solar barque

The sun god was the ultimate source of light, energy, and life. The first sunrise, when the sun emerged as a shining bird or golden child from dark watery chaos, was the most important event in Egyptian myth. Ra merged with the primeval form of the creator to make the cosmos and its laws. He ruled as King of the Gods, first on earth and later from the heavens. Ra was born to his mother the sky goddess each morning. He passed through many transformations before being absorbed back into her each evening. Alternatively, the progress of the sun was pictured as a voyage across the skies above and below the earth. Each night the divine crew of the solar barque had to overcome the forces of chaos so that Ra could revive the sleeping dead and renew the world.
—  Egyptian Mythology; A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses and Traditions of Ancient Egypt by Geraldine Pinch

mizzfortune asked:

The Set vs Ap/ep response with the solar barque, specifically the image of the sun, Ap/ep and Set's outline, do you have that piece without the words? I love it to death, and if it's alright, would love to print it out and put it in my spiritual area.

Oh!! Thank you, I’m glad you like it! I actually liked how that one panel came out myself, and glad to know others seem to as well o)9 I might try to re draw it / polish the panel into a larger scene one day when I have the drive!

And sure I don’t mind if you wanna print it out, thanks for asking! It’s kinda small though since it was intended as a quick ask drawing at the time, but I went back to remove the text and fix a few small details.

Here’s a LINK to the full-sized panel without the text, which is also posted below:

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Hey guys! Here’s a small compilation of some of the artwork I’ve drawn in reply to questions submitted to the DEITIES blog, which made for a pretty prolific couple of weeks, art wise!

This is only about 1/3 of all the individual drawings I’ve drawn this round, but they’re some of more polished ones that are my personal favorites. The DEITIES askbox is currently closed, but will reopen after I catch up with my work this month, and create more content for the project.

In the meanwhile, you can check out the DEITIES asks tag on the blog to find a lot more drawings, as well as the text answers that accompany many of the replies o)7

spirit-of-an-exile asked:

Space Pirate AU

Rose Sonder is the cabin boy on The Jay’s Wings, a solar barque in pursuit of treasure across the galaxies that surround Montressor and the Crescent Spaceport. It’s always her preference to stay near a planet, but sometimes they end up as far afield as the Horsehead Nebula before returning to port.

Like almost all humans in this day and age, Rose is an alien hybrid- specifically, she has elemental blood. Her skin and hair are constantly warm, as though she holds the heat of stars beneath them. If her hands weren’t so constantly busy with dishes, laundry, and the like, she might be able to summon fire.

The strength in her calloused palms can do a lot more than that, though; she’s skilled with the various knots needed around a ship, and good to have on your side in a fight. She’s not afraid to fight dirty, either.

Two knives are on her person at all times, one in her belt and the other in her boot. Both of them are old; she’s had them since she was fourteen, and she keeps the one in her belt well-sharpened to cut food at dinner (as well as prepping ingredients in the kitchen). The one in her boot is a little more sinister. It’s intended solely for combat, and has a wicked, partially serrated edge.

Like everyone in space, Sonder’s heard of Treasure Planet, but dismisses it for the most part as a legend. “Bring me its coin and its gems,” she’ll tell people who speak of it, “and I’ll believe you.” By the time Jim Hawkins and the crew of the RLS Legacy find the planet, Sonder has long since retired, deciding to run a tavern rather than risk her life any further with piracy.

Much solar mythology was expressed by images rather than narratives. The solar cycle could be summarized by showing Khepri (the scarab beetle), Ra-Horakhty (a falcon-headed man), and Ra-Atum (a mature man wearing the Double Crown) together in the solar barque. Khepri was the self-generating sun of dawn. Ra-Horakhty (Ra-Horus of the Double Horizon) was the triumphant sun who rose in the east as ruler. Ra-Atum was the weary setting sun whose death was an essential part of the cycle of renewal. The sun god could also be depicted with four rams’ heads representing his four bad (souls or manifestations). The four souls are often named as Ra, Khepri, Atum, and Osiris. In some Underworld Books, Ra mysteriously merges with the corpse of Osiris, the ruler of the underworld. When they become “the United One”, the dead can reawaken and the world can be remade.
—  Egyptian Mythology; A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses and Traditions of Ancient Egypt by Geraldine Pinch
The sun god who was the ultimate source of light, energy, and life. The first sunrise, when the sun emerged as a shining bird or golden child from dark watery chaos, was the most important event in Egyptian myth. Ra merged with the primeval form of the creator to make the cosmos and its laws. He ruled as King of the Gods, first on earth and later from the heavens. Ra was born to his mother the sky goddess each morning. He passed through many transformations before being absorbed back into her each evening. Alternatively, the progress of the sun was pictured as a voyage across the skies above and below the earth. Each night the divine crew of the solar barque had to overcome the forces of chaos so that Ra could revive the sleeping dead and renew the world.
—  Egyptian Mythology; A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses and Traditions of Ancient Egypt by Geraldine Pinch
The solar barque was called the Boat of Millions because all the gods and all the souls of the blessed dead might be needed in its crew. The crew is sometimes referred to as rowing the solar barque, but this is never shown. Instead, a number if deities, often in the form of jackals or cobras, can be depicted towing the boat along. In some Underworld Books there are two solar barques, The Day Boat (Mandjet) and the Night Boat (Mesektet)…..The sun god can be shown alone in the Day Boat, but in the Night Boat other deities usually stand on deck ready to defend the vulnerable nocturnal form of the sun. The dangers included submerged sandbanks and attacks by hostile crocodiles, turtles, and snakes. The worst of these enemies was the monstrous chaos serpent /A/p/e/p/. Sometimes the solar barque was surrounded or followed by a whole fleet of small boats carrying various protective deities and emblems. The prow and stern posts of these boats terminate in crowns, snakes, or human and animal heads.
—  “Egyptian Mythology; A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt” by Geraldine Pinch
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Among other things, Hatshepsut, the woman who would be king (she gave the royal scribes all manner of headache, since “pharaoh” required the masculine form, but she was female, something along the lines of “Her Majesty, King Hatshepsut,” poor chickens), effected this lovely solar barque to be built (and thereafter commemorated in stone) (and much thereafter postally commemorated!) during her reign as pharaoh in the Eighteenth Dynasty, New Kingdom, Ancient Egypt.  Issued for the Congrès International de Navigation, held in Cairo in 1926, these stamps show a ship from Hatshepsut’s fleet, sailing to the Land of Punt for trade.  [The Land of Punt……well, it’s either along the Horn of Africa, or along the Arabian Peninsula, or it encompasses both, or it’s somewhere else altogether……]  [In the original relief, the water is populated by fishes so well-documented that their species are easily identified by any decent Nile/Red Sea inhabitant worth his or her reeds/salt.]  After her death, Hatshepsut’s name was erased from the official record, her temples were destroyed, and her successor (Thutmosis III) attempted to exact upon his stepmama the fate that all Ancient Egyptians feared and reviled above any other–to have one’s name forgotten.  Luckily, Thutmosis III (as in most things) wasn’t as efficient as he could have been and we still get to dream about Hatshepsut, “the first great woman in history of whom we are informed,” as Breasted used to say.

Stamp details:
Issued on: December 9, 1926
From: Cairo, Egypt
MC #109-111