soleful design

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so after the “drill instructor” comment by Bendy in my recent comic,  @ceeblathers mentioned that she couldn’t help but think of Bob Ross

and given my design of Henry’s history of being drafted for WWII (causing him to leave Joey Drew Studios) coupled with Henry’s canonically way-too-chill voice, the comparison was entirely too perfect not to take advantage of

so, I present to you: Henry Ross

… Pero a mí me tocó enamorarme de una estrella especial, una estrella fugaz, de esas que de repente pasan por tu vida, te iluminan, te atrapan, te cegan, te llenan de momentos, de sonrisas y se van igual de rápido, dejando una estela de recuerdos, lágrimas y la oscura soledad.
—  Cristhian Proaño
Joan Beauchamp Procter: her best friend was a Komodo dragon and if that doesn’t entice you to read this, I don’t know what will

Joan Beauchamp Procter is a scientist every reptile enthusiast should admire.

Joan was an incredibly intelligent young woman who was chronically ill (and as a result of her chronic illness, physically disabled by her early thirties). Her health issues kept her from going to college, but that did not stop her from studying and keeping reptiles. She presented her first paper to the Zoological Society of London at the tender age of nineteen, and the society was so impressed that they hired her to help design their aquarium. In 1923, despite having no formal secondary education and despite being only 26 years old, she was hired as the London Zoo’s curator of reptiles. Now, that in and of itself is an awesome accomplishment, but Joan was absolutely not content to maintain the status quo. Nosiree, by the age of 26 Joan had already kept many exotic pets (including a crocodile!) and knew a thing or two about what needed to be done to improve their lives in captivity. So Joan got together with an architect, Edward Guy Dawber, and designed the world’s first building designed solely for the keeping of reptiles. She had some really, really great ideas. Her first big idea was to make the building differentially heated- different areas and enclosures would have different heat zones, instead of having the whole building heated to one warm temperature. She also set up aquarium lighting- the gallery itself was dark, with dim lights on individual enclosures to make things less stressful for the inhabitants. She also insisted on the use of special glass that didn’t filter out UVB. This meant that reptiles could synthesize vitamin D and prevented cases of MBD in her charges. 

But advances in enclosure design weren’t Joan’s only contribution to reptile keeping. She was also one of the first herpetologists to study albinism in snakes- she was the first to publish an identification how albinism manifests in reptile eyes differently than in mammal eyes, and stressed the importance of making accurate color plates of reptiles during life because study specimens often lose pigmentation. She also was really hands-on with many species, including crocodiles, large constrictors, and monitor lizards. Joan had this idea that if you socialize an animal and get it used to handling, then when you need to give it a vet checkup, things tend to go a lot better. This really hadn’t been done with reptiles before. She was able to identify many unstudied diseases, thanks to her patient handling of live specimens, and by being patient and going slow, she managed to get a lot of very large, dangerous creatures to trust her. One of them (that we know of) even came to like her- a Komodo dragon named Sumbawa. 

In 1928, two of the first Komodo dragons to be imported to Europe arrived at the London Zoo. One of them, named Sumbawa, came in with a nasty mouth infection. His first several months at the zoo were a steady stream of antibiotics and gentle care, and by the time he’d recovered enough for display, he had come to be tolerant of handling and human interaction. In particular, he seemed to be genuinely fond of Joan. She was their primary caretaker and wrote many of the first popular accounts of Komodo dragon behavior in captivity. While recognizing their lethal capacity, she also wrote about how smart they are and how inquisitive they could be. In her account published in The Wonders of Animal Life, she said that "they could no doubt kill one if they wished, or give a terrible bite" but also that they were “as tame as dogs and even seem to show affection.” To demonstrate this, she would take Sumbawa around on a leash and let zoo visitors interact with him. She would also hand-feed Sumbawa- pigeons and chickens were noted to be favorite food, as were eggs. 

Joan died in 1931 at the age of 34. By that time she was Doctor Procter, as the University of Chicago had awarded her an honorary doctorate. Until her death, she still remained active with the Zoological Society of London- and she was still in charge of her beloved reptiles. Towards the end of her life, Joan needed a wheelchair. But that didn’t stop her from hanging out with her giant lizard friend. Sumbawa would walk out in front of the wheelchair or beside it, still on leash- she’d steer him by touching his tail. At her death, she was one of the best-known and respected herpetologists in the world, and her innovative techniques helped shape the future of reptile care. 

Learning Graphic Design On Your Own

A Quick Note…

Everyone learns differently. Some people like to ask questions in class, others like to watch videos that they can pause and replay, and even more people could prefer to just tinker and see what happens (I’m personally a tinkerer). The first thing you should do when learning on your own (so probably online or through books) is to do some research and know how you like to learn.

So, let’s start with… what even is “Graphic Design”?

Let’s get this straight… graphic designers aren’t fine artists. They are problem solvers, visual communicators, and sometimes curators of information in an aesthetically pleasing way. We organize information and try to make the world an easier-to-understand and more beautiful place. Of course, there are other fields like advertising where we communicate to customers why they should buy certain products. Or there are User Interface/Experience designers that will develop websites and video game interfaces and design how you interact with it. Look into graphic design and see what field you want to be in. What do you want to do with graphic design?

Fun fact, the google definition says: “the art or skill of combining text and pictures in advertisements, magazines, or books.” and to that, I’d like to say we do SO MUCH MORE.

Now that you know what you’re doing…Here’s the VERY BRIEF process!
(I may make individual posts for each step later on)

  1. Learn the basics
    1. Typography, how to use the basic principles of line, shape, color, and so on is usually for everyone no matter your field.
    2. Basics like composition are also very important. If you’re into editorial then typographic spreads will be more of your focus. If you’re in web design then seeing how websites are typically laid out will be a thing to look into. Basic typography, color theory, and principles still apply!
    3. Basics and principles are a google search (or a book) away! Everyone talks about these things ALL the time.
  2. Look up inspiration and develop an “eye” for design
    1. Follow design blogs! Follow other designers! On all of your social media! (There are so many Tumblr blogs and Instagram accounts solely dedicated to graphic design curation).
  3. Look into the big names of the industry
    1. Why were they remembered? Everyone else in the field probably remembers them for that, too.
    2. What was so great about them? Apply what you learn to your own work!
    3. If they’re well known, they probably have at least decent work to get inspired from!
  4. Research is done… time to do some work!
    1. If you’re just starting out, there are some things you’re probably not used to. Doing things by hand with sharpie markers on paper will definitely help train your eye and mind to think more about communication, not pretty things. 
    2. Abstract things down into simple shapes. Then try communicating that same object with fewer shapes. Maybe only lines? Geometric style? Play around with communication! This is key when you get into icons, logos, and other visuals that require a more minimal look. 
    3. Remember, you make information more easily accessible. The best logos are easy to remember because they are simple and effective. Your work may one day need that kind of punch!
  5. The jump from traditional to digital
    1. It’s time to learn about your program(s) of choice… my biggest piece of advice would be to just mess with it. Learning on your own by trying to make something is one of the best ways to train your mind and body on how to use the programs.
    2. Try every tool. Try making basic shapes. Then make basic objects with those shapes. Then try making a person or something more complicated. Try to test every tool to see what you’d use it for!
    3. Don’t know anything or how to do something? Google it! If you’re asking there’s probably 5+ different YouTube videos, 3+ articles, and 100+ tutorials on how to do it.
  6. Let’s work on projects!
    1. Now that you’re familiar with the history, principles, other designers, and the programs… just keep on making stuff!
    2. Making your own projects (make your own website, business cards, a flyer for a club, a T-Shirt, and so on…) is my biggest recommendation on how to learn graphic design. Actually applying everything you’ve learned will make you think in a problem-solving way! Also sharing things that you’ve made that actually matter is way more fun than sharing a fancy circle you made with no context. (You can say “look at this T-Shirt I made!” instead of “look at this weird circle I made!”)
  7. Get feedback from designers and non-designers
    1. Once you’ve made stuff… ask everyone! Non-designers will give you a client’s perspective of your work. A designer’s perspective will help you grow as a designer and they may see things that you and your average person wouldn’t have noticed. (you’re always free to ask me if you’d like!)
    2. Please remember to not take feedback personally (unless they’re being rude, then just ignore them). You’re learning and growing and there’s always room for improvement. A lot of feedback is not a bad thing!
  8. Stay determined!
    1. Being a designer isn’t easy. That T-Shirt you made that took you a couple days? Someone could say they don’t get it. Other designers could say there was a better way to execute your idea. Another person may even say it looks like something else!
    2. When you design you have to expect to make revisions, rethinking, and making more revisions until it’s at a good enough place to publish. But no matter what, you have to remember that it’s not about PERFECTION. It’s about getting it DONE and learning to grow. No one is perfect, and it’s mostly subjective, so just take the criticism you agree with and don’t apply what you disagree with. As a designer, you should know what’s right, wrong, or what you should consider bringing up to other designers.
    3. KEEP MAKING MORE STUFF! You can even remake older stuff as you go on! Just keep going!

That’s my super brief process!

Now honestly, I could’ve gotten down into the nitty gritty details of each step, but this is basically how I’d suggest going about it if you want to get a head start before getting into college, or you want to just learn on your own.

If you guys have any additional questions or want me to go more in-depth about anything, feel free to let me know! :)

Dear non-autistics,

Just because we complain about the difficulties that come with being autistic doesn’t mean we want a “cure”. 

Do you complain about how light skin burns so easily because you want a cure for being white? Do you complain about police brutality against people of colour because you want a cure for being darker-skinned?

No? 

So why would you assume we complain about autism because we want to “cure” a part of who we are? 

Being autistic is just a much a part of who someone is as their skin colour.

Of course we bitch about it. We’re human

Whining is humanity’s unofficial universal pastime. If it’s summer, we whine about the heat. As soon as it gets cold we whine about that too. 

It’s like when you wish your skin was lighter so you were less discriminated  against or wish your skin was darker so you didn’t burn as much; you might say that it’s what you want, but if you were to actually wake up tomorrow with a different skin shade I’ll bet you’d feel like part of your identity was taken from you.

Then there’s the reason why we complain. 

We don’t bemoan the trials of being autistic because autism makes our life hard. 

We complain about the trials of being autistic because non-autistic society makes our life hard.

We live in a world designed solely for non-autistics and which is unwilling to make even minor adjustments to accommodate us.

There’s tons of tiny little things that can be done that has little to no effect on you but to us makes a world of difference, but society just can’t be bothered.

Y’all have nearly unanimously decided that we’re not worth caring about. And that’s what we’re complaining about.

When we complain about autism the problem we’re complaining about isn’t us

It’s you.




* Some examples of simple things you could do:

- Not telling an autistic person that they’re using their autism “as an excuse” for not being able to do something or for doing something you don’t like (e.g. being overly clumsy, fidgeting, stimming, not making eye contact, etc)

- Not judging us for quietly stimming when we need to (playing with fidget/stress toys, biting our chewy jewelry, playing with our fingers, etc)

- Not calling us “broken” because we’re different than you and we don’t meet your expectations.

- Not calling people who murder their autistic kids a “guardian angel” and “good parent”

- Not giving a parent who has murdered their kid a platform on tv to argue about how killing their perfectly healthy kid was “euthanasia”.

- Not treating non-verbal autistics like they’re dumb and  incapable of functioning.

- Not saying “I sometimes think about killing my child” near your child. We all can hear and understand everything you’re saying, regardless of whether we can vocalize a response. When you say “sometimes I think about killing my child” near your kid you just told your kid that you fantasize about killing them.

- Not treating autism like a disease. It’s a harmless genetic variation. We don’t  “suffer” from autism and we’re don’t “have” autism. We ARE autistic. That’s like saying we “have whiteness”.

- Listening to autistics when they say that groups like Autism Speaks are hate groups and that they don’t speak for us.

- Supporting autism societies run by autistics.

- Not firing us for being autistic.

- Not placing fully capable 30 year old adults in a home for seniors with dementia just because they have autism.

- Not calling autism an “epidemic”. It’s not a disease. It’s been around for millennia, the rise in diagnoses is because we’re starting to understand more about it.

I could go on, but I think you catch my drift.

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フルーツケーキ厚底スニーカー
スニーカーのソールを美味しそうなケーキ柄にしました。フカフカな履き心地と可愛いデザイン両方を味わいください。

Sponge cake sneaker
A tasty sneaker sole with a cake pattern. A soft and comfortable sole with a cute design.

best things about oscars 2k17
  • you bet your ass ima start this off with moonlight, the one and only, the immortal, the ever-present, the historic
  • suicide squad?????? i guess??
  • fantastic beasts won that costume design award solely because of that sex on legs suit colin farrel walked around in
  • viola davis
  • she’s a bullet in and of herself
  • whatever obscure problem jimmy kimmel and matt damon have that’s been going on as their talk show gag for like a decade
  • moonlight
  • auli’i cravalho got hit in the head by a flag staff
  • on that note, i love color guards
  • michael j. fox legit sang something from hamilton and lin manuel was crying
  • moonlight
  • emma stone won an oscar but my attention was on leo dicaprio because honestly why wouldn’t my attention be on leo dicaprio
  • guess who shouldve won best actor
  • that’s right casey affleck there was a mistake that award is for leo dicaprio
  • moonlight
  • leo dicaprio probably left that envelope for best actress lying around bc that’s what he’s best at and then moonlight won in a stunning upset
  • thank u

You know what’s a major pet peeve for me when it comes to arguments against raising the minimum wage? All the references to food service workers as “burger flippers”. Burger flippers are not a thing. You’re never going to see a restaurant post a sign that says “help wanted: hiring burger flippers.” “Burger flipper” is a term used pretty much exclusively to condescend to food service workers and downplay the real work and stress that goes into food service. It makes out like minimum wage workers are lazy people who are literally just standing at a grill, occasionally moving a spatula, all day, mindlessly, and that is their one and only responsibility, which anyone who has ever worked in food service can tell you is not what that job entails. It’s rhetoric used solely to designate them inferior. It doesn’t reflect the reality of minimum wage food service work. It’s annoying.