — Jughead, Betty and Archie were the three childhood friends. So Betty knows Jughead probably just as well as Archie does in certain ways and she is also this sort of nostalgic force of what was once morally just. I do believe Jughead is absolutely obsessed with what was once Riverdale, and Betty still represents this morality and purity that he associates to this more ‘Peter Pan’-like childhood version of Riverdale. He finds great comfort in that and becomes easily accessible and resonates with him.” –cole

So there are a couple episodes — I won’t spoil too much — where you definitely get to see Jughead without a hat on, but we’ve saved it only for real vulnerable and personal moments. Yeah, you only see Jughead without his hat on in super vulnerable moments, because we kind of sold it as like his security blanket of sorts, and so – when he’s willing to take it off – it becomes this kind of special, vulnerable, personal thing. I think the first time he loses his hat is a moment with Betty.” –cole

“I’m really excited for people to see it. I hope their reaction is good. I mean, a lot of people– everyone has their own couple that they want to work on the show, but I think Betty and Jughead’s relationship as it progresses is really quite beautiful and they’re very supportive for one another, so I hope people appreciate that. And I think they will. Kind of all things aside, Jughead and Betty make each other happy.” –lili

Jughead was this character that was very much searching for a comfort and companionship in other people, and he ended up finding that within this super nurturing, care-taking, loving figure that Betty Cooper has become. And I think it makes a lot of sense narratively, the way the show has taken place, that the two of them end up sort of teaming up and becoming this force of investigation and companionship. And, you know, it’s very much a– It’s something deeper and more romantic than what I think people are going to expect, which is nice.” –cole

I think Betty makes Jug happy… Brings out, you know, the happiness in him.” –lili    

“I think, in this show, he’s not a romantic and not asexual. I argued in the beginning, creatively, that he should be both, but in this show, he’s kind of a tortured youth that ends up finding a comfort and a resonance with another person who’s going through a lot of trauma. They end up forming this kind of beautiful, honest union, and I think that, to me, is a narrative that works with this universe of Jughead.” –cole

Betty and Jughead end up being a wonderful match.” –lili

“I think Betty sees someone who genuinely cares for her and that’s not to say that Archie doesn’t, but I think Archie is preoccupied with other things and other women in his life. Jughead on the other hand is just dealing with his own family issues, which he doesn’t share with Betty until later on in the season. But he just really cares about Betty because she’s so lovable and I think he can’t help it. But Betty sees this genuine, outsider in him and she can relate because I think Betty feels like an outsider at times too. I think that is what draws her to him a little bit because they both don’t necessarily fit in.” –lili

“I think they begin to learn a lot more about each other’s family histories and family life, especially when Betty finds out about Jughead’s homelessness and it’s kind of beautiful to see Betty accept Jughead’s past and conquer it with him.” –lili

“Betty is best friends with Archie, which means she grew up with Jughead. They know each other, and they’re friends. Jughead is more outwardly dark and brooding, and Betty wishes she could be more like that. On the outside, they couldn’t be more different, but a lot of what Betty feels on the inside is what Jughead presents to the world — and that’s something that she hasn’t been able to do, out of pressure from her parents. She can’t present weakness to the world, and that’s what attracts her to Jughead. She’s attracted to his darkness because she relates to it. She feels like an outsider at the end of the day, which is why they make such a great pair. They’re both outsiders.” –lili

I think that she can appreciate his moodiness and his darkness because she has that within her self as well and I think that Jughead is a very caring and passionate guy and Betty helps bring out that side of him.” – lili

“They team up in that way — it starts with them working together, then their bond just gets closer. Jug helps Betty search for Polly, and she helps Jughead with [upcoming] family problems. It’s a beautiful friendship and maybe turns into something more.” –lili

Jughead finds a kind of comfort in Betty, and Betty finds a comfort in Jughead that allows them to step outside of the shit in their private lives for a moment. They really end up exploring it across the episode, and well, it works. It does. Jughead really cherishes few people and when he does, he goes full throttle with it, and Betty is the same. They’re both looking for comfort… and they find it.” –cole

“I had sort of read it as, well, if Jughead can be a force of clarity in Betty’s life in that moment where she’s sort of hyperventilating and panicking – if his romance with Betty can be the thing that allows her to see clearly, that’s something I think he [would take] pride in.” –cole

There is more than just a friendship there. It’s more than just platonic. But I think sex and being sexual is the last thing on both of their minds because they both obviously have a lot of family issues they’re dealing with. And even being sexual teenagers—again, they are more mature, while Archie is still stuck in that headspace. It just shows the different levels and the different maturities of the characters. At this point, Betty and Jughead are taking their time. That’s so much more satisfying to me as an audience member because it makes when they kiss so much more special.” –lili

When you put two passionate people together like that—especially when they’re trying to find Polly—a very intimate relationship comes out of it, and that’s what you see happens. In last week’s episode, Jughead was all about helping Betty. In tonight’s episode, Betty is all about helping Jughead. It’s a give and take, not one-sided, which may have happened in a less mature relationship.” –lili

“They are pulled together because Betty keeps her darkness on the inside, and I think Jughead wears it on the outside. They are slowly drifting together because she’s attracted to his darkness and his ability to come to terms and live with his dark side, whereas she pushes it away. He doesn’t necessarily try to push his bright side away; it just doesn’t come out very often. I think Betty brings out that side in him.” –lili

“As a couple they– They’re like the investigative journalistic duo here, working at the Blue and Gold. And I think their relationship started off being the journalists, being the two detectives in the school, and then it kind of branched into something romantic for both of them.” –lili

They compare themselves to Romeo and Juliet a couple times because he’s from the wrong side of the tracks and she’s the perfect girl next door. So I think there’s a star-crossed lover kind of aspect.” –lili

“I think they’re both romantics, and being put in a situation where they’re solving a murder kind of brings you close to someone, and I think they have a deep appreciation for each other. I think it’s really, it’s real and it’s there.” –lili

“I think in the following episodes, specifically episode 10, Bughead stops truly being like some sort of perfect, joyous thing; And the two of them start to investigate: Okay, can these personalities actually be compatible? Jughead is kind of the loner of Riverdale, and is intimidated by intimacy– and that gets explored. Betty’s this kind of person who’s outwardly striving for perfection, or people expect perfection of– and that also gets explored. And, so, it gets complicated, but understandable and real.” –cole

“I think, from our show’s perspective– They’re both so opposite on the outside in their appearances, but they’re very similar on the inside. They’re both kind of these tortured souls in a way, don’t you think? So, I mean, they’re both kind of on the outside in a sense, and that’s what I think kind of brings them together a little bit.” –lili

I think that similar passion was also the sort of thing that brought them close at the end of the day. I think there’s truth in that.” –cole

They balance each other very well. Betty has such a soft exterior, and he has such a harsh one. They’re kind of opposites in that sense. But I think internally, they’re both very emotionally complex characters and they’re both really passionate. Jughead is such a passionate writer and betty is such a passionate journalist, and they’re kind of like this little crime-fighting duo taking on this mystery together and I think that helps bring them closer.” –lili

“I think she’s in love with him. She says, ‘I love jughead,’ not ‘I’m in love with jughead,’ and I think there’s definitely a difference between those two things. But I do think that at that point in time, she’s falling in love. I really love them together, I really do. Some people either love them together or hate them together, but they make each other happy, you can’t deny that.” –lili

“they have a connection, unlike all the other characters, where their darkness kind of intertwines, and that’s beautiful. When they can still love each other through the darkness, that’s amazing. How he kisses her hand was actually my idea. I was like, ‘that just shows the love. When you show someone such a vulnerable side of yourself, when they physically can kiss it to show you they love every part of you, that is love.’” –lili

I think betty is very happy with jughead. I think she loves him. She loves archie as well, but I think it’s a different kind of love at this point. I think betty is smooth sailing with jughead, and isn’t confused about her feelings.” –lili

“Bughead has been through a lot of trauma Season 1 and will experience more in Season 2. It’s not smooth sailing — we get darker and weirder in Season 2.” –cole

“They’re balancing their personalities off each other, which is so apparently contrasting, and I think they’re obviously going to have realistic bumps in the road.” –cole

“With any young relationship, they’re still figuring out who they are. That kind of affects your relationship with other people. Things change. People breakup and get back together. It’s kind of an open-ended situation because anything can happen between two teenagers who are falling in love.” –lili

I want them to have a happily ever after if it’s honest and real. If they can comfort each other in a storm of shit that seems to be hitting them at light-speed, that’s what I want.“ –cole

It makes sense to have these two people who are kind of lonely and on the outside and don’t really fit in to a particular group to be together. I do hope they pull through, as long as they keep making each other happy.“ –lili

“I think the key is that it feels honest and real. Both of those kids are going through an absolute whirlwind in terms of things that they’ve seen and done over the last season, so, i think… I can hope that they just sorta work through whatever is going to be thrown at them in a way that feels genuine and communicative. And give that kind of relationship to kids who are watching would be awesome.” –cole

“I think she’s scared for her boy. I think it makes them even more of a Romeo and Juliet kind of situation because she’s thinking that he’s gonna being joining the southside and she’s on the northside. Season 2 focuses a lot on this civil war between riverdale (the northside and the southside); and she’s not caught in the middle, but the guy that she loves is on the opposite side. So, I think she’s quite terrified for that because she cares about him a lot.” –lili

lili on b*rchie & the love triangle

“It’s more about the relationships between the characters. A lot of people go into this show thinking that this guy has to choose between these two girls, and that’s the plot of the show. But that’s very much not our show. These characters are working through real issues. The main plot point of Season 1 is Jason’s murder. It’s definitely not the love triangle. I don’t think there’s even that much of a love triangle. Betty has already accepted the fact that Archie doesn’t love her that way, and she knows you can’t force someone to think differently about you. She needs to move on.

Archie is such a mess! They’re just two people who are so much better off as friends, but she doesn’t realize it just yet. That’s OK. She’s young. She’ll realize it eventually.

“He’s a confused teenage boy. He doesn’t know what he wants, romantically or for his future. He’s just lost. She has sympathy for him, but she’s trying to protect him. At the end of the day, she doesn’t want him to get hurt or wrapped up in something dangerous. I think her opinion of him, as a person, doesn’t change, but her opinion of him, as a romantic figure in her life, changes. She grew up with him as a best friend, and when you grow up with a guy as a best friend when you’re a girl, it’s hard not to see yourselves becoming romantically involved. You’re like, “We’ve been best friends. Why don’t we just be together?” That’s what she thought. Maybe she wasn’t really in love with him. Maybe she just thought she was because it felt like the right thing to do. It wasn’t easy, but it was easier than you would think for her to get over the fact that they shouldn’t be together, romantically. She just had an idea in her head of the perfect couple that was Betty and Archie, but in reality, it wasn’t there and it wouldn’t have been as good.

“In the comic books, Archie just kind of picks between each girl every other day. No girl wants to watch a girl on television be pulled apart by a guy every which way. You want a girl who doesn’t let someone do that to her.

“No, I wouldn’t say that necessarily. I think there will always be the undertone of that famous love triangle, but for right now at this point in the season, Betty and Archie are kind of going off into their own little romantic endeavors instead of with each other.

It was important to us that Archie did not come between these girls. He does for a second, but the main goal of our show – and Roberto [Aguirre-Sacasa] talked about it beforehand – is that Archie is not going to stand between a friendship between these two girls who are destined to be best friends. They are classic frenemies, but on our show, they’re just friends. They just love and care about each other. Betty has a different love interest in the show. She comes to terms pretty fast with the fact that Archie doesn’t see her in a romantic way. She gets it and can’t be mad at him for not feeling a certain way about her. And she can’t get mad at Veronica for wanting to be with Archie ‘cause she gets how great of a guy he is. Veronica wasn’t intentionally trying to hurt Betty.”

At first I thought, yeah of course they’re gonna end up together; at the end of the day, end of the series, that’s what’s right and what’s meant to happen. Now, I’m not so sure. I think Archie and Betty are so much better off as friends, and it’s kind of like when you’re so close to a person of the opposite sex, if things were to get romantic, it would feel so wrong.

K.J. is such a Betty and Archie [fan]! He wants them together!

“No, I feel like when he was introduced to the Archie story he was told Betty and Archie are endgame, so I think that’s what he sticks to and thinks must be the right thing. But you do see maybe some flares of jealousy; it comes with the territory when your best friend is with someone else. It’s like, “Who is this person?” It’s this territorial thing for your best friend.

“I think betty is very happy with jughead. I think she loves him. She loves archie as well, but I think it’s a different kind of love at this point. I think betty is smooth sailing with jughead, and isn’t confused about her feelings.

"That’s the whole point, our show is not a direct carbon copy of the comics.

I don’t think she feels possessive over archie anymore.

I personally don’t really look back to the comics as much because betty is very very different. She’s kind of like this gullible, naive girl who lets a man walk all over her a little bit; and the fact that our betty is not that way is something I’m proud of.

“I think it’s safe to say that betty is very happy with jughead and there is no bad blood… I think she is happy for her friends, if they are happy.” 

Ouat Con Chicago 2017 - Colin’s Panel
  • The girl who asked the 1st question just started crying because she was so excited & Colin was like “we’re off to a great start!” (x)
    • This girl was crying while asking Colin a question and ran down to hug her (x)
  • Most awkward scene with Jen:When he knocks himself out. W/ his stunt dbl. He had to kiss her I had to kiss her. It was awkward lol (x)
  • If he didn’t find emma, killing rumple would be his happy ending (x)
  • At the start of the panel, someone said “hey, gorgeous!” & Colin looked around & said “who are you talking to?” (x)
  • Colin said he’d be in Les Mis if he could be in any musical (x)
  • Colin knows a few bits and pieces about s7 and wants to see his relationship with Henry (x)
    • Colin said he’s most excited to see how Killian and Henry’s relationship has developed since becoming his step dad (x)
  • Hook and belle have a good friendship, he would look out for belle (x)
  • “Gideon……he tried to kill my wife.” (x)
  • Hook and Rumple……its complicated (x)
  • If Captain Hook had a Starbucks drink, what would its name be? Colin: “pirates booty?” (x)
  • The rings he had for the wedding were more for the sincerity of the moment (x)
  • Hook would be a dog person (x)
  • Colin started talking about how much he loves Buckley and how he brings him to set (x)
  • “Have I pulled any pranks. No, I’m a consummate professional.” (x)
  • Josh Dallas is apparently a prankster according to Colin (x)
  • Colin likes the guyliner over the leather pants (x)
  • His fave scene with Josh is where josh attacked king George (x)
    • Colin’s favorite scene with Josh was when Charming tried to attack George and Hook stopped him (x)
  • “But one thing is for sure love, with you I have everything.” Is his fave line from that song (x)
  • He didn’t think he would play Hook. He sees Hook as the Peter Pan disney version (x)
  • Colin thanks us for supporting the show, what an amazing (x)
    • Colin is thanking everyone for getting Once to S7 (x)
  • Colins fave episode is his first episode (x)
  • Colin said Robert Carlyle is one of his all-time favorite actors! (x)
  • Colin was a bit shocked when he found out he killed Charmings dad (x)
    • Colin liked the killing charmings dad plot because it shows how much he changed (x)
  • Colins fave Hook to play was old fat hook (x)
  • He loves playing pirate hook and he enjoyed playing dark!hook (x)
  • He would like to be remembered as a good father and husband outside of acting (x)
  • Colin said his grandmother’s love of theater influenced him to become an actor (x)
  • Colin did his Hook voice ahhh (x)
  • Colin said he had a great time working with Jen (x)
    • He likes working with everyone on the cast (x)
    • “Who’s your favorite actor/actress to work with?” “You’re going to get me in trouble” -Colin (x)
  • Colin said no to Hook having a mustache (x)
  • Colin says he stands differently when he wears Hook’s pirate outfits because the jacket is “so bloody heavy” (x)
  • If he wasn’t an actor, he would like to he a musician or an artist/painter (x)
  • Colin sometimes forgets to take off his make-up after filming so he’ll like go to the grocery store with his eyeliner still on (x)
  • “I’ve been lucky I’m playing this hugely layered character. I’ve been blessed I’ve been able to do that.” (x)
  • “What things do you have in common with Hook?” “I look like him.” (x)
    • “I have more in common with Emmas hook.” (x)
  • Colin’s advice to his kids and younger people is to always be honest. And believe in yourself. (x)
  • Hook’s defining moment to from villain to hero was when he sacrificed himself when he was Dark One (x)
  • “I should get my own line (of eyeliner)” - Colin (x)
  • Colin sings the musical songs in the shower (x)
  • “Emma helped him most of all because he changed for her,he wanted to do everything he could so he can be a better man and husband.” (x)
  • Colin likes making people cry  speaking about acting (x)
  • He likes being able to transport people from their lives and into a completely different place (x)
  • He’s speaking french now (x) And speaking irish! (x)

Videos:

(x) credits pic to @captainswansource

(x)

German movies Part 1

Hey guys! I noticed how many people on this website are learning German or want to learn it. It is my mother tongue and I love German cinema. We all know that movies help to improve language skills, so I made a list about my favorite German films and some must-sees! I hope you enjoy these films!

  • Keinohrhasen (the main actor is problematic IRL and also in this movie but I still like it, a journalist has to work in a day care center because he fucked up Vladimir Klitschko’s party, he meets the girl he used to bully when he was a teenager and then they fall in love… this movie is so typical for that director lmao)
  • Zweiohrküken (the same characters as in Keinohrhasen, they move in together and it’s a mess, also the guy’s ex affair wants him back and the woman’s ex boyfriend - whose dick she describes as the eiffel tower - is back in the city and wants to be with her again, drama drama drama, cute, typical German rom-com)
  • Anatomie (very bloody! about a girl who wants to become a doctor, creepy things happen at her summer med school)
  • Die wilden Hühner (a kids’ movie based on famous books, a cute girl gang wants to save a few chicken from a member’s granny who wants to kill and freeze them, very cute film)
  • (T)raumschiff surprise (gay people in space, ICONIC)
  • Fack ju Göhte (supposed to mean Fuck you Goehte, a criminal pretends to be a teacher, great comedy, sexy main actor, CHANTAL CRY LESS NOISY!)
  • Good bye, Lenin (iconic movie, a woman was in coma for 8 months and her son makes her believe the GDR still exists, awesome soundtrack, great story, cute couple, very moving)
  • Die Welle (a teacher makes a social experiment about fascism with his class and it goes wrong!! a must-see!)
  • Pünktchen und Anton (adaption of a famous novel, cute movie for children but I’m in my twenties and I still love it, a rich girl and a poor boy become friends)
  • Die dunkle Seite des Mondes (don’t take drugs guys, just don’t! this movie will show you why! the main character goes crazy - but is it just because he took drugs? find out!!)
  • Jeune Homme ((Swiss)German and French film about a guy who makes an au pair year, gets laid by the neighbour lady and falls in love with the host parents’ oldest daughter)
  • 7 Zwerge - Männer allein im Wald (it’s like Snow White and the 7 dwarfs but very trashy, the dwarfs are big, the prince has a wild hair style and Snow White loves playing with her barbie. Ah, and the evil queen’s outfits are iconic and weird)
  • Die wilden Kerle (a kids’ movie about boys who play soccer - we all love it! EVERYTHING’S ALRIGHT AS LONG AS YOU’RE WILD! BE WILD - DANGEROUS AND WILD!)
  • Sommer (teen movie about the first love, takes place on an island, skater boy meets rich boy and they both love the same girl, teenage drama, i don’t wanna spoil but some people almost die and sth burns down)
  • Das Missenmassaker (12 girls who want to be Miss Switzerland, bitch fights 24/7 and a lot of blood because a lot of people get killed)
  • For No Eyes Only (Rear Window for teenagers, a very interesting thriller, cute main characters)
  • Homevideo (a guy films himself while masturbating, someone finds the video and then the drama starts, his family also falls apart)
  • Grosse Mädchen weinen nicht (two teenage girls, lots of feelings, sex, dangerous things)
  • Lola rennt (reminds me of The Butterfly Effect, iconic film, i don’t even wanna say more about it just watch it)
  • Who am I - Kein System ist sicher (movies about hackers with big plans and sometimes you have no idea if what you see is what is real)
  • Das Leben der Anderen (must see! fucking sad tho)
  • Cannabis (a member of the Swiss federal council who is against the legalization of weed has to consume weed because he has a problem with his eye and this helps - ofc his life changes and gets wild)
  • Die Herbstzeitlosen (4 old Swiss woman open a lingerie shop in a lil village and people freak out)
  • Grounding - Die letzten Tage der Swissair (the story behind the grounding of Swissair, the national airline of Swizzy)
  • Das Experiment (based on a true story, some people engage in a prison experiment - some are good people, others are bad people and ofc it escalates quickly)

Eternal Love (Tom x Reader)

Request from anon: Can you do a TomxF!Reader imagine where they’ve been together since they were young & they’re at the final HP Deathly Hallows part 2 premiere and she is also in HP,apart of trio, and while she does her speech with the the trio,Tom proposes to her? ❤

Ahhhhh!!! I love this idea! Thank you so much for requesting anon! *If my schedule has worked correct, it should be Friday atm*

Originally posted by k2sodone


This was it; in a few moments, you’d be sealing what had been the greatest adventure of your entire life; Harry Potter had brought you love, eternal friendship and so much happiness. You looked at yourself in the mirror, still feeling the same nerves you felt ten years ago when you were turning up to the Philosopher’s Stone premiere - now here at the Deathly Hallows Part 2 premiere, you quarrelled on how quickly time flied. You still recognised yourself yet you had matured - you had experienced so much and you were so lucky.

Practicing your mantra in an attempt to control your breathing, you took a breath for seven seconds, held it for five and exhaled for six. “Having fun?” You heard an all too familiar voice chime from behind you. You turn around, spotting Tom stood leaning against the doorway. “I’m so nervous.” You declare, walking over to him to give him a peck on the lips. “You look ravishing.” Tom comments looking you up and down with a smirk. You were wearing a navy full length dress that hugged your curves in all the right places. He was wearing a navy suit (which just so happened to be the same shade) and his hair was tousled just the way you like it. “So do you.” You replied in an oddly surprised tone. Tom hadn’t really bothered with the previous premieres, even turning up in jeans and a t-shirt to the last one. “You sound so surprised, love.” He chuckles, intertwining his fingers with yours. “I am, I didn’t think they’d make you look this sexy. Now I have to compete with all the other girls.” You chime, reaching up to peck his lips once again. “You’re not competing, Y/N, I’m already your boyfriend. Besides, you look amazing, should I be worried about any man trying to steal you away?” Tom asks with a grin on his face. You shake your head. “Of course not.” 

Keep reading

Go Go ‘Power Rangers’ (2017 Review)

Is this good? Is this bad? Will my inner-child allow me to judge this appropriately?

“Power Rangers” is a reboot of the classic 1990s action-packed children’s show “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” which in turn is based on the Japanese tokusatsu “Super Sentai Series.” It’s directed by Dean Israelite and stars a cast of young actors, as well as Bryan Cranston, Bill Hader and Elizabeth Banks. The film is set in the small, fictional town of Angel Grove, where local high school students Jason Scott, Kimberly Hart and Billy Cranston (Dacre Montgomery, Naomi Scott and RJ Cyler, respectively) are all caught up in detention. Through a series of shenanigans, they come across Trini and Zack (Becky G and Ludi Lin, respectively) as they all discover an ancient, otherworldly construct. It’s there where they meet Zordon (Cranston) and his robot assistant Alpha 5 (voiced by Hader), and attain the responsibility of becoming a powerful team known as the Power Rangers, and to stop the destruction of an ancient, powerful witch known as Rita Repulsa (Banks). 

This is the absolute perfect “what if” movie. The answer to “what if they remade ‘Power Rangers’ for adults” question. This is the film we asked for, albeit cautiously. We really owe it to franchises such as the “Transformers” series, because without them, this film would be seen as an impossible reach.

Being a millennial, I was very much a child when “Power Rangers” had its long television run, and I stayed true through each incarnation, from “Mighty Morphin” to “Lightspeed Rescue,” and considered myself a retired fan after “Dino Thunder” (I was already in middle school at the time). So yes, shameful as it is, I know my shit. As you can see, I want this to be good. But was it?

Yes. Surprisingly, it was pretty good. It’s not shockingly “I thought this was going to be shit but it ended up being amazingly amazing” good. It’s just good.

Here’s one thing that the film does better than the TV show: the acting. In a great departure from the “Saved by the Bell” mood that the 90s actors gave us, we now have grounded, realistic, rebellious teenagers. These new actors fit the “teenagers with attitude” description way better than the 90s actors ever did. You have Montgomery as Jason, playing the rebel who ends up having to deal with the most responsibility. Scott plays Kimberly, the girl who does a good job of not just being the obligatory female casting, or the fighting damsel-in-distress, unlike the original. The dialogue between these two is usually filled with charm, whether its casual banter or a proclamation of their contempt for Angel Grove. 

But they do something different with the rest of the cast, which helps to modernize them. Cyler as Billy provides the humor and keeps the grittiness from ever getting lower and lower. Of the five teenagers, he is the one with the most charisma But he also serves to represent autistic teens everywhere. Yes, unlike the television counterpart, they made the Blue Ranger autistic, which is a pretty bold and commendable step for something based off a children’s property.

To keep the ball rolling, they then make Becky G’s Trini represent lesbians and confused, oppressed teenagers everywhere. Okay, this film had me at shedding light on autism, but encouraging more LGBT representation? Hats off to you, Lionsgate and Saban. Despite this, I found Becky G’s performance to be slightly annoying until about halfway through the movie, when they developed her much more, and gave her a more integral role in the plot. 

While I praised the rest of the cast, I’d have to drop the axe on Ludi Lin as Zack, the Black Ranger.  Compared to all these convincing performances, Lin’s is absolutely haphazard. The way he is introduced is to set up how much of a cocky outsider he is, so naturally he’s by himself. He then starts speaking to himself, which is one of my absolute biggest pet peeves in a movie. I despise movie moments where normal-functioning people start speaking or quipping to themselves, the only sensible reason being that the writers assume the audience is too dumb to know what the character is thinking. I get it if a character has schizophrenia or another mental illness, or if the words are limited to comedic inner-banter, but not in this case. He’s someone with decent social-competence and no reason to quarrel with himself, other than provide exposition to the audience.

But like Trini, I did find him to be much less annoying when he opened up. They gave him a pretty touching backstory with his own troubles, and they make his motivations really apparent. And just to keep the ball rolling, he’s also the most foreign one of the group, being bilingual, unlike the original black ranger. Now that I think about it, many of the Power Ranger series’ casts don’t feature any overtly foreign characters, apart from maybe of an alien race. 

That is precisely why this casting works. Whether or not you find these characters annoying, you can’t doubt that they’re there for a good reason, and you might even warm up to them as the movie progresses. They also help to introduce bouts of political correctness, but they aren’t preachy or condescending about it (which is really the only good way to go about political correctness). They represent people of various colors, mental states and social capabilities, showing (but not telling) that everyone is capable of extraordinary things as long as they have camaraderie.

I can’t say much about Cranston as Zordon. It’s a great homage, seeing as how Cranston has actually been a part of “Power Rangers” since the original television show, where he voiced many of the villains they face. I do love his voice-work here, and while it took some getting used to, I ended up really liking how they presented him. Rather than a chubby, floating head in a tube, they made him manifest into a wall, kind of like one of those pinpression toys. Not to mention they could have easily made him a one-dimensional character. But they went above and beyond to give him his own arc, his own set of feelings and doubts, and a world of lore behind him.

If you thought Alpha 5 was annoying in the television show, then you can rest your worries because Bill Hader fixed him up good. The original’s voice was so high-pitched and screechy; basically in typical 90s fashion (or how the 90s thought Aliens would sound like). This time, he just kind of does the same thing he did as Fear from “Inside Out,” except less screaming. His design had me slightly worried but I got used to it.

Now, Elizabeth Banks as Rita Repulsa has me split down the middle. On the one hand, I do like that at least ONE person in this entire film is trying to recall the absurdity and campiness of the original series. At the same time, I found her to be over-the-top, and incredibly outlandish compared to the rest of the grounded cast. She is guilty of overacting here, which is both a blessing and a curse. The prosthetics on her are amazing though, from both start to finish. She starts out as an outright horror character, which is something I didn’t expect to see even in the gritty version of a children’s property. 

If you kept up with me for this long, you know that a recurring theme here is that this film takes several risks that are rather uncharacteristic of a children’s property. Sure, there are hints of silliness to try and match the youthful appeal of the original, but they also throw in more mature bits of humor, about things such as drug tests and jacking off a cow (no joke). Me personally, I welcome these jokes. If anything, this is much more of a film for the adults who grew up watching “Power Rangers,” rather than children. The maturity really shines through in the form of character development and chemistry.

I must say that if you are bringing a child to watch this, keep in mind there will be mild swearing, and several mature jokes.

A common criticism (ad nauseam, pretty much) is that this film is a forced collision between two different movies. Two thirds of the movie is essentially the origin story, which focuses mainly on character development. At the same time, this is the section that appeals to the audience the most, whether you’re fans of the original or not. No one comes into anything titled “Power Rangers” and expects to feel for the characters. But through one particular scene where all the characters develop a kinship, we develop a peculiar attachment to each of them. It was at this moment that I’m glad these people are the ones I’m spending five more movies with (Yup, that’s right).

But when it sticks to the original, it definitely sticks, and that’s where the last third of the movie comes in. If you’re looking for cool looking suits fighting monsters with martial arts and gymnastics, you will get it. If you’re looking for giant robot dinosaurs battling another giant monster, you will get it. And MOST OF ALL, if you want to, at least once, hear the iconic theme song, you will get it. In all it’s pure, epic goodness.

But this is where I have to defend my appreciation for this movie, because many people will come in accusing me of being “blinded by nostalgia.” Despite having these borrowed features from the original show, there is really nothing nostalgic about it. The action here is far better than most of the show’s episodes. There is no silliness to be had apart from what would be silly by realistic standards (as opposed to having two obligatory bully characters).

Even some elements taken from the show are vastly different. Case in point: Rita, who in this film is actually getting shit done by herself rather than sitting up in some moon tower yelling at everyone.

Even the formula of the show is broken up here. Back then, everything was so fast-paced to where every time a new series was brought in, the new team of Power Rangers would unrealistically form intimate familial connection and extraordinary abilities within 20 minutes. This film actually shows you that the Power Rangers had to train for this, both physically and mentally. They didn’t just have these abilities bestowed upon them as a result of the plot rushing it together. You see them work for it, which is something I really appreciated about it.

I had to bring that up because many of the people who didn’t like this film will be quick to see reactions like mine and guilt me for “nostalgia.” But that “tone difference” that they’re faulting this for is the reason why you can’t pin nostalgia on this. All that means is that everything I liked about this film has been on its own merits, maybe (at most) perpetuated by quick little homages to the original. 

I suppose before I wrap this up I should mention one more thing. Not really a problem, but more like something I wish happened: I wish they played the theme song more. It was wonderful hearing the iconic theme song, perfectly borrowed from the 1995 film, and at the height of its “Power Ranger-ness.” But I felt that if they really were gonna throw it in there, they should have totally owned it and at least left it playing for a bit longer. If not that, then at least make an instrumental cover to play in the background during the climax, rather than GODDAMN KANYE.

This is a film that has fans and critics alike split down the middle, but it’s pretty clear that everyone who hates it is hating it for the same two reasons: (1) It has a massive tone-clash towards the end, and (2) It caters way too much toward product promotion for Krispy Kreme donuts. I do agree with the latter, make no mistake. But when I hear people complain about this tone-clash, it reminds me of people who complained about the “slow parts” of every other superhero film, whether it’s “Captain America: Civil War,” or “Batman v Superman.” Apart from being a “Power Rangers” movie, this is also an origin story film. And for something as ridiculous as “Power Rangers,” it definitely requires a slow initiation process. To get us going on a six-movie deal, the creators will have to help casual viewers acclimate to the premise, because chances are the naysayers are the ones who skipped out on this franchise as children, and therefore missed their window of opportunity. Ironic how a movie based on a children’s property requires a mature level of patience from the audience.

As I said before, if you came into this wanting to see colored suits, martial arts, explosions and giant robots, you will get it. If you’re dragged into this film but appreciate elements like character development and chemistry, you will get that too. As someone who enjoys both, I actually would go so far as to say I loved this movie. I don’t care if I’m alone on this, but I can comfortably say that I loved the “Power Rangers” movie.

Epic Movie (Re)Watch #124 - Zootopia

Spoilers below.

Have I seen it before: Yes

Did I like it then: Yes!

Do I remember it: Yes.

Did I see it in theaters: Yes.

Was it a movie I saw since August 22nd, 2009: Yes. #412.

Format: Blu-ray

1) From the very start this film is excellent storytelling. The opening scene where young Judy and her classmates clearly establishes the conflict of predator vs. prey and the biases that come from that, the film’s humor and heart, and Judy as a character.

2) My mother is an actuary. My brother is studying to be an actuary. Actuaries don’t do this.

Little Jaguar: “Today I can hunt for tax exemptions. I’m going to be an actuary!”

3) Judy’s parents (Don Lake & Bonnie Hunt) are so funny in such a sad way.

Stu: “Judy, you ever wonder how your mom and me got to be so darn happy?”

Judy: “Nope.”

Stu: “Well, we gave up on our dreams and we settled. Right, Bon?”

Bonnie: “Oh yes, that’s right Stu. We settled hard.”

4) Gideon Grey.

Originally posted by masha-russia

Gideon is a perfect example of how nothing - NOTHING - in this film is superfluous, but I’m actually going to speak on that further into the film.

5) The police academy scene gives wonderful exposition. It sets up the environment and rules of Zootopia’s various ecosystems in a way that feeds into Judy’s conflict and character.

6) Ginnifer Goodwin as Judy Hopps.

Originally posted by floppy999

Goodwin (a massive Disney fan herself) breathes perfect life into Hopps. The best voice over work is when you’re not distracted by the voice actor. When their voice and their heart match with the character so perfectly that you don’t hear - say - Kristen Bell as Anna or Mike Myers as Shrek, you only hear the character’s. Goodwin is able to balance Judy’s massive optimism and heart along with the scenes where Judy has lost those things perfectly. I don’t think anyone else could have voiced Hopps as well as Goodwin.

7) If you want to avoid a slew of bad animal puns, don’t look too hard at Judy’s iPod.

8) “Try Everything” by Shakira.

Originally posted by raddestboy

Written by Sia, Tor Erik Hermansen, and Mikkel Storleer Eriksen, the theme song which deserved an Oscar nomination captures Judy’s optimism and struggles perfectly. The song’s lyrics speak of optimism in the face of constant failure, a theme which is very relevant to Judy in the first half of the film. It also provides the perfect backdrop to the visual introduction of Zootopia as Judy enters the city on train.

9) Subtle.

Judy [after Clawhauser calls her “cute”]: “Ooh, ah, you probably didn’t know, but a bunny can call another bunny ‘cute’, but when other animals do it, that’s a little…”

Originally posted by wish-for-the-moon

10) This film really runs with the animal puns.

(GIF originally posted by @baawri)

Bogo [turning to an Elephant officer]: “Francine. Happy birthday!”

11) I love the way the filmmakers handled Judy’s office discrimination. She is treated just as a token bunny, someone who’s only there for PR. Except she was top of her class at Zootopia police academy: a difficult feat for anybody, let alone a bunny. But this just feeds into the biases Bogo already has about Judy: she’s not really that good, they just said she was because she’s a bunny. That plays into real life way more than it probably should.

12) Wow, I did not catch how entirely speciesist this line was until now:

Ice Cream Parlor Owner [to Nick]: “Look, you probably can’t read…”

Damn that’s speciesist.

13) Jason Bateman as Nick Wilde.

Originally posted by a-zootopia-fan

Remember how I said great voice over work is noted by not realizing you’re listening to a voice over artist? The same can be said of Bateman’s performance of Wilde, 100%. To start, Bateman captures Wilde’s surface level of sly con artists WONDERFULLY well. He’s devilish and charming in the same vein as Danny Ocean or Han Solo, and Bateman expresses this perfectly. But as the film progresses Bateman is also able to show off Nick’s layers. His troubled past, his occasional lack of self-worth and anger at the world. And the honest level never changes. It’s not like Bateman was hired ONLY for the slyness of Nick’s role and had to power through the rest, he’s able to do it all. It’s a great voice over for a great character.

14) The relationship between Nick & Judy is the cornerstone of this film. What I personally like about it is its honesty. There’s no BIG moment when these two meet, it’s a chance encounter which grows to conflict and then budding friendship so organically you don’t even know it’s happening.

Originally posted by surreal-teal

15) There is nothing even remotely superfluous in this film. Nick makes a comment about how he’s been running his popsicle con his whole life and that will come back to bite him in the butt later.

16) This pig is played by Josh Dallas, Ginnifer Goodwin’s onscreen partner in “Once Upon a Time” and real life husband.

17) The chase through Zootopia is an incredible amount of fun, especially when Judy and Duke get to Little Rodentia. The filmmakers are able to play with their concept in a visual entertaining and imaginative way, which in turn keeps us as the audience wrapped up in the world they’ve established.

Note: I’m going to take about Alan Tudyk as Duke later in the film, at a very specific moment.

18) Again, there is nothing superfluous in this film (a note I’m going to be making a lot):

Judy [after saving Mr. Big’s daughter]: “Love your hair.”

Mr. Big’s Daughter: “Aww, thank you!”

It is this little encounter (and, you know, the fact that Judy saved her life) that saves Judy & Nick from getting “iced” by Mr. Big later in the film.

19) Again, nothing superfluous in the film. As the “non-onions” that Duke stole end up being very important later on.

20) Disney is at its bets when it pokes fun at itself.

Bogo: “Life isn’t some cartoon musical where you sing a little musical and your insipid dreams MAGICALLY COME TRUE! So let it go.”

Originally posted by rinshi-chan

21) Can we all just take a moment to appreciate Nick’s face after Judy says she’ll arrest him for, “felony tax evasion,” after he brags to her about how he’s been running this con since he was a kid and how much money he makes?

(GIF originally posted by @animations-daily)

22) Again, with the idea that nothing in this film is superfluous: Judy’s recording pen becomes very important as the movie goes on.

23) Only Tommy Chong could play this character.

(GIF source unknown [if this is your GIF please let me know].)

Like there’s a chance he’s not even reading from a script, they just had Tommy Chong come in and told him what the movie was about and he just started talking.

24) This is the funniest part of the whole film, in my opinion.

Originally posted by officialmoviegoer

The entire DMV scene plays well not only with the concept established by the film of an animal society in a way which is funny on its own, but the continuing conflict of Judy’s eagerness, Flash’s slowness, and Nick’s desire to throw a monkey wrench into the whole thing leads to amazing comedy.

25) Did you know Kristen Bell is in this film?

Originally posted by musicallyfoxypokemon

Bell landed the role not only because of her working with Disney on Frozen, but also because she is a noteworthy sloth enthusiast (as seen on “Ellen”).

26) It is nice to see Nick freak out when he realizes he and Judy are in Mr. Big’s limo, as it shows us a part of him we haven’t gotten to look at much in the film so far.

27) Maurice LaMarche as Mr. Big.

(GIF originally posted by @rocktheholygrail)

LaMarche is a noted voice over actor known primarily for his roles as Brain on “Pinky & The Brain”, various characters including Calculon on “Futurama”, and Mr. Freeze in the Batman Arkham series of video games. Here, we get to hear the veteran voice over artist do his best high pitched Brando impression.

28) This film has its fair share of nice surprises, details and twists which keeps you on your toes. The earliest of these is the revelation that the missing mammal Judy & Nick are looking for - Mr. Otterton - was in fact the one who attacked the limo driver (and not that he was the one attacked, as originally perceived).

29) This scene gives me life.

Bogo [after Judy’s witness disappears]: Two days to find the otter, or you quit. That was the deal. [Holding out hand] Badge.

Judy: But sir, we…

Bogo: Badge!

[Judy starts to turn in her badge]

Nick: Uh… no.

Chief Bogo: What did you say, fox?

Nick Wilde: Sorry, what I said was… NO! She will not be giving you that badge.[Bogo flinches] Look, you gave her a… a… a clown vest and a three wheel joke mobile and two days to solve a case you guys haven’t cracked in two weeks? Yeah, no wonder she needed to get help from a fox. None of you guys were gonna help her, were you? [Bogo starts to speak but Nick cuts him off] Here’s the thing, chief. You gave her the 48 hours, so technically we still have… 10 left, to find our Mr. Otterton. And that’s exactly what we’re gonna do. So, if you’ll excuse us, we have a very big lead to follow and a case to crack. Good day.

30) And then there’s this…

I saw this film twice in theaters and both times I was tearing up during Nick’s backstory. Anyone who has ever been bullied as a kid for being different will relate at least a little bit to what Nick went through. And it is this scene when Nick is at his most honesty with Judy, when they become pretty good friends and form a trust with each other.

31) NOTHING IN THIS FILM IS SUPERFLUOUS!!!! NOT EVEN A BLINK OR YOU’LL MISS IT STICKY NOTE ON BELLWETHER’S DESK!!!!

32) I did not think a Disney movie would make me jump like this (stop at 2:11).

33) This is incredibly rare for me, as someone who sees more than 60 films in theaters a year, but after Nick & Judy found the missing mammals and had the mayor arrested I had absolutely NO idea where the film was going after that. At all. I love it!

34) Nick’s face when Judy links the savage animals to being a predator…

(GIF source unknown [if this is your GIF please let me know].)

35) I had a film student criticize this film not based on the merits of its story or character’s or anything, but because they didn’t understand the metaphor. He noted that it’s not a clean comparison between white people and minorities and that’s exactly the point. This film is not about the people in power vs the people who aren’t, because who’s in power? The mayor may be a lion but the most biased character in the film - Chief Bogo - is prey. Bias goes all around and it can infect anybody, no matter what you think. Even Judy, for all her merits, is biased. She carries around fox repellent all the time and even has this line:

Judy: “It’s not like a bunny can go savage.”

That’s what I love about this film. It’s universal. It’s not about one real life society, it is about all societies everywhere and how bias can infect them and taint them and it’s up to us to work against that.

36) Fun fact: I had no idea otters were predators before seeing this film.

37) Gideon Grey returns.

Originally posted by klaus-baudelarie

If only all childhood bullies were like that, but again it gets to my oft-repeated point that nothing in this film is superfluous. Gideon could have easily been the one note bully from Judy’s youth who gave her the motivation to prove him wrong, but he comes back 15 years later in the most perfect way. She sees that people can change and that people who are good now are not always good (Gideon when he was younger, Judy when she was biased). It is a really important moment for her that was established all the way in the first ten minutes of this movie. I love that.

38) Judy’s apology to Nick and the way he handles it is something I truly love about this movie and their friendship as a whole.

And then I really love the little joke at the end about Judy trying to get to the pen and can’t help but wonder: was that written in the script? Was it Jason Bateman’s improv that made it into the film? It’s just so natural I must know!

39) Okay, I think this is the last time I will give this note, BUT NOTHING IN THIS MOVIE IS SUPERFLUOUS!!! This is most apparent to me when Nick does a little thing like expressing how much he likes the berries on Judy’s farm and it becomes so important to the plot latter when they switched out those berries with the Night Howlers in Bellwether’s dart gun.

40) THE BOOTLEG MOVIES!!!!

(GIFs originally posted by @bridgetjones)

41) And it’s followed up by this!

Both characters are voiced by Alan Tudyk. Because Disney just can’t let that one slide, can they? I love it.

42) Same Duke. Same.

(GIFs originally posted by @baawri)

43) The sticky note on Bellwether’s phone earlier was for Doug, the guy who mixes the night howler drug that makes animals go savage (this is the same drug who’s key ingredient was mixed from the non-onions Duke stole earlier in the film, FOR Doug).

44) At one point Doug - who is dressed in a yellow radiation suit and makes drugs for a living - lets his client know that “Woolter and Jesse” have arrived.

Originally posted by knurd-dna-denots

And yes, they did that on purpose.

45) The entire subway chase sequence is really great, because it is based heavily on the idea of action = consequence. A ram is running at the door, he gets through and hits another ram. The train goes too fast into a turn, it tips over and Judy/Nick are up a creek. It all works very nicely

46) Honestly, I didn’t figure out Bellwether was the bad guy until just before it was revealed the first time I saw this.

Originally posted by lostchel

47) Bellwether’s line about, “Fear ALWAYS works!” to keep the people in check should not be as relevant in 2017 as it is.

48) Okay, one thing I need to know: Bellwether is in jail, Mayor Lionheart is in jail, and Chief Bogo is still the police chief…SO WHO’S MAYOR NOW!?!?!?

Originally posted by justalittletumblweed

49) I know this film was pretty much a buddy cop movie, but I would be totally fine with a buddy cop movie where Nick is actually a cop.

Originally posted by blueberrycarrots

Lethal Weapon where Nick is Mel Gibson and Judy is…Danny Glover? Okay, that comparison doesn’t really work, but you get me!

50) And of course…

Originally posted by livelovecaliforniadreams


I honestly think Zootopia may be a perfectly written film, and that is not something I say lightly. I made it clear above how I find nothing in the film superfluous, which is an incredible feat I think. And they did it in a way that was never boring, with entertaining characters, an intriguing mystery, and a fun world. Zootopia may be my favorite Disney animated feature film, and it’s definitely my favorite of the “Modern Era” we’re in now (The Princess and the Frog - Present). Just a great, great, great film which deserved its Best Animated Picture win at the Oscars. A true treat all around.

6

‘A Dream Come True and a Career Curtailed:

The True-Life Fairy Tale of Adriana Caselotti, the Voice of Snow White’

by Brian Sibley, via Independent.co.uk

If the animated princess in the fairy tale represented a child-like innocence and naive goodness Adriana Caselotti - even well into her old age - still embodied those qualities. In our more cynical age, there were those who dismissed her as eccentric, or, worse, as plain batty. But she preserved and defended the image of the character she helped to create and took great joy in being loved for what was a unique contribution to cinema history.

She was 18 years old when Walt Disney embarked on a revolutionary project: the world’s first feature-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Not only had no one attempted such a film, but no one knew whether audiences would sit through a 90-minute “cartoon”. However, Disney believed that as long as his artists could create characters with believable personalities, the film would succeed.

The search for someone to speak and sing for Snow White began in 1934 when Disney’s casting director, Roy Scott, sought the advice of Guido Caselotti, a Los Angeles singing teacher. His younger daughter, Adriana, picked up the telephone extension while they were speaking and heard Scott asking her father if he knew of a little girl who could speak as a child and yet could sing operatic-style songs.

The eavesdropper immediately interrupted the conversation with a request that she might try out for the part, followed by a demonstration of her best coloratura trills. She was the first person to be auditioned for the role.

Since the part was intended for a 14-year-old, Adriana Caselotti knocked two years off her age and told Disney’s musical director, Frank Churchill, that she was only 16. When she sight-read Churchill’s song Someday My Prince Will Come, Walt Disney (who was listening behind a screen, so as to concentrate on the voice without being distracted by the singer’s appearance) felt sure that he had found his Snow White. That said, no fewer than 148 other hopefuls were auditioned!

It was a remarkable vocal performance: her singing was exquisite and her rendition of the dialogue was full of naivete, gentleness and compassion. She was paid $20 a day for her work on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and her total earnings for the film were just $970, although the film went on to earn millions of dollars for Disney. It was only when, uninvited, she managed to sneak into the film’s rapturously-received premiere, in December 1937, that she realized she had taken part in something that was destined for enduring fame. However, none of the actors who spoke for the characters was credited on the film.

For Adriana Caselotti, being Snow White was a once-in-a-lifetime job; in different circumstances it might have brought her great stardom. Jack Benny wanted her as a guest star on his radio show, but Disney vetoed the appearance, writing, “I’m sorry, but that voice can’t be used anywhere. I don’t want to spoil the illusion of Snow White.” And, whilst Caselotti always hoped that Disney would find her another screen role, he wisely knew that the voice of Snow White was unique and should never be used again. Her only other cinematic contribution, for which she was paid $100, was to sing the falsetto line “Wherefore Art Thou, Romeo", in the Tin Man’s song in The Wizard of Oz.

Later, Disney sent her on film-promotion tours, dressed as Snow White and accompanied by Pinto Colvig, who spoke for the dwarfs Sleepy and Grumpy. Adriana Caselotti confided to me that on one tour she and Colvig had a fling - the idea of a romance between Snow White and Grumpy is certainly an intriguing one.

In 1938, Caselotti and the actor who voiced Prince Charming unsuccessfully sued Disney and RCA (for $200,000 and $100,000, respectively) for a share of soundtrack-record profits. After this episode, though, she appeared to have been fairly loyal to Disney for the rest of her life.

Gracious and generous-hearted, Caselotti lived out the role of Snow White for the rest of her life: singing Whistle While You Work to strangers in the street, allowing herself to be photographed in the famous costume and permitting the public cataloging of her marriages to four Prince Charmings.

But despite making only one movie, Adriana Caselotti nevertheless secured for herself a kind of immortality. The last time I left her, she remarked that Snow White would never die; then, with a laugh, she added: “And when I’m in that coffin, d'you know what you’ll hear? Someday My Prince Will Come, because you see my voice will live for ever.”

Adriana Caselotti, actress: born in Bridgeport, Connecticut on May 6, 1916; died in Los Angeles January 18, 1997. R.I.P. Adriana!

The more I think about it, the more I think the main thing that ‘went wrong’ with Andromeda is that it plays everything so safe. I still like the game, but that is the one overarching issue that stopped me from enjoying it as much as I wanted to.

This is a new galaxy; they could have done anything, but it all feels so utterly familiar.

The story starts at the wrong point in the time line

The biggest mistake they made, story wise, was making us come into the galaxy at the point that we did. I will never for the life of me understand why they took a game that was going to be about exploration and how ‘we’re the aliens now’ and not let us be the first humans to arrive in Andromeda.

Just start the game at that point. Before the uprising, before the outposts, before the Nexus is half-built. Have us truly be the first humans the Angara meet. Have us struggle to understand each other, and slowly win their trust, only to lose it when the Uprising happens and they see a darker side to humans.

How devastating would it be to have worked to gain their trust, gain Jaal’s trust, and then see it all get swept away by events out of our control?


This way we also get more chances to bond to Alec, as he’ll be around for longer than 2 minutes. Think about establishing those first outposts on Eos with Alec, only to see them fail disastrously with us, the pathfinder team, carrying that guilt with them.

This also means we’ll see the Nexus fail, see Garson murdered (not entirely clear on the timeline for that tbh). And eventually we will have to see characters we know turn against us during the Uprising itself!

And if they have to get rid of the dad, he could die during the Uprising (adding a personal touch to having to deal with the Exiles), or hell, maybe he joins them. 


As it is now, it just feels like we missed a large part of interesting narrative in Andromeda. We’re made pathfinder in 2 seconds and succeed from the word go. There are obstacles to getting the outposts up and running, but no real struggle. Another consequence of setting the story 18 months (I think it’s 18) from when the first people arrived is that it robs us of being the first.

(I’m also not entirely clear on why the Nexus had to be there first, because it can’t function without Outposts, they need a pathfinder to find outposts, but the arc’s had the pathfinders and they were meant to arrive later on? Also, no one on the Hyperion says they arrived too late, but on the Nexus they say they thought everyone was dead, which seems to indicate they were waiting for longer than they thought they had to? I might be missing something here.)

Planets are not inviting to explore

As it stands, it just adds more familiarity into a game that already suffers from taking too few risks.

Everything from the planets to the wild life to who we encounter feels so safe. Storybeats are repeated from the original trilogy, enemies as well. On four of the planets we already see a lot of milky way equipment/ milky way species. And even Kandara Port (though I like the design), which was built by the Angara feels like it wouldn’t be out of place in me2.

All the planets are a bit of a let down when it comes to how not-alien they feel, excepting Havarl and arguably habitat 7, they don’t feel that alien. And the frustrating thing is, this isn’t filmed on location, they’re not constrained by planet Earth; they could have gone all out. 

Besides not feeling alien the planets also feel so… dead. I know there is a bit of an in game reason for this, but 1. they created the reason 2. I don’t think that’s the reason.

Every planet gets one or two pieces of plant life, looking only slightly alien from what we see on earth. The rest is desert, snow desert, almost barren ground. Throw in a lot of rocks. And 4 different animals, all just reskins of that same set from other planets. (Even those acidic lakes are things we can find right here.) And why do we still not have a weather or day/ night cycle? It’s one thing if you just work with smaller hubs, but bragging about your huge maps and then have them be utterly static seems a bit weird.

We also only get one alien city. One, and it’s tiny. At least it feels more like a city than Val Royeaux, but not by much. I do like Aya’s design though. We do see some smaller camps? settlements? of the Angara, but if they were such a presence in the cluster until 80 years back when the Kett arrived, where are the ruins to their civilization? The abandoned cities of the Angara?

The Jardaan certainly piqued my interest, but what do we really see of them? The vaults, that one giant starship, not-Meridian, and Meridian itself, which is one of the few places that was inviting to explore so of course we couldn’t. Did they just not leave any other marks on the planets except those things and the ‘points of interest’ (that are not interesting)?

All we really have to interrupt these huge boring maps, clearly designed to only rush through with your Nomad, is some random fights (the same two variations I think) and ‘points of interest’, except there’s never anything of interest except some remnant to kill and a container? After a while I just gave up checking them out tbh, so please point out any great ones you found.

There are of course a lot of sidequests thrown in, some of them I found pretty fun and a huge improvement on da:i, but they don’t invite you to explore. The planet itself isn’t worth exploring so when doing a sidequest you just rush to the point you have to get. In other games, games that do this concept well, you set your quest and then while going there get distracted by things you find out in the world. Here that happened maybe a few times, and usually it was because I came across a point for another quest and someone hailed me. It was never because I saw something that piqued my interest and I went over there and it had something fun to do.

A lack of new species, and disappointing returning aliens

They never showed a lot of the milky way species and the ones we did see lacked diversity. The just picked one head morph - or two in the case of Turians where the females have different facial structure - and slapped on some paint. I expect more not less from a newer game. The Asari were the most jarring - to the point I avoided Kerri because she has Lexi’s face and it’s just ridiculous. But the Salarians have just as little diversity. Google salarians in mass effect and you’ll see they did so much more with them in the original trilogy. And I have to say, there were too many Turians with white faces,  a few of them important characters as well, I still mix up Kandros and Avitus.

And what do we get in exchange for all the species we don’t see return and the diversity that’s gone? One new species. One. I love the Angara, but I can’t help but be disappointed that we travel to a new galaxy only to discover one new race. Unless we count throw away enemy the collectors .2 the Kett. But really, they only brought back 4 of the original trilogy’s races and still didn’t have enough resources to add some diversity to Andromeda? Really? We just get the Angara…

Finally…

I would just have scrapped the giant maps, and gone for smaller but denser packed ones, like Havarl and Habitat 7. Add much more plant life and animal life and real diversity in those two, to all the planets. And make them more alien.

Have no more than one desert planet, I vote Elaaden as it was the best desert, and stick more sunken ruins in it that have actual things to discover about the Jardaan. And make that the only planet so huge that you absolutely have to use the Nomad.

Make Kadara much smaller, with much more lakes so it looks more like a deadly lake planet.

If we have to have a snow planet, make it more original than a white reskin of a desert planet. Maybe we have to drive in giant ice caves, maybe we don’t even get to walk on the surface, maybe the Angara have buried themselves underground in ruins of a old Jardaan city.

And this is just sticking to the planets in game, but they should just have scrapped all of them except Havarl and gone much more alien than they have.

I still like the game, I just think there was a lot of potential there they never bothered to explore. All in all it just feels like they played it safe. Maybe that’s a reaction to the backlash after me3′s endings, but I think it’s where they failed the game the most, and for me it leaves the game in ‘if only’ limbo.

anonymous asked:

what films would you rec for a bollywood begginer?

Oh gosh. There are so many good ones, but let me see.

Here are some films I would consider watching. 

  1. Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge - When Raj and Simran first met on an inter-rail holiday in Europe, it wasn’t exactly love at first sight.
  2. Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara - Three friends decide to turn their fantasy vacation into reality after one of their number becomes engaged.
  3. Jab We Met - A depressed wealthy businessman finds his life changing after he meets a spunky and care-free young woman. 
  4. Swades - A successful Indian scientist returns to an Indian village to take his nanny to America with him and in the process rediscovers his roots.
  5. Dil Chanta Hai - Three inseparable childhood friends are just out of college. Nothing comes between them - until they each fall in love, and their wildly different approaches to relationships creates tension. 
  6. Lagaan: Once Upon  Time in  India - The people of a small village in Victorian India stake their future on a game of cricket against their ruthless British rulers.
  7. Highway - Right before her wedding, a young woman finds herself abducted and held for ransom. As the initial days pass, she begins to develop a strange bond with her kidnapper.
  8. Kahaani - A pregnant woman’s search for her missing husband takes her from London to Kolkata, but everyone she questions denies having ever met him.
  9. Kai Po Che -Three friends growing up in India at the turn of the millennium set out to open a training academy to produce the country’s next cricket stars. 
  10. The Lunchbox - A mistaken delivery in Mumbai’s famously efficient lunchbox delivery system connects a young housewife to an older man in the dusk of his life as they build a fantasy world together through notes in the lunchbox. 
  11. English Vinglish - A quiet, sweet tempered housewife endures small slights from her well-educated husband and daughter everyday because of her inability to speak and understand English. 
  12. Lootera - An aristocrat’s daughter falls in love with a visiting archaeologist, but he holds a secret that could drive them apart.
  13. Fitoor - Modern adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations; a poor but talented boy falls in love with a girl from an affluent family.
  14. Queen - A Delhi girl from a traditional family sets out on a solo honeymoon after her marriage gets canceled.
  15. Rustom - In 1959, a decorated naval officer is accused of murdering his wife’s lover. 
  16. Dangal - Former wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat and his two wrestler daughters struggle towards glory at the Commonwealth Games in the face of societal oppression.
  17. Pink - When three young women are implicated in a crime, a retired lawyer steps forward to help them clear their names. (Warning: rape/assault)
  18. Hindi Medium - A couple from Chandni Chowk aspire to give their daughter the best education and thus be a part of and accepted by the elite of Delhi.
  19. Trapped - A man gets stuck in an empty high rise without food, water or electricity.
  20. Badrinath Ki Dulhania - Badrinath Bansal from Jhansi and Vaidehi Trivedi from Kota belong to small towns but have diametrically opposite opinions on everything. This leads to a clash of ideologies, despite both of them recognizing the goodness in each other. (Although I would caution watching due to sensitive topics discussed in the movie).
  21. Dear Zindagi - Kaira is a budding cinematographer in search of a perfect life. Her encounter with Jug, an unconventional thinker, helps her gain a new perspective on life. She discovers that happiness is all about finding comfort in life’s imperfections.
  22. Raees -Criticizing the prohibition of alcohol in Gujarat, this film unfolds the story of a clever bootlegger, whose business is challenged by a tough cop.
  23. Lipstick Under My Burqa - Set in the crowded lanes of small town India, a burkha-clad college girl struggles with issues of cultural identity and her aspirations to be a pop singer. A young two-timing beautician, seeks to escape the claustrophobia of her small town. An oppressed housewife and mother of three, lives the alternate life of an enterprising saleswoman. And a 55 year old widow rediscovers her sexuality through a phone romance. Trapped in their worlds, they claim their desires through secret acts of rebellion.
  24. Neerja - The story of the courageous Neerja Bhanot, who sacrificed her life while protecting the lives of 359 passengers on the Pan Am flight 73 in 1986. The flight was hijacked by a terrorist organization.
  25. Namastey London - A man takes his thoroughly-British daughter to his home country, India. There, he arranges her marriage to someone she considers a fool. The daughter attempts to outwit them, but the groom quietly and patiently hatches his own plan.
  26. Kapoor and Sons - A story revolving around a dysfunctional family of 2 brothers who visit their family and discover that their parents marriage is on the verge of collapse,the family is undergoing a financial crunch and much more as the drama unfolds.
  27. Taare Zameen Paar - An eight-year-old boy is thought to be a lazy trouble-maker until the new art teacher has the patience and compassion to discover the real problem behind his struggles in school.
  28. Piku - A quirky comedy about the relationship between a daughter and her aging father, whose eccentricities drive everyone crazy.
  29. Barfi! - A charming deaf-mute prankster’s  bittersweet relationship with two women, one is autistic, turns his life upside-down. 
  30. Omkara - A politically-minded enforcer’s misguided trust in his lieutenant leads him to suspect his wife of infidelity in this adaptation of Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’.
  31. Wake Up SId - Sid Mehra (Ranbir Kapoor) is a young man living in Mumbai who benefits from the indulgence of his parents. After graduating from university, he makes a stab at working in his father’s business, but lasts only a week. He then meets Aisha (Konkona Sen Sharma), an aspiring writer from Calcutta. Sid helps her get settled in the city and then wants to take things further – but Aisha isn’t interested because of Sid’s slacker personality. Will her rejection serve as a wake-up call for Sid?
  32. Jodhaa Akbar - Epic romance, set in 16th-century India, about the love story between Jalaluddin Mohammad Akbar, the Mughal Emperor of Hindustan, and Rajput princess Jodhaa. In order to extend his empire, Akbar agrees to a marriage of alliance to young and fiery Jodhaa but soon realizes he has to defend his choice of bride as his courtiers voice their displeasure at the idea of their Muslim Emperor marrying a Hindu.
  33. Devdas - After his wealthy family prohibits him from marrying the woman he is in love with, Devdas Mukherjee’s life spirals further and further out of control as he takes up alcohol and a life of vice to numb the pain.
  34. Bajirao Mastani - In 16th century India, undefeated warrior Bajirao was bestowed with the title of Prime Minister, and became the greatest weapon of his Empire. Bajirao recieves a rider with an urgent request to save a fort under siege by the Moguls, Bajirao’s greatest opponents. He refuses initially, but is mesmerized by the rider, a beautiful Rajput princess who rode for days to seek him out. Despite Bajirao’s best efforts, he cannot deny his love for Princess Mastani. She pursued him to Pune, where Bajirao’s family promptly sent her away. Bajirao faced great opposition from his family, his people, and his priests. Every attempt is made to separate them, but they always find their way to each other, finally paying the ultimate price in the name of love.
  35. Kabhi Kushi Kabhi Gham - Rahul, the adoptive son of business magnate Yash Raichand, feels eternal gratitude to his father for rescuing him from a life of poverty. Yet, when Yash forbids his love of poor Anjali, Rahul marries her and moves to London with new wife and sister-in-law, Pooja, breaking the heart of his mother. Ten years later, Rahul’s younger brother comes to London intent on brokering peace between father and son.
  36. Dil Se - The clash between love and ideology is portrayed in this love story between a radio executive and a beautiful revolutionary
  37. Damini - The theme revolves around the character Damini who represents truth and innocence. After her marriage in renowned wealthy family, Damini happens to see a cruel act done by her brother-in-law. She wants the victim to get justice, but the family including her husband oppose her, which leads her to leave the house. Soon she is helped by a drunkard, an ex-advocate, who helps her in all respect to reach to her aim and therefore justice.
  38. Mrityudand: The Death Sentence - Mrityudand is a film commentary on the social and the gender injusticeA woman (Madhuri Dixit), her sister-in-law (Shabana Azmi) a laborer (Om Puri) and others unite to stand up against a hard-nosed businessman.
  39. Sadma (stars Sridevi) - One night, Sadma is in a car accident, which leaves her with amnesia. She runs away from the hospital but ends up in a brothel, where she meets a friendly schoolteacher.
  40. Rangeela - A middle class young woman, who dreams of Bollywood fame, is caught in a love triangle between her childhood friend and a famous actor.
  41. Ek Hasina The - A woman falls for a charming and mysterious businessman. The whirlwind romance turns sour when she is framed for his underworld crimes. Now, finally out of prison she is ready for sweet revenge.
  42. Anand - The story of a terminally ill man who wishes to live life to the full before the inevitable occurs, as told by his best friend.
  43. Mere Brother Ki Dulhan - A quirky rom-com where Kush finds the ideal Indian bride Dimple for his brother Luv and a series of comical and unpredictable events follow.

I know that the question is asking for Bollywood films, but I need to go ahead and include two of Indian Cinema’s post popular films ever released. 

  1. Bahubali - In ancient India, an adventurous and daring man becomes involved in a decade’s old feud between two warring people.
  2. Bahubali 2 - When Shiva, the son of Bahubali, learns about his heritage, he begins to look for answers. His story is juxtaposed with past events that unfolded in the Mahishmati Kingdom.

Not Bollywood films, but these are recommended by our followers:

  1. Ok Kamani (Similar to Ok Jaanu) - Two young lovers are compatible in every way - they even agree that marriage is futile. However, their emotions are not so easily managed, especially when they witness the unconditional love of the older couple with whom they live.
  2. Alaipayuthey - A computer expert and a crusading doctor marry in secret, then deal with death and trauma.

If you ever need more recommendations. Just shoot a message at our inbox. And I will update the list as they come.

- Sonia

Epic Movie (Re)Watch #94 - The Book of Life

Spoilers below.

Have I seen it before: Yes.

Did I like it then: Yes.

Do I remember it: Yes.

Did I see it in theaters: Yes.

Was it a movie I saw since August 22nd, 2009: Yes. #325.

Format: Blu-ray.

1) I watched this about a week ago - on the actual Day of the Dead - but didn’t have time to write it because I live in Chicago and the Cubs won their first World Series in 108 years. So my priorities were a little different than usual.

2) Anyone here a fan of “El Tigre”?

Originally posted by fire-miracle

Well the creator of that show - Jorge R. Gutierrez - was the writer/director of this film! Some El Tigre characters even cameo in the film’s opening, but you have to REALLY look for them.

Originally posted by oescafandronasociedade

3) The framing device of this film (a bunch of kids at a museum being told a story) is a classic fairytale/magical realism device that can be found in films such as Big Fish. It also gives the film a plot driven reason for it’s unique animation style (the characters looking like wooden figures).

Originally posted by -bawsten

4) This film has some really great humor.

Vendor Boy: “Churros! Churros! (A bird poops on the churros.) Frosted churros!”

5) I will talk about La Muerte and Xibalba as individual characters in just a second, but for now I want to focus on their relationship.

Originally posted by gifsbyrosie

I’m not overly familiar with Day of the Dead lore outside of this film, but I think the idea of having the ruler of The Land of the Remembered (La Muerte, everything good and wonderful in the world) and the ruler of the Land of the Forgotten (Xibalba, everything that is negative in the world) be lovers is a great idea. Their relationship is tense, volatile, and can be filled with conflict, but never is it abusive. Never is it hateful. You always get a great sense of love between these two and that’s what makes it work.

6) Ron Perlman as Xibalba.

Originally posted by clusterstruck

These two wouldn’t work so well together if they couldn’t stand on their own as characters. And the work so well in that field because of equal parts writing, character design, and voice over work. Ron Perlman is a regular collaborator of Guillermo Del Toro’s, the executive producer on this film, and has worked in a number of animated project before (including VP Lancer in “Danny Phantom” and Clayface in “Batman: The Animated Series”). Perlman brings a roguish charm to all his characters, even when it’s just his voice. He’s interesting, rough, and just likable! And he makes Xibalba all those things. You’re never particularly rooting against him, even though he’s technically the villain. You’re just entranced whenever he’s on screen.

7) Kate del Castillo as La Muerte.

Originally posted by beanarie

American audiences are not as familiar with Kate del Castillo as they are with Ron Perlman, although she is one of Mexico’s most acclaimed popular actresses. As Perlman does with Xibalba, Castillo brings genuine charm, likability, and charisma to La Muerte. As well as an added fierceness that lets you know this undead ruler can keep her own when head-to-head with her darker lover. You definitely get the vibe that La Muerte is the more dangerous of these two but also the kinder, and so much of that relies on Castillo’s performance.

8) Manolo, Maria, and Joaquin.

Originally posted by br0ken-5tring5

We first meet these characters and get a sense of their relationship as children, and it’s great. Yes Manolo and Joaquin both love Maria, but they’re friends first. ALL of them are friends! Later in the film Joaquin and Manolo remain friends even when vying for Maria’s affections, and they are friends with Maria before they are lovers. And I think it’s driven home by this statement from Maria as a child:

Maria [after Manolo and Joaquin fight over who’s she is]: “I belong to no one!”

They don’t belong to each other, they chose to be friends. They chose to be with together because they genuinely like each other. I love that.

9) A huge theme of this film is also seen in Maria’s, “I belong to no one!” line and that is the theme of being true to yourself.

Both Joaquin and Manolo have huge shadows they live in (a line which is actually uttered by Joaquin later): Joaquin’s dead father was a great war hero and Manolo’s father pushes him to be a bullfighter like all the men in their family have been. It makes for a unique conflict and a great message to kids of all ages: be yourself.

10) Maria as a character.

Originally posted by maria-magnolia2

You get a real sense of Maria as a character when we first meet her. Not only does she have the wonderful line, “I belong to no one!” but she also shows her placement of morality over societal values by freeing animals slated for slaughter. Her father sends her off to a convent to become, “a proper lady,” but…it doesn’t really work. At least, she doesn’t become his definition of proper. She is loving, kind, sweet, but fiercely independent and someone who follows her heart above all else. Zoe Saldana voices Maria, and breathes such wonderful life into the character you forget she’s acting. Everything about Maria just feel so real it’s amazing.

Originally posted by zoeesaldanaa

11) The decision to compose the film’s soundtrack from popular music recorded specifically for the movie (the mariachi version of “I Will Wait For You” being the earliest example) as well as original songs composed by Paul Williams is a great one. The copyrighted songs never feel out of place and don’t distract from the plot, instead playing perfectly into the emotion of the scene. And the original songs are made for the moments which are purely story and pure character, so they could not possibly be represented by something which was already written because this story hasn’t existed before.

12) Manolo!

Originally posted by annika-renina

All the characters in this film are written with such life and depth that lead character Manolo couldn’t POSSIBLY be an exception. He has skills as a bullfighter, but is deeply conflicted by his duty to his family and his duty to his heart. But it’s all guided by love, something with is illustrated by the inscription on his guitar (a gift from Maria, nonetheless): “Always play from the heart.” It is Manolo’s defining characteristic and defining struggle: that he wants to be himself, not his father or anyone else.

Diego Luna just…ugh! So I’ve seen Luna in small roles before (The Terminal, Elysium) but this film makes me a HUGE fan of his! I’m really looking forward to his role in Rogue One BECAUSE I loved his performance in this film so much. Manolo sings more than any other character in the film, and Luna infuses each song with such sincerity and warmth it is nearly impossible not to fall in love with his performance as Manolo. And he treats each line of dialogue the same. Like Saldana as Maria, you don’t feel like you’re listening to an actor. You’re listening to Manolo.

Originally posted by luna-diego

13) Grandma is hysterical.

Grandma Sanchez [after Manolo refuses to kill a bull]: “Kids today, with their long hair and no killing stuff.”

Grandma Sanchez [after Manolo’s father says everyone in their family was a great bullfighter]:

Originally posted by grumblepie

“A BEAST!”

She doesn’t have many lines but very nicely embodies the film’s wonderful characters and humor.

14) Manolo’s Father, Carlos.

I have seriously MIXED feelings about Carlos, and I think you’re supposed to. He shows a genuine desire to do the best for his son, he just doesn’t actually KNOW what’s best for his son. He pressures him into being a bull fighter because it’s the Sanchez way, and when Manolo expresses dissatisfaction with this his father shames him into doing it.

Carlos [to convince Manolo to be a bullfighter]: “Don’t you LOVE your family?”

(GIF source unknown [if this is your GIF please let me know].)

(PS, I find this line to be the sign of an abusive relationship but maybe that’s just me.)

BUT Carlos has genuine moments of love with his son. He encourages him to tell Maria how he feels, he comforts him when he’s missing his dead mother, he actually LOVES Manolo. Hector Elizondo’s performance and the writing gets this across in a great way, and I think the film is better for it.

15) Channing Tatum as Joaquin.

Originally posted by fwankcastles

I do have to say of the trio of friends, Channing Tatum’s Joaquin is probably the weakest link. BUT that’s like calling one of The Lord of the Rings movies the worst in the trilogy: it was still nominated for best picture! I think it’s definitely because you know Joaquin is the third wheel, you know that Maria loves Manolo, and so it’s hard to get behind it. And you just can see that although they’re great as friends they wouldn’t make a good couple (despite Joaquin’s hopes to the contrary).

It would’ve been easy to write Joaquin as a jerk. And although he can be a bit pig headed here and there, you understand that he’s a genuinely good friend who truly cares for Maria (even though they’re not a great fit). Tatum brings a lot of this to the role, and even though I believe he’s the only non-Hispanic actor playing a decidedly Hispanic character (Ron Perlman gets a pass because Xibalba is an otherworldly creature) he has the same warmth and sincerity as Luna and Saldana have. It’s a nice way to round out the trio of friends.

Originally posted by jumpstmovies

16) I can’t tell if this joke is stupid or hysterical.

Pepe [when he and his brothers are in danger]: “I’m allergic to dying!”

Pancho: “Especially in the face!”

Originally posted by idiot-eden

17) Joaquin’s biggest failing is probably that he buys too much into societal values, and his society’s values are…sexist. He is surprised that Maria reads, expects her to be a doting housewife (as all the high up men do), and that’s not what his heart wants it’s what he thinks should be.

18) “I Love You Too Much”.

Originally posted by odazais

This is the song Manolo sings to express his feelings for Maria, and it’s beautiful. Paul Williams has crafted a quiet, loving melody which pulls at your heartstrings and is sung beautifully by Diego Luna. I think it’s my favorite song in the film and one of the best love songs I’ve ever heard.

19) Maria is awesome, if that hasn’t been made clear already.

Maria [stopping a kiss after Manolo’s song]: “Did you think it was going to be that easy?”

She’s not the girl who falls head over heels for someone just because they sang to hear. It’s appreciated, but there needs to be more than that. I love it!

20) This film never subscribes to storied cliches. It’s not like Manolo can’t be an idiot too, as noted when he and Joaquin start to fight over Maria (which she has shown to never truly appreciate).

Originally posted by lolitajohnadams

Maria: “You two are acting like fools.”

Manolo: “Wait, me too?”

You mean me, the nice guy romantic lead, is actually making a mistake? What kind of movie is this? (Hint: a great one.)

21) How long must it have taken to put out all those candles?

Originally posted by mariaymanolo

It shows devotion on Manolo’s part. As will the rest of the film, honestly.

22) One of the conflicts in this movie that gets me going the most is how unfair everyone is to Manolo. When they were children he stopped a wild boar from hurting people, but Joaquin got credit because he saved the mayor. As adults he’s ready to fight off bandits without a magic medal, but Joaquin gets credit because he does fight them off WITH a magic medal which protects him from harm. And when Maria dies from a snake bite everyone blames him. He’s not the snake! He didn’t bite her! So bug off!

23) My brother and I laughed so hard after we heard this line:

Student [after Manolo dies]: “What is it with Mexicans and death!?”

The only reason that line isn’t racist is because it was written by a Mexican in a film directed by a Mexican which is produced by a Mexican. So it’s okay to laugh.

24) The Land of the Remembered!

Originally posted by lolitajohnadams

Originally posted by lolitajohnadams

The Land of the Remembered is when this film’s visual style really takes off. Gutierrez’s imagination and the animation department’s skill bleeds through every scene in this wonderful place and it really pulls you into it’s world magnificently.

25) I mentioned in my Nightmare Before Christmas recap that Burton and company did a good job of establishing minor character with small introductions, and The Book of Life (although not Burton) follows in that tradition when we meet Manolo’s family.

Each family member - from the brutish Carmelo (voiced by the film’s director) to grandpa Luis (voiced by Danny Trejo) - is given a unique character with just a few seconds of screen time and dialogue which carries through until the end of the film. It works wonderfully.

Originally posted by lamuertes

26) This freaking line, after Jorge is established as wanting to have been a singer.

Originally posted by dukespook

Manolo [after the two laugh about it]: “They crushed our dreams. Hilarious!”

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

27) Manolo’s Mother.

(GIF originally posted by @lamuertes)

Immediately there is a difference in what is expected from Carmen Sanchez (his mom) and what there is.

Manolo: “And I became a bullfighter, just like you wanted.”

Carmen: “Me? Are you crazy?”

It turns out Manolo’s father saying his mother wanted that was…uh…wrong, to put it mildly. It’s a nice juxtaposition which establishes her as a character and not just a plot device.

28) Dude, I love this dialogue.

Xibalba [after Luis says La Muerte would never hand over her kingdom]: “She lost a bet.”

Luis: “Oh. She would do that.”

29) You get a lot of Manolo’s tender side and playing from the heart, but it’s easy to forget that he’s still a headstrong Sanchez boy. He still has the fierceness of a bull fighter, even if that’s not what he wants to do. And we see this particularly when Manolo threatens to expose Xibalba. That may not be the smartest move, but it is fierce.

30) Did I mention this dialogue and humor is awesome?

Luis [after his body is knocked away from his head]: “Hey, my arthritis is gone!”

31) The Candlemaker

Originally posted by thenugu

The Candlemaker rounds out the trio of immortals here, and falls in the middle. He is not about the Land of the Remembered or the Land of the Forgotten, he creates the candles (each candle representing a life). He is this big ball of happy childlike energy which is just fun to watch. And who’d they get to place this super upbeat and positive guy with hope and optimism dripping from him?

Originally posted by hiphop-community

It’s a nice change of pace from Ice Cube’s more hardboiled characters to see him play such a wonder filled creature, and to do it so well too! His voice work stands up there with the rest of the cast in that you never think you’re listening to Ice Cube, you’re just watching the Candlemaker. It’s great.

32) ALL THE LADIES IN THIS FILM ARE FIERCE AS HELL!

  • Maria’s fierceness has been established above.
  • La Muerte getting pissed when she finds out Xibalba cheated on the beat is fierce!
  • MANOLO’S MOTHER SLAPS XIBALBA AFTER SHE REALIZES HE KILLED HER SON!!!

Originally posted by jeunetrentenaire

It’s a lot of fun to watch.

33) The final fight before Manolo can return to the land of the living is born from a wager he makes with Xibalba (he’ll face whatever challenge is thrown his way and win).

Xibalba: “What, do tell, is your worst fear?”

And then we get this:

Originally posted by littlechinesedoll

But it turns out his greatest fear isn’t killing the bull, it’s being true to himself. This ties into what I mentioned earlier: Manolo’s defining characteristic and his struggle are the same in that he wants to be himself. And we get a wonderful song to tie it up, of the same quality as “I Love You Too Much” and it is simply called “The Apology Song”. (Manolo’s father, who’s dead at this point, said that a Sanchez never apologies but after the fight is incredibly proud of his son.) It’s a nice character climax for Manolo before we get the final fight of the film.

34) When you have no idea this is coming, it’s the funniest line in the film.

Originally posted by museelo

(GIFs originally posted by @museelo)

35) I give massive credit to the filmmakers for the way they handled Joaquin. He and Maria are set to be married now that Manolo is dead, and he knows Maria doesn’t want it so he’s about to talk to her about it before the town is attacked by bandits. Joaquin could have easily been some Gaston type but instead we got a sincere, honest character who deepens the conflict of the film.

36) This freaking movie…

Originally posted by stevenscrivello

(GIF originally posted by @stevenscrivello)

37) The entire final fight of the film is wildly fun to watch.

Originally posted by kathon

It’s well paced, well choreographed, brings in all the characters we’ve met so far (living and dead), gives us a nice “dance” with Manolo and Maria, is filled with nice character moments, good humor, and has Joaquin decide he’s going to be his own man and try to sacrifice himself for his friends (it doesn’t work, he survives). It’s a great climax to the film.

38) “No Matter Where You Are”, the final song in the film, is a great ball of energy and love. But more than that, it let me know something I didn’t before…

Zoe Saldana can REALLY sing!

Originally posted by lghtmgnt

Just thought I’d share.

39) The final reveal, that Christina Applegate’s tour guide and the security guard are really La Muerte and Xibalba, is in classic tradition of magical realism and fairytale stories. It’s a nice ending to the film.

Originally posted by good-goodbye


The Book of Life is great, and truly under appreciated. It’s representation of Mexican culture is unique in the animated film landscape, and gives the film a unique visual and musical style. The acting is topnotch, and you can feel through the writing/directing/character animation that it is truly a labor of love for all those involved. A great film which everyone should see.

Up next: Alice in Wonderland (1951)

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Sherlock Holmes on Elementary is definitely a jerk. But he’s also a good person with a deep sense of empathy. Let’s explore how Elementary fits into the legacy of Holmes Adaptions, and how the character is depicted in these complex, contradictory ways.

Transcript below the cut

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Armed Detective Agency Off-Set

Atsushi- Atsushi’s personality takes almost a complete 180 off set. He’s quirky, fun and loud. He finds his outfit kind of annoying to deal with because the belt keeps smacking him in the ass and legs when he’s filming. He also thinks he looks kinda like a hobo, even if that is the point of his getup. The hardest part in filming was trying to keep a straight face as Akutagawa spit out the word ‘Jinko’ because of the strange accents he would do. Atsushi is crazy dedicated to filming and is always seen with his script in hand. But, just like the Show Atsushi, they’re both kind to everyone, although irl Atsushi likes to joke around a lot more. When they were filming the Chazuke part in the beginning, he couldn’t finish it all, so the crew teamed up to help him.

Dazai- Dazai is so extra that he refuses to take off his costume until the set is actually closing, and even then, it takes five people to shove him into a change room. He’s really cheeky and mischievous to people that he’s comfortable with, but the entire crew can tell you that he kept to himself for the first two weeks because he was really shy. He’s a crazy good singer, but the only person he sings seriously for is Chuuya. They aren’t officially dating, but everyone knows that he will eventually.He’s pretty good at keeping in his alcohol too. Also, Dazai is the king of pranks. He once switched out everyone’s scripts for the Bee Movie script (even Asagiri’s). Dazai also acted like Yenpress Dazai for a week, driving everyone insane. A not-so-funny prank ended up with him in the hospital after accidentally hanging himself as a joke. The wiring was faulty and he was choking for a good 20 seconds before Yosano panicked and said that it was indeed real. There’s at least one crew member watching Dazai’s actions from that scare.

Side note: The entire crew once played ‘Never Have I Ever’ without Dazai there for fun and accidentally found out that everyone has had a crush on Dazai at least once from the entire time they worked with him. They all vow to keep it a secret (although Chuuya is slightly jealous, he would never admit it) They can’t help it, he’s really charming. 

Fukuzawa- He’s the most like his character than anyone on the set (excluding several other members). But… he’s actually semi-allergic to cats, which kills him inside because he loves animals. He, Hirotsu and Mori are always seen together talking about politics and other things that most of them don’t care about. Fukuzawa is great friends with everyone and is in charge of making sure the studio doesn’t burn down from everyone’s shenanigans

Ranpo- He’s not as lazy as everyone thinks. The guy goes for an hour runs before filming begins because he knows the amount of food he’s going to consume is ridiculous. Ranpo sometimes kidnaps Carl to freak Poe out, which sometimes leads into really loud bickering. He can be found helping with the cameras/filming or reading a book in the corner while blasting rap music from his headphones. He’s also brilliant at chess and graduated early. Ranpo has never found a job he actually likes until he became and actor on BSD

Yosano- Still Queen off and on set. She and Kouyou are best friends, but everyone has been trying to get them together since the production began. Yosano and Ranpo had a slight fling back then, but are still pretty great friends. Because she plays someone with medical knowledge, she does actually have training so everyone goes to her when they have an injury. She also really adores kids and always gives candy to Kyouka, Yumeno and Kenji (and Oda’s kids, but they’re rarely around)

Kunikida- He’s actually pretty laid back off the set and is always willing to give advice. Dazai’s antics have worn onto him, and is sometimes seen helping him out with pranks and such. Kunikida thinks his character is ridiculously uptight, but the crew has already placed bets as to when he’ll discover that some of the behaviours are coming off the screen and into his own life. He’s known to tie with Dazai and Chuuya when having drinking competitions.

Haruno- She’s Naomi’s stylist and helps out in the set and crew when she’s not on-screen. She’s surprisingly handy with technology and constantly wonders how she puts up with all the weirdness on and off set. Haruno loves them all though

Tanizaki Siblings-  Tanizaki siblings love each other, but not that much. The whole incest thing wasn’t really their choice. Junichiiro believes his outfit is pretty similar to how he dresses, but Naomi finds it kind of gross and wants to change his style. She constantly goes to Kouyou to get fashion advice  and drags Haruno, who is her designated stylist to go with her. She finds wearing her school uniform slightly convenient because she has to rush there after filming anyways. Junichiiro is always roped into zooming through traffic on his motorcycle to get her there on time. They are also designated to get coffee each morning because everyone has given up on Dazai getting it for them.

Kenji- No matter what his role is in the show, he is most definitely not a farmer’s boy. If anything, he’s the most corrupt 14 year old any of them had met. His mind has surpassed the gutter and currently lives in the 9th circle of meme hell. Everyone wonders what happened to him. Regardless, he’s still pretty sweet and loves to cause chaos on the set. He’s also quite a charmer and has a small crush on Kyouka, leaving a small love triangle between them and Yumeno. The entire team is divided between the two boys and some of them *cough (Kunikida and Haruno) wonder why their lives aren’t as cute as theirs is. Kenji is also crazy smart and sassy af.

Kyouka- Everyone adores Kyouka so much. She’s the princess around the set and you can see Chuuya and Kouyou absolutely spoiling her. Her personality also takes a big turn. She’s not into cutesy things at all, at least that’s what she said when everyone gave her giant Dango pillows, but unbeknownst to them, she still has them in her room. Her pigtails feel childish to her and she finds it annoying every time Kenjii flicks them like reins. She’s extremely sassy and knowledgeable about the relationships between everyone on set. People constantly watch their back, but she’s like the black market dealer for secrets, no one knows how she does it. Kyouka comes from a rich family, but because of that, she’s homeschooled, so everyone tries to pitch in and make her life fun to make up for all that she’s missing. Also, Kyouka hates the phone around her neck in the show; more than once they’ve had to refilm a part because one of her 5 cellphones go off in the middle of a recording. Normally it’s one of her online friends or a recording studio asking her to come to a cover for them.

Why Newt Scamander is NOT a cinnamon roll and why he’s flawed:

First of all, I am NOT saying that I hate Newt at all – I LOVE Newt, I LOVE Eddie and I’ve loved watching Eddie act since I saw him in “The Theory of Everything”. I think Eddie is fantastic, and I do love Newt’s character.

HAVING SAID THAT, this rant is more to do with the fandom than anything else – as in, me being pissed off with the fandom because of their “Newt is a precious cinnamon roll/Newt is too good for this world/Newt is perfect/Newt needs protecting” mentality. This isn’t all of the fandom, of course, but it’s a fair few and I’ve found myself getting gradually more and more infuriated over the past few months about it. This shouldn’t be regarded as hate, more as a retort/insight as to why I disagree with this silly mentality.

Let me start off by saying: Newt Scamander is VERY flawed. There, I said it.

Newt is NOT perfect. He’s awkward, has little to no regard for other humans, and is pretty untrustworthy to be honest. How? I present to you, an extract from the screenplay:

TINA
So, you got your wand permit? All foreigners have to have them in New York.

NEWT
(lying)
I made a postal application weeks ago

Small but think: if he’s lying about a postal application, chances are he’s lying about a lot more important stuff too. Either way, she was going to write him up. He had very little to gain from lying. I would also like to add that he’s breaking yet another law (even if it’s silly, it’s still breaking a law).

The thing that we, the audience, have to understand about Newt is that we like him because we know he’s a protagonist – we know he’s Eddie, we know the kind of person he is even before we watch the film. But if you look at it from an inside perspective – i.e. someone who lives in the universe of the film – he’s shady as fuck. He not only didn’t bother with a wand permit application, he also smuggled beasts into the country illegally (he had full knowledge of what he was doing, don’t deny it), apparated with a No-Maj, then didn’t obliviate that No-Maj, accidentally set a Niffler loose in a bank and basically decided “hey, fuck the law, I’d rather expose wizards than lose my Niffler/miss the egg hatching” when he apparated with Jacob. Standing on the steps of the bank, talking to an abusive woman/leader of the NSPS, he probably looked even more suspicious (especially seeing as she openly called him “friend” – which, to be honest, doesn’t really mean a lot but just imagine you’re there and that happens…you’d probably be a bit iffy about it).

How else is Newt untrustworthy in the first half of the film? He lies to Tina about why he’s in New York in the first place and he then blackmails Jacob into sneaking away from the girls’ apartment even though they gave them food and hot cocoa. You know when Newt says “you do realize that once they see you’ve stopped sweating, they’ll obliviate you in a heartbeat”? It’s sly blackmail. He knows that Jacob doesn’t want his memory wiped, he knows that Jacob is enjoying this new world that he’s been exposed to, and Newt is using that to his advantage. The choice in front of Jacob he’s setting out is: “Help me find my creatures and remain in this wonderful world…or, you know, stay here and have your memory wiped”.

I’m not denying the friendship between Newt and Jacob – their friendship is wonderful. But at this point, they aren’t exactly friends really, even if they’re starting to head that way. Newt was perfectly happy to attempt to sneak out of the apartment on his own before Queenie called him out – part of the reason he’s probably bringing Jacob is because he knows that Jacob will say something otherwise. I mean, Jacob is a good guy – he didn’t want to leave because he knew it would be rude to just leave the girls after all they had done for them. I’m not saying that Newt isn’t a good guy, I’m just…well.

Newt also has a total disregard for other humans/safety; “yep, let me throw a Swooping Evil in a No-Maj’s face for a joke”. Total dick move, even if he thought he knew what he was doing. “No-Maj is lying on the floor bleeding – nah, he’s fine, where’s the creatures?”. “Let me bring a No-Maj on a hunt to find potentially dangerous creatures”.

Actual thing in the screenplay when Jacob has been bitten by a Murtlap:

“With TINA’S back turned, NEWT makes towards the door”

What makes Newt turn back?

“TINA emits a guttural scream as the Murtlap comes scuttling out (…) NEWT spins, catching the creature by the tail”.

Newt wasn’t concerned at all for Jacob – “oh, it’s not serious”. Yeah, maybe not to a wizard but to a No-Maj whose physiology is different? Potentially extremely dangerous.

But, yeah, no - Newt is absolutely perfect of course so we’ll forget about it. (sarcasm)

He isn’t just awkward either, okay? He had no problem dragging Jacob down into the case, nor when it came to pushing Tina’s hair back at the docks. Every time I see a fic where he stutters out “I-I-I-I l-lo-love you”, I puke in my mouth a bit. That is so OOC and silly. When it’s humans he knows and likes (loves, in Tina’s case, fight me), he’s more confident and assured – so please stop saying that he’s awkward and will forever be so awkward that he cannot have human friends/love interests.

Newt has great qualities, of course, I’m not denying that…but please stop writing him/saying he’s perfect…or that he’s “too good for this world”/”too pure”/”too innocent”. He’s really not. He’s flawed, as all the best characters should be, and if you love his character then you should also be able to say “he’s got flaws and that’s okay”.

With this image of him being “perfect”, there comes my next pet-peeve: Tina hate.

I have legit seen people say that Newt is “too good/perfect” for Tina. I can’t even begin to sum up the stupidity of that idea; shipping aside, they’re both flawed characters in their own ways and that’s totally fine. I feel that some of the Tina-hate stems from either jealousy or the idea that Newt is too perfect; it’s like “oh, my OC is perfect because she’s just like Newt”. Please, no. Don’t.

Tina-hate also seems to stem from the fact that she “turned Newt in”. The usual rant goes here: a) it was her job, b) he’s pretty shady, c) you’d all complain if she put a guy she barely knew over getting her career back on track….etc. etc. Suddenly, because Tina DID HER JOB and it happened to involve arresting Newt, that makes her the fandom’s number one enemy.

Tina isn’t the only one I’ve seen receive hate: I legit saw someone say that they hated Queenie for “forcing Newt to get with Tina” and I just…? Since fucking when? How does “you need a giver” translate as “you have no choice but to marry my sister and live in Dorset with her”?

As I said, this fandom is so obsessed with the idea of “precious cinnamon roll Newt is too good too pure he needs protection”. He’s NOT this. Please stop making him like this. He’s a flawed man, he makes mistakes, as do we all, he’s far from perfect.

As I said before, I love Newt, he’s a great character, but the way that the fandom categorizes him as “a perfect sexy wonderful cinnamon roll who is too good for this world” is actually vomit-inducing and makes me start wanting to hate him – it genuinely puts me off being in the fandom when they push the idea that a character is too flawless, and Newt isn’t flawless which is why he’s a great character.

This rant made little to no sense really and I’m now off to write fanfics.

Tom Holland Imagine

hi! :3 could you maybe write an imagine with tom holland where he meets the reader, who’s robert downey jr’s daughter (and plays tony’s daughter) on the set of civil war and he’s all cute and awkward around her cuz he can’t work up the courage to ask her out, but she finds it adorable and ends up asking him out instead?

hello! could you maybe do a tom holland imagine where the reader is rdj’s daughter (and plays tony’s in the movies) and his girlfriend, and they’re at the civil war premiere together just being huge nerds and goofing around?



You walked onto the set in the morning and smiled at all your castmates, “Hey guys, I brought coffee for everyone,” you walked around and passed out the coffee orders you had memorized long ago after months of working with everyone. You walked over to Tom, who was on the Civil War set for the first time, and handed him a coffee. “Hi, I’m Y/N,” you introduced yourself. “I asked around yesterday to see what you liked. Caramel Frappuccino right?”

“Ugh, yeah,” he stuttered. “Thank’s so much. I’m Tom,” he awkwardly held out a hand before putting it back down. “But I guess you already knew that.”
“I did,” you laughed and felt bad when you saw his cheeks redden a little. “It’s nice to meet you. I have to go get ready for my scenes today but I’ll see you around.”

“Y/N,” you turned as you were leaving to your Dad, Robert Downey Jr., calling out to you. “Did you remember the extra sugar for my coffee?”

“Already put it in there Dad.”

After your first meeting Tom was always trying to come up with a way to casually start talking to you so he could ask you out. It didn’t help that your Dad was always near by which added to his intimidation.

The big fight seen with all the Avengers was taken place and you watched from your chair as your cast mates got into character and filmed their parts. After shooting one of his moves for a scene Tom was left hanging in the air by the wire and you hollered at him, “Look’s like you’re having fun up there.”

“Uh…yeah…” he sputtered out and went back to filming the next part of his fighting scenes when the director hollered.

He was cut done from his wires and was walking off towards his trailer when he saw you still sitting in your chair. “Good job out there,” you told him.

“Were you watching the whole time,” he said wringing his hands together.

“For most of it. I had to step away for wardrobe for a second but…,” you shrugged.

“I like the outfit,” he spoke up quickly and nervously.

“This is what I had on before,” you laughed. “I had to pick something out for later today but I didn’t put any new clothes on.”

“Right,” he awkwardly nodded and went to take a step back but ran into the table behind him. He tried to recover cooley and ended up in an awkward stretched out position against the table edge.

******

“You’re staring at her again kid.” Tom blinked his focus away from you and looked over at Anthony Mackie. “And don’t say you don’t know what I’m talking about,” he chuckled.

“Is it that obvious?”

“Oh yeah. Why don’t you just ask her out?”

“I’ve tried to but I get to nervous. I mean look at her. She’s Y/N Downey. And her Dad’s right there. I don’t want to get rejected and have her dad after me.”

“He wouldn’t do that, he’s a chill guy. And I think you should go after her. She’s a sweet girl, she’d a least give you a pity date,” he joked.

So Tom walked over to you confidently, ready to conquer his fears and ask you out, but as you walked with that smile towards him in your character’s lab coat and glasses he felt his hands get clammy. “Hey Tom. How was the scene?”

“Great. Good. Awesome,” he rumbled on. “I had…um…a question for you,” he cursed himself for going back to his nervous self. He watched you as you smiled and waited for his question and changed his mind. He couldn’t do it. “Um, you know what I forgot what it was. Nevermind.”

“Wait,” you stopped him from leaving. “Would you want to go out for dinner this weekend?”

“Sure, who all is going?”

“No, I mean would you want to go on a date with me?” He was shocked.

“Ye-yeah! I mean yeah,” he said like excited to sound more cool.

******

Everyone watched as you and Tom hit the red carpet premiere for Civil War in your matching outfits. “So Y/N, tell us about your dress,” the interviewer asked as you and Tom stopped before going inside.

“It’s Elie Saab and it’s red to show my support for our favorite Spider in the movie,” you joked.

“It’s not red for your Dad’s character, Iron Man?”

“As much as my Dad wanted me to match with him I vetoed it,” you joked.

“From the second you and Tom stepped onto the carpet social media has been blowing up with all the pictures of you two goofing around and having fun. It looks like you two are entertaining yourselves out there.”

“Can I see some of these pictures,” Tom asked and someone handed him a phone full of Instagram pictures he and you had been tagged in. There were ones of you two making funny face at each other, Tom making the spider man web hand gesture at you like he was wrapping you in webbing, and you two striking overly dramatic poses together.

“Oh my God those are great and awful at the same time,” you gasped.

He smiled handing the phone back, “I’m printing and framing those.”

Epic Movie (Re)Watch #127 - Chicago

Originally posted by the-color-of-rain

Spoilers below.

Have I seen it before: Yes

Did I like it then: Yes.

Do I remember it: Yes.

Did I see it in theaters: No.

Format: Blu-ray

1) This film holds a lot of personal significance to me. I first saw it when I was 13 in one of the hardest months of my life. I was sick with pneumonia (diagnosed that day) and my great grandmother had just died, so the whole family was over because the funeral was that week. It was late and someone wanted to put in a movie so my dad pulls out Chicago. My mother was a little bit strangely strict about what PG-13 movies I could and could not see, usually forbidding more sexual stuff than anything else. So this was the most sexual film I had seen at the time and I had felt because of that, and the fact I was watching it with all the adults of my family, that I had been promoted to the adult table in some senses. I was really captivated by the music, the story, the moral ambiguity, it was just so different from anything else I’ve seen. I would not be Just Another Cinemaniac without Chicago. In some ways its as important to my film fan identity as Back to the Future.

2) The film opens with an extreme close up on Roxie’s (Renée Zellweger’s) eye, giving us our first inkling on how this is a musical in Roxie’s mind. But more on that later.

3) Note that we never see Velma Kelly’s (Catherine Zeta Jones’) face until she’s on stage giving a performance. This creates the feeling that Velma is ALWAYS putting on a performance.

4) Catherine Zeta Jones as Velma Kelly.

Originally posted by musemm

This film is pretty much perfectly cast, I think. 4 of its actors were nominated for Oscars, with another being nominated for a Golden Globe. Zeta Jones actually won her first (and to date only) Oscar for her role in this film, and for good reason to. She IS Velma Kelly. Zeta Jones is totally lost in the role, being able present all of Velma’s different qualities. Her showmanship, her rare vulnerability, her killer instinct, and it all just WORKS. You never EVER feel like you’re watching an actress. Zeta Jones IS Velma Kelly and as the first character we get a nice long look at, it is a great performance to start the film off with.

5) Hey, it’s Dominic West!

6) Renée Zellweger as Roxie Hart.

Originally posted by segel-sudeikis

Roxie is really the lead of this film, the character who we follow along and see the world through. The writing is really interesting. It would have been easy to start Roxie off as some innocent girl who made a mistake and goes on this big journey, but Roxie - despite whatever facade she puts up - is hardly some innocent girl. She readily and passionately has an affair even though her husband is a pretty nice guy (and not a “nice guy” where the guy acts nice but is really a jerk, but is actually pretty kind), murderers her lover just for being a jerk (there are better reasons to murderer someone), all while putting up this act like she did nothing wrong and is the victim. And I honestly think she believes it.

Renée Zellweger captures all these conflicting parts of Roxie’s character with true mastery. She also is able to handle Roxie’s transformation into a more cutthroat and determined creature with the same expertise. Like with Zeta Jones, you never feel like you’re watching Zellweger just giving a performance. She is - for all intents and purposes - Roxie. Originally Charlize Theron was cast in the part but after a change in directors there was a change in casting, and Zellweger had to learn signing and dancing for the film. It paid off wonderfully, as she was nominated for an Oscar for what is possibly her best role ever.

7) John C. Reilly as Amos.

Originally posted by mikewazowskis

John C. Reilly was also nominated for an Oscar for his performance in this film, and it is clear why. Amos is the only honestly good character in the film, and even then he is not without his flaws. He is not above losing his temper or being able to say when enough is enough when it comes to Roxie (you know, the woman who cheats on him, tries to have him take the fall for murder, and manipulates him in court just to get off). But - because this is Chicago - he’s the only main(ish) character to come out the other side being totally and utterly screwed over. There are some nice layers to Amos (mainly the loss of temper as mentioned above) and Reilly is just totally sincere in the part. It’s no wonder he was nominated for an Oscar.

8) This film sets itself apart from other movie musicals through the idea that the musical is all in Roxie’s head.

Originally posted by inlovewithaudreyhepburn

This creates a plausible explanation for why character’s burst into song and dance, allows the film to utilize some unique editing and art direction, and finally gives us a nice peek into Roxie’s head. This element allows us to see just how passionate Roxie is not only for the desire to perform but also the desire for fame. It also lets us know how she sees OTHER characters in the film (namely Billy Flynn, but more on that later). I think it is this key element that set the film up for such critical and artistic success, leading to its best picture win at the Oscars.

9) Danny Elfman provides a few nice instrumental pieces of score for the film which feel totally period Chicago. When you are adapting a popular musical such as Chicago adding extra music could be a challenge, but Elfman’s occasional score blends perfectly with the rest of the film.

10) Queen Latifah as Mama.

Originally posted by isabellenightwoods

Latifah rounds out the quartet of Academy Award nominated performances with her portrayal as Matron Mama Morton. I think it’s Latifah’s best performance. She is able to portray Mama as cooperative and a bit soft spoken, but still someone who deals with no bullshit from her inmates. She is as manipulative as any other character in this film, if not as in big a way. You often hear her tell Roxie and Velma EXACTLY what they want to hear knowing that it will lead to a big pay day for her. It is a crafty role which Latifah plays well, and her introductory song “When You’re Good to Mama” shows off not only this characterization but Roxie’s perception of her quite well. It also allows for Latifah to show off her impressive singing chops.

11) The Cell Block Tango.

Originally posted by queen-cii

Where do I even begin with this number? It is by far the most iconic and best part of the entire film. The filmmakers are able to use the idea of “the musical in Roxie’s mind” to create a visually unique and compelling number which is edited together seamlessly with the “real world” of the Cook County jail Roxie finds herself in. Each of the “murderess mistresses” is given enough time to create a unique character and create a sense of the world Roxie (and the audience) finds herself in at this time. I particularly find the use of ribbons to illustrate blood/murder wildly effective, noting that Hunyak’s ribbon (the girl who constantly claims she is not guilty) is white whereas the others are red. This suggest that she is - in fact - innocent.

It is also worth noting that while the first story starts off very much “I’m guilty, here’s what happened”, that by the time we get to the inmate who claims her husband “ran into her knife” ten times the stories have become more and more claiming of legal innocence. This is a trend which continues through Velma’s story, where she claims she blacked out after seeing her husband & sister having sex and came to with blood on her hands. We as the audience have actually seen NOTHING which contradicts this story, further creating a nice sense of showmanship within the film.

Originally posted by mymovieblogx

12) Okay, I am all for good female friendships on film and television, but I would be lying if I said the catty relationship between Velma & Roxie was not entertaining. I think this is a byproduct from good writing (with what we know about these characters, how ELSE could their relationship go?) and the wildly captivating chemistry between Zeta Jones and Zellweger. Their relationship is one of the key sources of conflict throughout the film and with those two actresses it just WORKS.

13) Richard Gere as Billy Flynn.

The number in Roxie’s head which introduces us to Flynn - “All I Care About” - is a pitch perfect example of expectations vs. reality. After what she’s heard about Billy (which isn’t much mind you), Roxie expects him to be this honest to goodness lawyer who only wants to save women from dying in by the noose in Chicago. What we get however is the craftiest, most manipulative skeeze ball in the film. So why is he so damn likable? Who is he comparable to the roguish Han Solo? Why do we root for him? I think that is all in Gere’s performance. It would be easily to play him as a disgusting slime ball but there is a charisma that Gere brings which I think elevates the character and the film. Originally offered to Hugh Jackman & John Travolta at different parts, Gere’s chemistry with the rest of the cast is great and although the film didn’t land him an Oscar nomination he did receive a Golden Globe for his work.

14) I think it’s worth noting that Roxie does not take too long to adapt to prison. Again evidence that she’s not as innocent as she wants people to think.

15) “We Both Reached For The Gun”

Originally posted by darker-than-light

I can never tell if this or “Razzle Dazzle” is my favorite number in the film, but I think for a visual standpoint it HAS to be this. This is once again where the conceit of “the musical in Roxie’s head” benefits the film GREATLY. The imagery of Roxie being a dummy operated by Billy to sell her story not reflects on their relationship in an incredibly clear way (as well as how Billy is literally using people) but also is just visually fascinating. Zellweger is a lot of fun during the number, and if you ever want to know why this film won the Oscar for best editing the year it was nominated just watch this scene.

16) The song “Roxie” when Roxie is at the top of her game is a great character study. It goes even deeper into Roxie’s desire for fame and admiration, a key quality in her character that drives pretty much all her actions throughout the film. It features gorgeous cinematography with its use of mirrors and presents us with Roxie’s ideal self. This ideal self is not a good person (not necessarily), but someone who is adored by her audience. If that doesn’t speak to who Roxie is as a character I don’t know what does.

Originally posted by barbara-stanwyck

17) A film is told in cuts, as in cutting from one moment to the next in as clean and clear a way as possible.

Velma [after Mama suggests she kisses Roxie’s ass to maintain some position]: “Over my dead body.”

[We cut to the mess hall, where Velma is seen smiling at Roxie]

Velma: “Mind if I join you?”

18) “I Can’t Do It Alone”

Originally posted by avengerassemble

Up until this point we have not seen Velma truly vulnerable. We have peeked more into who Roxie is as a character than who Velma is. That all changes with this number, which shows us that Velma is just as desperate for the spotlight as Roxie is. She NEEDS to stay relevant, she NEEDS the fame and the admiration, and only when it was too late did she realize that the murder of her sister took away one of the key things that made her so desirable to the world in the first place. This song is a fun number that adds nice depth to Zeta Jones’ character and shows off just how talented she can be with Velma’s vulnerability.

19) My heart broke a little when I saw Velma’s face after Roxie’s rejection of her.

And in that moment and that moment alone, I think I shipped the two of them together.

20) Lucy Liu’s glorified cameo as Kitty, the newest jazz killer in Chicago and the one who threatens to take away Roxie’s fame, is a perfect example of how easily Roxie can fall. But here’s the thing, Roxie is smarter than she appears. And more manipulative. It is her greatest strength that people underestimate her, so when she “faints” and mentions “the baby” everyone - from Velma to Billy - are all surprised by her.

21) I was a naive 13 year old. I didn’t understand that the doctor who said he’d testify that Roxie was pregnant had very clearly slept with her (hence Billy’s remark about his fly being open).

Originally posted by mulder-scully-gifs

22) “Mister Cellophane”

Originally posted by 80plays

Somehow this song not only shows us how ROXIE perceives her estranged husband as being someone who’s not worth caring about, but also makes Amos into a sympathetic character. He is not particularly whiny about the fact that he’s oft forgotten, he’s just a little sad about it. Reilly’s performance in the song is filled with soft sorrow and vulnerability we don’t always get to see from the actor, an honesty which carries the entire song on its back. It is a truly worthy number to be included with the rest of the film, with its Chaplin like art style and Reilly’s vocals, and I’m glad it made the cut.

23) In a lot of ways Chicago is a noir comedy musical. I say this for two reasons: Amos being kinda screwed over at the end, and the fact that Hunyak - the only innocent girl in the jail - is the only who is hanged. This also reminds Roxie of the fact that she IS on trial for murder and of the fatal consequences she could face.

24) “Razzle Dazzle”

Originally posted by barbara-stanwyck

If “We Both Reached for the Gun” is my favorite number in the film from a stylistic standpoint, then “Razzle Dazzle” is probably my favorite from a thematic one. Gere expresses Flynn’s belief that the courts are just a circus, simply entertainment to be manipulated, in a way which is just that: entertaining. I am always totally taken in by the song through its themes of craftiness, playful melody, and fun visuals. It is just a wonderful number which I love watching again and again.

25) If “Razzle Dazzle” doesn’t tell you how Billy sees the court system than this line will:

Originally posted by stilinska-archive

Hell, the non-musical court room scenes are in a lot of ways more dramatic than the musical ones.

26) This film had a song which was shot but not included in the final cut, one sung between Mama and Velma called “Class”. Still found on the movie’s soundtrack, “Class” had the pair discuss how the world seems to have gone to shit and how no one has any class. It was cut both for pacing issues and - largely - because it did not fit the theme of “the musical in Roxie’s head”. Roxie was at the court house and these two started singing after hearing about what was going on over the radio. It is a wonderful song but I think the film works better without it featured.

27) It took absolutely no time at all for Roxie not to matter. The press didn’t even want her picture after the verdict was read. Another killer, another star.

28) The final number of the film is a dual thing. The first of which is Roxie singing the song “Nowadays” on her own at an audition. The song is sad, somber, and lacks umph. This causes the directors to pass on Roxie. But when Velma and Kelly work together? When they’re able to work with their heat and chemistry and put on a duet of “Nowadays”? The umph is back and it is a wonderful number to end the film on!

Originally posted by damnafricawhathappened


I’m obviously biased through my own personal experience with the film, but I think Chicago is quite possibly the best movie musical of the 21st century (yes, even better than Les Miserables). The acting is incredible across the board, with Catherine Zeta Jones and Renée Zellweger being the obvious standouts. The concept of “the musical in Roxie’s head” allows for a musical which is unique and supports a wonderful art style. The songs are fun, the pacing and editing are great, and it’s a technical spectacle in its subtletly. Just a wonderfully entertaining film I think everyone should watch.

FOUR  STAGES  &  FOUR  CASES

________________________________________________________________

SOME STRANGE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN TFP, TLD, TST, TAB & THE GREAT GAME

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It happened quite accidentially that I discovered the following similarities. A little scene almost at the end of ‘The Final Problem’ started the ball rolling. Sherlock pushes open his prison room and suddenly stands in front of Musgrave Hall - the old home of the Holmes family.

Keep reading

4

New Alex Interview with the Los Angeles Times!

Q&A What can bring TV frenemies together? In ‘Big Little Lies,’ all it took was Alexander Skarsgård’s villain

By Yvonne Villarreal

The befuddled tweets came chirping in: “Alexander Skarsgård in ‘Big Little Lies’ is simultaneously gorgeous and completely repulsive” and “I have very complicated feelings about Alexander Skarsgård now, thanks ‘Big Little Lies.’”

In the days and weeks after the premiere of HBO’s limited series about a group of women living in a wealthy Northern California community, Skarsgård’s role as Perry, the abusive husband to Nicole Kidman’s character, had viewers curbing their swoons. It was a reality Skarsgård expected but didn’t fully contend with until about three months after the series premiered in February.

“I wasn’t in the country when it aired,” the 40-year-old actor said during a recent visit to The Times’ video studio. “I was very much in a bubble, working…. It wasn’t until I got back to the States about a week ago, and I landed and everyone at the airport was like, ‘Ooh, yeah, no, we don’t like you.… People look at me differently now.

“And I’ll probably never get another job,” he jokingly continued, “but that’s OK, we had a good time on it.”

How did you initially see Perry, and how did that evolve as you were making the episodes?

Alex:  I thought it was just a fascinating piece. And that dynamic, between Celeste [Kidman] and Perry, was very disturbing, and very rich and interesting. And I felt like there’s a way of playing an abusive husband … to try to avoid the stereotypical abusive husband, and to kind of find someone who’s conflicted and tormented, and who’s really struggling with this. As opposed to just playing a two-dimensional bad guy.

How did you approach the role — getting to a comfortable space with Nicole and the children?

Alex:  We spent time together, and also with the boys, our kids, just play dates. We would just hang out and get to know each other better and have fun. It was very important that the boys were comfortable and relaxed around us. I wanted Perry to have a great relationship with his kids. I wanted him to be a good dad. Again, just to make it a bit more interesting, and more difficult for Celeste, in a way — where she’s like, we have this strong connection, we love each other, he’s an amazing dad. But then there’s this darkness, and you know, it’s almost like a switch when he goes black.

How was it to do that first scene where we see this dark side?

Alex: He’s in control, and when he’s not, it’s kind of … he snaps. And it’s just that one split-second of grabbing her too hard, holding on to her. And it was important to get that, to feel that shift, and that it was shocking to the audience. It was important that it be kind of an explosion, even though he doesn’t hit her there. But it’s definitely way too physical, and too aggressive.

Would you say shooting these types of scenes is more intimate than doing a sex scene — in terms of vulnerability?

Alex:  It’s an interesting way of working. Because stuff goes wrong. And that’s kind of interesting, because you discover things that you might not have, had it been too planned or too structured. We didn’t rehearse much. We just kind of got there and we jumped in. And it’s an interesting feeling, because after the first take you’re always like, ‘Oh, that was interesting. I didn’t expect that, or the scene to go in that direction.’ It didn’t necessarily work every time. Sometimes we felt like something happened, and we went somewhere, and then we were like, all right, well, maybe we should try it again and go in a different direction.

What was it like to be part of a project where women’s stories were at the forefront, and you’re the villain in this whole thing?

Alex:  It was very refreshing to read it because it’s so well-written and it’s so female-driven, obviously. It’s about these very strong, very independent, very — some of them are crazy, but, like, it’s a great group — all those roles are so rich and so interesting, and it’s real. There’s definitely not enough material like that here in Hollywood.

Can we talk about the final episode with the school party — isn’t it supposed to be a trivia night? Where’s the trivia?

Alex:  I think that was the plan, but then someone got murdered, so that kind of killed the vibe.

What was it like to film that moment where all the women come together to take you down?

Alex:  It was brilliant and it was like animals, when one predator is being attacked by a smaller predator, but they gang up on him from everywhere. You see those nature documentaries where they’re everywhere, and one on one he can take them, but it’s just overwhelming. We wanted to be so primal and violent, and to kind of re-create that. [Perry’s] attacking someone, but then there’s someone on his back. Reese was literally hanging on my back, you know, like, pulling my hair, and someone else was punching my ribs. It was intense.

Sources:  Article:  LATimes.com (x), Photos:  Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

2

New interviews:  Alex opens up about Big Little Lies with The Hollywood Reporter and Entertainment Weekly!

WARNING: These interviews contains spoilers from the Big Little Lies season finale. Read at your own risk!

From The Hollywood Reporter:

The actor talks to THR about working with Nicole Kidman and that “brilliant” finale death.

“It’s obviously a huge problem in our society,” Skarsgard tells The Hollywood Reporter about the domestic violence storyline.

Skarsgard spoke further with THR about the importance of exploring Perry and Celeste’s relationship, the violent and “emotionally draining scenes” they shared and his character’s “brilliant” demise.

The Hollywood Reporter:  The show explores the real-life issue and severity of domestic abuse, violence and rape. Your character, Perry, is the abuser in these cases. Going into the role, what was your thought process on how to tackle these stories and portray this character?

Alex:  I thought it was such a rich script and the tone felt very unique. It felt like such an emotional roller coaster that I thought was brilliantly written. In terms of the character, I saw it as an opportunity to play an abusive husband who wasn’t this stereotypical abusive husband. It was such a well-fleshed out relationship and the dynamic between Perry and Celeste was fascinating to me. I saw it as an opportunity to find a character where you see him struggle with his demons as opposed to being the traditional wife-beater.

THR:  What makes him not the stereotypical abusive husband?

Alex:  She fell in love with this innocent kid that he’s got within him. In a way, he is like his sons. He’s a very social, outgoing guy and loves to have fun. In those moments, those demons are hidden far within him and then they come out. You do see that he’s struggling with it. He can’t control it. They just take over and consume him. What I thought was interesting about their relationship is it ties in with their sexuality as well and that makes it more difficult to leave him. She blames herself and says, “I’m an accomplice. I’m part of this.” When we have sex, it is very violent and I love that, but then she [thinks] “Maybe I push him too far.” Which she doesn’t, but she blames herself for it and feels that, deep down, he’s a good guy and a great dad and loves her and [she] can fix him and that he just has to deal with those demons. But he can’t. That’s what’s killing him inside. He can’t control it.

THR:  The abuse scenes are very violent. How difficult were those for you to shoot?

Alex:  They were really tough to shoot. Jean-Marc works in a way where it’s more like shooting a play than shooting a movie. It’s not traditional filmmaking in the sense where you have the master and two-shot and then you move in for coverage. There are no tape marks on the floor. It’s all existing lights and a handheld camera that roams around which is a great opportunity as an actor to explore this space and play around and find new things. One take can be very different from the previous. That really helped those scenes.

Nicole and I got to know each other really well before we started the project and spent time together and worked on our relationship. We just got to know each other. We both felt it was very important that when we step into that room and shoot those scenes, you have to get to a place of 100 percent trust. The scenes were emotionally and physically so draining. They’re incredibly hard to shoot. It was more about getting to know each other  and spending time together and working on that trust. And talking about their relationship and figuring out the nice part about these characters and how they connect and why they fell in love, what’s holding them together. We wanted to find that. We played the whole scene from beginning to end. We weren’t restricted by any tape marks on the floor or any technical issues. It was very primal in a way and some of the toughest scenes I’ve ever had to shoot. It was completely emotionally draining.

THR:  Nicole has spoken about how physically and emotionally draining they were for her. Have you spoken with her about that?

Alex:  It was important every day after shooting a scene like that to check in with each other and make sure that we would reconnect and talk about how we felt about it and what we went through. We both knew that jumping in your car and going home after a scene like that is very tough. You need to share that connection with the person you just went through that with. I had the best partner in the world with Nicole in doing that. She’s not only an extraordinary actress, but such a warm and generous person. That made it be even more difficult. 

THR:  How important is it to tell this story of domestic abuse on television?

Alex:  It’s very important. It’s obviously a huge problem in our society. It’s stigmatized. [Wives] are protective of their husbands and in certain cases they blame themselves and say, “It takes two to tango. I’m partly responsible for this.” They don’t really see themselves as victims sometimes. It’s not until you talk to someone outside that you can get an outside perspective and you realize then, “This is an abusive relationship that I shouldn’t be in.” It’s important to reach out and to have someone help you and talk to someone who can get you out of it. It’s not your responsibility to change another person.

THR:  Perry is obviously dead. What’s your take on the ending for your character?

Alex:  I love that they all gang up on him and kill him, in a way, together. It gets very primal and they’re all over him and kill him together in order to protect Celeste. It felt like something out of a nature documentary where you see a predator being attacked by smaller predators and by the sheer force of numbers they take him down. That’s what I had in my head where I was physically stronger than them as individuals, but together they brought me down. (Laughs.) I thought it was brilliant. 

THR:  What was filming that scene like?

Alex:  It was tough. It’s a very physical moment. But it was exciting and fun because we were all together. Up until that point, it had been a lot of separate stories. Those ladies are amazing women and so much fun to be around. So it was a fun two weeks of night shoots with all of them. We were all excited about the ending and how it all comes together. 
Big Little Lies finale: Alexander Skarsgård on why he may never get another job

THR:  What were the conversations with Jean-Marc like about who Perry is and how he reaches his fate in the end?

Alex:  I liked that the introduction to the family was dream like. It’s exactly what you want. They have beautiful kids, an amazing house, a great job, everything is perfect and then you crack the surface and see there’s a lot of darkness there. We were both excited about an opportunity to play this character who can be charming and a great dad, but there’s a switch and the lights go out and he’s not himself. With the camera watching the women in the very last scene, it leaves the ending open-ended. It’s Perry in his Elvis outfit, but with a broken neck up on the beach watching them. (Laughs.) It’s payback time. He’s back from the dead and it’s time for revenge. Season two will just be him killing them all off. (Laughs.)

THR:  Could there be more episodes? 

Alex:  It was set up as a miniseries. That was always the intention to leave it with them on the beach and living with this secret and accepting that and moving on with their lives. It leaves it open-ended in a way, but there’s no cliffhanger for another season or anything. 

Article source:  Brian Porreca for TheHollywoodReporter.com (x) via THR twitter (x)

From Entertainment Weekly:

As you probably know by now, Alexander Skarsgård’s Perry Wright died at the end of the seventh episode of Big Little Lies. Some might call it murder, some might prefer the ladies’ explanation that he fell to his death. Either way, Skarsgard made for an excellent villain. Regardless of the hate he inspired because of how he treated his wife, he also wanted to change and really did love Celeste. Those were some dark demons residing inside of him, demons he was unable to exorcise, regardless of how he tried.

We talked to Skarsgard about his character, the challenges of playing him, and why he’s pretty sure he’s not going to be working again in Hollywood anytime soon.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Your storyline with Nicole Kidman was one of the most compelling in the show. What was your first reaction when you read the scripts?

ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD: I was very excited. I thought the tone was so unique. It’s funny and twisted and camp and then really dark and twisted. The pendulum would swing back and forth between different tones. I was very intrigued by the relationship between Celeste and Perry. I thought it was an opportunity to tell a story about an abusive husband that wasn’t a stereotypical wife-beater. I thought it was fascinating that he was a good dad, loves his kids, and adores his wife. On the surface, they have a perfect life and then he’s struggling with these demons and he doesn’t know how to handle that. It’s almost like a switch flips and he goes black and he goes violent.

EW:  The intimacy between your character and Nicole’s is really intense, both the violence and the sex. How did you two approach that? Was it difficult?

Alex:  We had some time to get to know each before we started filming. It was important to build that trust and understanding, knowing this journey we were about to embark on. It is a very physical relationship. It’s the envy of most people when they first see this couple. It’s too good to be true. The kids, the house, the sex, everything. There is more to it than that. It muddles the line because their sex life is violent and they both get off on it. It makes it difficult for her to draw the line, for her to feel that he’s abusive, because she feels like an accomplice. But there is a difference between liking it rough in the bed and pure abuse which he crosses that line early on. It’s tough and I think that’s what makes it interesting on a character level. Because it’s tough for her to move and to accept the fact that he’s bad for her and the kids. There is a lot of love. She loves him when he’s not abusive. In those moments he’s great. And that’s what makes it an interesting story.

EW:  Career-wise, what did you think about when you took this part?

Alex: I have a feeling this is going to be my last interview ever (laughs) because after Perry Wright, I’ll never get another job. But, hell, it was worth it.

EW:  Why do you think that? Because he’s such a monster?

Alex:  (Laughs) Yeah. I’ll never play leading man, that’s for sure.

EW:  So, you’ve typecast yourself?

Alex:  Sure, but if you ever need an abusive asshole, I’m your guy (laughs).

EW:  Did you take that into account when you signed on?

Alex:  Nah, I don’t ever think about that. I played a guy who had sex with an underage teenage girl in Diary of a Teenage Girl. I’m either drawn to material or I’m not. It’s a visceral reaction. There isn’t a strategy to it. I don’t think about what it’s going to do to my career. I always know instinctively if I’m right for something or I’m not. If I’m not intrigued by the character, I shouldn’t do it. In this case, it was easy. The material was so well written. It was such a fascinating character, albeit incredibly, incredibly dark. And I was drawn to him. He wasn’t a one-dimensional bad guy. It was very interesting. In the same way Monroe in Diary of a Teenage Girl wasn’t a typical bad guy. He was a soft, sweet guy and there was a lot of darkness there as well. I guess I’m drawn to that. That’s all I’ve got. When I read something, if I don’t want to learn more about that character, it’s not going to be something for me. 

Article Source:  Nicole Sperling for EW.com (x) via EW twitter (x)

Photo credit:  bradleycramp instagram (x): "The Perfect Family" (lol!) 

Rhetorical Ink Reviews: Beauty and the Beast (2017 Live Action)

**Careful for SPOILERS below**

I will be the first to admit that I’m a HUGE Beauty and the Beast fan. I had the book as a kid, wanted to be Belle, and have had a large fascination with the story and believe it spurned me into wanting to draw more.

So, the Live Action adaptation had HUGE shoes to fill for me before even going in. I tried to look at the film as a standalone and not judge it based on the predecessor…a VERY hard task when watching, I might add.

My best friend saw it with me and she loved it! What did I think? Well, putting ten thoughts alone would not do my favorite childhood movie justice. So instead, I am doing a Top Ten Likes and Top Ten Dislikes. Careful for spoilers!

My Top Ten Likes of Beauty and the Beast (2017):

Originally posted by dailyplanetnerd

10. The set and costumes: Everything has layers and detail and colors that pop but also makes sense for the time period. I LOVED the costumes and even the yellow gown, considering the wardrobe “makes it” in this, grew on me quickly. As for the sets? They are beautifully ornate and have a classic “other worldly” look to them. I could watch the movie over and over to gawk at the scenery and character designs.

9. The Opening Scene: Nothing will ever live up to the deep voice of the narrator and the stained glass…but there was something so fresh about how we started on the Prince, how the dance unfolded, and how the Enchantress appeared. She looked gorgeous and the classic French scene was a welcome addition (more so than others…but we’ll talk of that soon). In any case, it is a worthy contrast from the beginning, when he’s surrounded by beautiful girls, to late when there’s only Belle.

8. Kevin Kline as Maurice: Kevin Kline is a fine actor, and he brings such a charm and dignity to the formerly bumbling character. I still like Maurice in the animated movie, but it makes more sense for Belle’s father to be an artist and hopeless romantic than a “world famous inventor.” Kline’s performance was a highlight for me and definitely added to the movie as a whole.

Originally posted by luuuuuke-evans

7. “Kill the Beast!” I’ll talk more about some other songs below, but this was by far my favorite number; this is EXACTLY what I was hoping for with this song in live action form. It does not disappoint. Speaking of “Kill the Beast…”

Originally posted by lukecastellan

6. We see Gaston and Lefou learning where the castle is: A big question I had as a kid was, “How did they know where to go to find the Beast?” In this, we get our answer. Lefou and Gaston actually follow Maurice to the woods, where he believes he can route them to the Beast’s castle. This backfires on him, but in any case we learn how Gaston and Lefou knew where to go in the first place.

Originally posted by wizardfrenchfries

5. Belle is more an inventor….and a teacher: It makes sense for Belle to be as learned as she is to be more of the inventor. I loved the little scene where she does her own laundry with the contraption she made and is trying to teach a little girl to read. After having to sit through a preview for a CGI movie where the boy character is an inventor and the girl, lo and behold, wants to just be a dancer…it’s nice to see “ahead of their time” people represented in a modern movie’s version of a classic time period.

Originally posted by bigbadroman

4. Lefou paying off the people to dance and help during “Gaston:”

It was a little tidbit to note for the film, but Lefou pays off the people to help dance in the “Gaston” music number; and Belle does pay for the food in the market she gets. It’s little touches like that which help to cement this story in a more “realistic” world.

Originally posted by chandelyer

3. The ensemble of side characters:

This entire cast was well-chosen. Josh Gad as Lefou? Perfection; he was born for the role! Emma Thompson as Mrs. Potts?  She’s about as close to Angela Lansbury as you can get for this role, I feel. Ewan McGregor as Lumiere? I was on the fence about this casting, but it works so well. Luke Evans as Gaston? He fits the part great. Sir Ian McKellan as Cogsworth? Again, I had no clue what to think, but he may have been my favorite in the whole side cast. Even Stanley Tucci and the Wardrobe’s actress were great choices. They really did a perfect job casting the side characters…but as for the main characters…

Originally posted by parkxiaowu

2. Dan Stevens as The Beast/The Prince:

This WAS perfect casting! I know they’ve altered the voice and distorted it to sound similar to the animated Beast. But seriously, the motion capture work on his face and his range of emotion are perfect here. It’s hard to believe, but I care more for his character as the Beast than the animated (for reasons below); plus, the main thing: He looks SO much better as the human Prince. From the opening to the end scene, he may be my favorite character, actor, and part of the film. Definitely a genius casting choice and excellent performance!

Originally posted by noplaceforsanity

1. All of the added scenes of Belle and The Beast learning about one another:

If I had one, minuscule complaint with the original Beauty and the Beast, it is that we don’t get many scenes of Belle and the Beast “falling in love” and getting to know one another. He saves her, gives her a library, and then they just sort of fall in love post-dance…obviously, it’s not a huge issue, since you’re pacing this out in movie format.

However, I feel this movie allowed more time for these two to connect. Also, they found common ground; first, with their love of literature, but second, with losing their mothers and how their father’s shaped who they were: The Prince’s with hate, and Belle’s with love. It was a beautiful duality and connection created between them and it helped to make the ending better and more satisfying.

Originally posted by partofyourtaleasoldastime

Of course, especially considering the movie is based on a staple of my childhood, it CERTAINLY has flaws, as noted below.

My Top 10 Dislikes of Beauty and the Beast (2017):

10. The obvious Enchantress:

I do like the twist of The Enchantress being Agathe, a character we see throughout the story…perhaps she’s keeping the magic strong? However, there are a lot of problematic elements of her being in the movie so much. For one thing, she saves Maurice, which is good, but then when Maurice confronts Gaston, she doesn’t do anything. She could have stopped all of our conflict! Also, at the end, while she shows up and it does make sense in a technical sense…she just vanishes. Belle doesn’t even see her…what was the point? In the animated movie, the spell was broken without her having to be there. Having her there didn’t answer questions; it created more! It just seemed awkward at times.

Originally posted by luuuuuke-evans

9. Gaston’s “post-war” blood rage?

While I appreciate them trying to flesh out Gaston’s character…this was their choice? He’s got post-war bursts of rage? I love how the animated movie treated Gaston just as the jerk-bro who becomes jealous and can’t stand that Belle chooses someone over him. Here, his villainous outbursts are “justified” by his post-war blood lust. It just seemed almost like a distraction and didn’t seem warranted for me. Gaston is a near-perfect villain. Let Luke Evans do a good job of playing him without trying to make him too complex. Gaston’s not smart enough for that.

Originally posted by luuuuuke-evans

8. The unnecessary additional songs:

Maybe I’m in a minority here, but I wasn’t crazy about the new songs. The Soundtrack of Beauty and the Beast is nearly flawless. Even the special edition with “Human Again” is okay. The Broadway songs they add…are okay. “Evermore” is not a terrible song (we’ll talk more about it below), but the song about “Sunny skies” and “Evermore” are not necessary to make the story better. If you wanted to include them in a “Director’s Cut,” that would have sufficed for me…I just didn’t see the need for them here…again, I’ll touch back on this point twice below.

Originally posted by jacobkowalskis

7. Don’t bring an arrow to a gun fight:

In the original, Gaston was a hunter, so it made sense he had multiple weapons at his disposal. It also made sense for the time period. And he hunted a lot of deer-like animals, so it seemed fitting that he would shoot an arrow at the Beast and then stab him with a knife….hunting tools for the type of game he hunted.

In this? We just full blown (literally) gun the Beast down. Gaston shoots the Beast three times in the climax. At the very least, he still uses a club like the original. It just seemed like overkill and to me, didn’t make as much sense as keeping like the original would have.

Originally posted by luuuuuke-evans

6. The rushed beginning and scenes out of place:

The opening, I loved; however, once that scene was over, the first thirty minutes seemed SO rushed! They rushed through “Belle,” then moved some scenes around, and quickly went through the reprise! There wasn’t the “wedding proposal” scene with Gaston and Belle! I did LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the reaction of Maurice and Chip, but there were little scenes that were skimmed over and rearranged that just seemed to rush the opening and didn’t let us the audience “settle down” into the film. It’s not until we’re at the scene of Belle running away from the castle that the movie starts to slow down. The editing of the movie in those places was a little disappointing to me.

Originally posted by alittlebiteverything

5. Lefou and the lack of controversy:

Okay, so the last week has been filled with news stories about how Lefou is the first openly gay character in a Disney film. It was a huge source of controversy…but….in all seriousness……you wouldn’t really know that watching this film. It’s clear he cares for Gaston, but the animated picture portrayed that as well. He shares two seconds with a male character at the very end of the movie in a brief dance…but that’s it. All that press and controversy for a tiny scene that seems inconsequential. Eh. Come on, Disney. Commit or not; don’t try to play up something that’s halfway even developed.

4. The Enchantress’s book:

I loved the extra scenes with Belle and Beast developing their relationship over the course of a few scenes. However, one comes out of nowhere and does nothing to the plot as a whole. At one point, the Beast shows her a book the Enchantress gave him as a “joke.” It is able to take them anywhere you think of; and Belle chooses the room she was born in, where her mother dies of the plague. While I DO love a few things about this: the fact that it connects Belle and the Beast more, and it explains what happened to her…it’s never used again. The book is just a one-time only plot device. The scene it was used in was SO out of place! I would have rather Belle had known why her mother died and just talked it out with the Beast than having used this forced book that logically doesn’t fit in with the story.

3. The Beast’s Song, “Evermore:”

I don’t dislike “Evermore,” I don’t…but…in the animated movie, when Belle leaves Beast, he is so heartbroken. He lets out a howl of despair, knowing his only chance of happiness has left him, potentially forever. Here, he immediately bursts into a Phantom of the Opera style musical number. Maybe upon reviewing, I’ll appreciate it. But I loved how the original was so organic and raw…this seemed almost too Broadway and too theatrical.

Originally posted by joleenalice

2. Emma Watson’s facial expressions vs. animated Belle:

I love the original because of the animation, mainly. The expressions and line work showed SO much emotion. Now, I like Emma Watson a lot as an actress. BUT, aside from the wolf scene on….her facial expressions are so subdued. This is most apparent in “Be Our Guest.” Belle in that musical number is in AWE! She is so excited, bewildered, and amazed…but here? She just smiles and watches the show. Granted, Emma Watson would have been watching a Green Screen throughout this; but STILL. She doesn’t even seem in shock or awe…and that I sorely missed in this film. Now, after the wolves attack Belle, Watson’s acting becomes more pronounced. I just wish she could have acted a little more in-character through some of the CGI numbers.

Originally posted by a-dreamers-universe

1. The cut out comedy:

When I asked my brother if he was thinking of seeing the movie, he asked about the fight scene at the end:

Brother: “Do they have the part where Lumiere burns Lefou’s butt? Or Cogsworth with the scissors?”

Me: “No.”

Brother: “What?! How could they?”

There is so much physical comedy in the original that works; here, and yes, I understand that it is “physically” impossible some of the things they do, I still was hoping there would be more of the original comedy. For example, Cogsworth taking Belle on a tour of the castle isn’t even in the FILM! “If it’s not baroque, don’t fix it.” SERIOUSLY.


Originally posted by cloudbender

THE VERDICT?

The original is near-perfect for me. Still today, it is the better film. If you love the original and are expecting a closely faithful adaptation; they try, but it’s a miss there, because some of the best parts are either condensed or left out.

If you love Beauty and the Beast, but you’re comfortable with them altering parts and want to see new additions to the story? You’ll probably like this!

The original is still better though. If you don’t want to spend the $10 at the theatre, just wait until the DVD or Blu-Ray comes out and watch the original in the meantime.

If you’ve never seen the original Beauty and the Beast? PLEASE watch that one first; it’s better. If you’ve already seen the live action one? STILL go view the animated version; you’ll appreciate it more.

Originally posted by partofyourtaleasoldastime

Things I really loved about Spiderman: Homecoming in earnest!

Spoilers!!

1. That it felt new)
Look, it needs to be said first off that Homecoming had the added pressure of not just being a good movie, but being a new and different take on the THIRD reboot of a character in 15 years. That’s a really hard thing to do, and they nailed it. Holland’s Spiderman is distinct and his own while also feeling like the character, and the world he inhabits and the story the movie tells feels Spidery without feeling like we’ve seen it in the last two reboots.

2. World building)
The Marvel universe - when it’s not featuring in its massive collab films - always needs to find a way to feel connected, and not only did Homecoming succeed at this, it also found a great way to build on the Marvel world. The Captain America PSA’s were funny, but they also really helped shaped the idea that this is a world that has had superheroes for more than half of these kids lives. Same with Keaton’s daughter’s picture at the beginning, or the game of Fuck, Marry, Kill that the girls play with The Avengers; this is a world with superheroes that feels lived in and that was great.

3. Vulture)
Speaking of world building, I loved everything about Keaton’s Vulture. Marvel villains - beyond Loki - have always been just a little bit meh, but Vulture was perfect for the story they were telling. His whole story was a fantastic “view from the bottom” look at the Marvel Universe. A regular guy (in a tough economy) who is just trying to provide for the best life for his family, and is doing so by profiting off the “scraps” of what the Avengers leave behind. I LOVED that Vulture didn’t try to take over the world, or that it wasn’t really personal for him. Yeah, he loses a job because of Tony and didn’t like him, but he was just stealing from him because he had the stuff he could steal, and not say, building a villainous and overly complicated revenge scheme because he got stood up at a party once (side eyes Iron Man 3 just a little bit).

4. Vulture and Spidey’s dynamic)
Damn, that was a reveal done right. I’ve never jumped once at a Marvel movie, and Homecoming had me do it when Liz’s mother comes into the frame behind Peter. It’s a totally innocent moment, not even really a jump scare, and that is a true testament to the tension in that scene. Also, the fact that Vulture clearly respected Peter was great; he thanks Peter for saving his daughter, doesn’t sell Peter out in jail. I kind of felt like part of the reason Peter doesn’t take Tony’s offer was because some part of Vulture’s “little guys” speech had sunk into him, and that’s a really great dynamic between hero and villain.

5. Continuity Easter eggs)
The comic heavy hints are great (like say, Donald Glover’s character as Miles Morales uncle), but I’m a sucker for in universe Easter eggs, and Homecoming delivered. Things like principle Morita having a picture of the Howling Commando he played in Captain America; The First Avenger were fantastic little nods that you didn’t have to have any comic book knowledge about but still were really rewarding.

6. Ned)
I love Ned. I loved that he was quirky and uncool and totally cool with that. I even love that he was out of shape; it’s always great to see positive portrayals of people not just of different races but of different body types, and I love that he was never bullied or made fun of for his weight. Also, I just really loved that Peter had a friend (that wasn’t Harry Osborn). I genuinely can’t remember if the past 2 Peter Parker’s actually had a friend that wasn’t Harry (and thus weighted by the knowledge he was going to end up a villain) and it was so nice to just have Peter seem like a real kid who has friends and hobbies.

7. That Peter felt like a kid)
Homecoming nailed this in a way that the last two series never really did. Admittedly, the fact that Holland is much closer to the age of the character he’s playing than the two previous helped, but the movie did a great job of it in other ways. That he’s never driven, that he’s susceptible to peer pressure and just wants to be well liked; Peter felt like a real teen who had this situation thrust upon him and that was fantastic.

8. In media res)
You cannot know how thrilled I am that Homecoming skipped the whole death of Uncle Ben and spider bite thing. The death of Uncle Ben especially; yes, it’s important to shaping the hero and the man Peter becomes, but it’s also been done twice in recent memory, and leaving it out took guts (and not even a dream sequence like say, the recent reboot of some other dead superhero parents). Instead Homecoming treats the audience like they’re smart and just alludes to it, and the spider bite, and I’m so for it. Homecoming feels like we still get to see an origin arc without all the trappings of the origin we already know, and it works 100%.

9. MJ’s new character)
Look, there’s a bit of a pin in this one, which I’ll explain at the end, but I really liked this new adaption of MJ; the little we got to see of her at least. No, she wasn’t the same character as in the comics or the Rami films, but again, I really admire the fact that they were risky enough to try new things. Also, her little arc; “I have no friends,” to “my friends are up there,” to “my friends call me MJ” was this neat transition from loner girl to decathlon captain with friends and I found it really sweet.

10. The web in the suburbs)
HAHAHA OMG this was my biggest laugh in the movie. I’ve literally joked with my sister that Spider-Man is a hero who really only works in New York (one of the most vertical cities in the world) and having that scene play out was just perfection.

11. WHAT THE FU-)
Second biggest laugh by far, but I am SO down with Aunt May knowing about Spider-Man. The “hiding my secret identity from my loved ones” is a cliche that’s worn pretty thin, and I am here for the next movie where May knows.

12. Pepper)
I don’t care what you think of Paltrow; I love Pepper Potts, and I love her relationship with Tony. I don’t even mean that on a shipper level; Tony and Pepper really have always felt to me like the best balanced, healthiest and most real MCU couple, and the fact that they were on the outs in Civil War (because of what was likely the cost of having the actress be there) sucks. Homecoming fixed that, and it did it in such a characteristic way; Tony asking for the ring as a media diversion, Happy having it for 9 years, Pepper just rolling her eyes at their antics and Tony catching the ring anyways (hinting at it being semi serious) was just this perfect 2 minute look at their dynamic.

13. Tony and Peter)
I loved that that mentoring relationship felt very true to both their characters. That at the start Tony wanted to be a mentor but didn’t really know how to and that Peter just wanted his approval and how, by the end Peter had grown into someone that deserved Tony’s respect, and that Tony had become a better mentor by being able to let him walk away and acknowledge that not joining the team was best for him. Also; “I wanted you to be better than me,” and “if you’re nothing without the suit than you shouldn’t have it,” are just great lines. A+.

14. “Come on Spiderman” and the building on top of him)
Like, that whole scene, just, perfection. Tom Holland owned that scene, and it was both agonizing to watch his pain and his desperation, and utterly uplifting to see him triumph. A+++

Thing I wasn’t so crazy about:

1 . The MJ reveal)
Look, I said there would be a pin in that and here it is. If the Vulture reveal was the perfect example of how to do a twist reveal right, this was a pretty textbook example of “a twist just for the sake of a twist.” A good twist or reveal should change the mood, the dynamics and the stakes. Finding out that the villain was the father of the girl Peter had spent the whole movie evolving his relationship did all of those things. Finding out that Zendaya’s character- who is literally called Michelle once, right before she announces herself as MJ - does none of that. Her being MJ rather than Michelle doesn’t change her arc or her impact on the movie at all, especially given how little of her we see in the movie. I honestly think it would have been much better if she’d been MJ from the beginning. Having this new iteration of MJ - who is really different from previous ones - would have given the audience time to acclimatize to her take on the character. Instead, it’s played as a reveal with utterly no stakes, and I think that’s an unfortunate sign that perhaps they didn’t believe enough in their version of the character to stand up on her own merit, which is pretty disappointing.