software network

I code for fun until it isn’t any fun anymore, then I code because I need to finish. But no code is ever finished. I shall code forever!

Decommissioned air traffic control computers? Yeah, they run Doom and Quake.

As reported by @obscuritory:

MAGFest 2017 had an old tech museum with a bespoke tribute to id Software, including a networked 8-computer setup for playing multiplayer FPSes. But rather than hooking up normal desktops, the organizers used devices originally intended for air traffic control. These giant bricks, which look like external hard drives with a bunch of ports glued on the side, came with surprisingly powerful GPUs given their original purpose. They ran Windows XP, and with everything air traffic-related ripped out, they make for solid, portable Doom and Quake machines.

It’s unclear how the staff even got these things, but rest well knowing that the machines that watch our skies can also serve agitating skeletons.

2

A computer program taught itself to dance and after 2 days it’s better than you

The Lulu Art Group and deep learning software company Peltarion developed a system that can learn the style of a human choreographer and then produce its own unique dance material. Using a Microsoft Kinect camera, they captured five hours of contemporary dance motion from a professional dancer and then fed the data into an artificial neural network. The results went from laughable to laudable pretty quickly.

Follow @the-future-now

Your mind when you start to run the debugger . . .
Microsoft is expanding its IoT offerings

(BI Intelligence)

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence IoT Briefing subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

Microsoft is expanding its IoT offerings, announcing three new services that augment its cloud-based Azure IoT suite. Here’s what’s new:

  • The firm launched IoT Central, a new service that can deploy and manage the entirety of a company’s IoT ecosystem, including the devices, cloud functionality, analytics, networks, and software. Microsoft’s offering is essentially IoT-as-a-service and is one of the only solutions on the market that can manage all these aspects in full.
  • Microsoft is also updating Azure IoT offerings. It’s expanding Azure Stream Analytics, an existing platform, to edge computing systems, which analyze data where it’s generated rather than in the cloud or at remote data centers. Microsoft is also launching a new tool, based on an existing Azure offering, that leverages the cloud to analyze time-series data, something commonplace in the IoT. This gives Microsoft customers more tools that allow them to analyze data more quickly than they could with the company’s previous offerings.

The move could bring the IoT to companies for whom it was previously out of reach, which benefits Microsoft. A lot of companies don’t have the resources or people to make the most out of IoT solutions, and basically outsourcing their management to Microsoft via IoT Central may be an attractive option. The service should help Microsoft expand the reach of its IoT solutions to new segments of the market.

And the new offerings could give Microsoft a competitive advantage. It’s logistically easier and less expensive for a company to get all IoT services bundled from a single player than to rely on different ones for different pieces of the ecosystem. Microsoft’s wide array of expanded services coupled with the convenience of IoT Central — Microsoft’s IoT offerings are some of the only in the market that can implement and manage all aspects of a company’s IoT ecosystem — could distinguish it from competitors like Cisco’s Jasper or Amazon’s AWS IoT, and help it gain a lead in the space.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing rapidly as companies around the world connect thousands of devices every day. But behind those devices, there’s a sector worth hundreds of billions of dollars supporting the IoT. 

Platforms are the glue that holds the IoT together, allowing users to take full advantage of the disruptive potential of connected devices. These platforms allow the IoT to achieve its transformational potential, letting businesses manage devices, analyze data, and automate the workflow.

Peter Newman, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on the evolving IoT platform ecosystem. This report sizes the market and identifies the primary growth drivers that will power the IoT platform space in the next five years. It also profiles many of the top IoT platforms by discussing key trends in the platform industry such as platform consolidation. 

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • The IoT platforms market is set to expand rapidly in the years to come, with current leading platforms expanding and others entering the space.
  • We define the key categories into which IoT platforms fall: building block open platforms, closed high-end platforms, and product management platforms.
  • We highlight the ways platforms can help companies reach the full five stage potential of the IoT.

In full, the report:

  • Explains the coming growth of the IoT platforms.
  • Profiles a number of leading platforms.
  • Highlights the central role platforms play in the IoT.
  • Looks to the future of the IoT platforms market.

Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> START A MEMBERSHIP
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> BUY THE REPORT


More From Business Insider

Radia Joy Perlman (born 1951) is a software designer and network engineer. She is most famous for her invention of the spanning-tree protocol (STP), which is fundamental to the operation of network bridges, while working for Digital Equipment Corporation. She also made large contributions to many other areas of network design and standardization, such as link-state protocols, including TRILL, which she invented to correct some of the shortcomings of spanning-trees.

She is sometimes referred to as the “Mother of the Internet,” a title which she dislikes.

Her work transformed the Ethernet protocol from using a few nodes over a limited distance, into something able to create large networks.

Perlman is the author of one textbook on networking and coauthor of one textbook on network security. She holds more than 100 issued patents.“

Source

nytimes.com
Welcome to the Failure Age!

By: Adam Davidson
NY Times, Nov 12, 2014

Industries that once seemed resistant to change are only now entering the early stages of major disruption. A large percentage of the health-care industry, for example, includes the rote work of recording, storing and accessing medical records. But many companies are currently devising ways to digitize our medical documents more efficiently. Many economists believe that peer-to-peer lending, Bitcoin and other financial innovations will soon strike at the core of banking by making it easier to receive loans or seed money outside a traditional institution. Education is facing the threat of computer-based learning posed by Khan Academy, Coursera and other upstart companies. Government is changing, too. India recently introduced a site that allows anybody to see which government workers are showing up for their jobs on time (or at all) and which are shirking. Similarly, Houston recently developed a complex database that helps managers put an end to runaway overtime costs. These changes are still new, in part because so many large businesses benefit from the old system and use their capital to impede innovation. But the changes will inevitably become greater, and the results will be drastic. Those four industries — health care, finance, education and government — represent well more than half of the U.S. economy. The lives of tens of millions of people will change.

Some professions, however, are already demonstrating ways to embrace failure. For example, there’s an uncharacteristic explosion of creativity among accountants. Yes, accountants: Groups like the Thriveal C.P.A. Network and the VeraSage Institute are leading that profession from its roots in near-total risk aversion to something approaching the opposite. Computing may have commoditized much of the industry’s everyday work, but some enterprising accountants are learning how to use some of their biggest assets — the trust of their clients and access to financial data — to provide deep insights into a company’s business. They’re identifying which activities are most profitable, which ones are wasteful and when the former become the latter. Accounting once was entirely backward-looking and, because no one would pay for an audit for fun, dependent on government regulation. It was a cost. Now real-time networked software can make it forward-looking and a source of profit. It’s worth remembering, though, that this process never ends: As soon as accountants discover a new sort of service to provide their customers, some software innovator will be seeking ways to automate it, which means those accountants will work to constantly come up with even newer ideas. The failure loop will continue to close.

Lawyers, too, are trying to transform computers from a threat into a value-adding tool. For centuries the legal profession has made a great deal of money from drawing up contracts or patent applications that inevitably sit in drawers, unexamined. Software can insert boilerplate language more cheaply now. But some computer-minded lawyers have found real value in those cabinets filled with old contracts and patent filings. They use data-sniffing programs and their own legal expertise to cull through millions of patent applications or contracts to build never-before-seen complex models of the business landscape and sell it to their clients.

The manufacturing industry is going through the early stages of its own change. Until quite recently, it cost tens of millions of dollars to build a manufacturing plant. Today, 3-D printing and cloud manufacturing, a process in which entrepreneurs pay relatively little to access other companies’ machines during downtime, have drastically lowered the barrier to entry for new companies. Many imagine this will revitalize the business of making things in America. Successful factories, like accounting firms, need to focus on special new products that no one in Asia has yet figured out how to mass produce. Something similar is happening in agriculture, where commodity grains are tended by computer-run tractors as farming entrepreneurs seek more value in heritage, organic, local and other specialty crops. This has been manifested in the stunning proliferation of apple varieties in our stores over the past couple of years.

Every other major shift in economic order has made an enormous impact on the nature of personal and family life, and this one probably will, too. Rather than undertake one career for our entire working lives, with minimal failure allowed, many of us will be forced to experiment with several careers, frequently changing course as the market demands — and not always succeeding in our new efforts. In the corporate era, most people borrowed their reputations from the large institutions they affiliated themselves with: their employers, perhaps, or their universities. Our own personal reputations will now matter more, and they will be far more self-made. As career trajectories and earnings become increasingly volatile, gender roles will fragment further, and many families will spend some time in which the mother is a primary breadwinner and the father is underemployed and at home with the children. It will be harder to explain what you do for a living to acquaintances. The advice of mentors, whose wisdom is ascribed to a passing age, will mean less and less.

To succeed in the innovation era, says Daron Acemoglu, a prominent M.I.T. economist, we will need, above all, to build a new set of institutions, something like the societal equivalent of those office parks in Sunnyvale, that help us stay flexible in the midst of turbulent lives. We’ll need modern insurance and financial products that encourage us to pursue entrepreneurial ideas or the education needed for a career change. And we’ll need incentives that encourage us to take these risks; we won’t take them if we fear paying the full cost of failure. Acemoglu says we will need a far stronger safety net, because a society that encourages risk will intrinsically be wealthier over all.

History is filled with examples of societal innovation, like the United States Constitution and the eight-hour workday, that have made many people better off. These beneficial changes tend to come, Acemoglu told me, when large swaths of the population rally together to demand them. He says it’s too early to fully understand exactly what sorts of governing innovations we need today, because the new economic system is still emerging and questions about it remain: How many people will be displaced by robots and mobile apps? How many new jobs will be created? We can’t build the right social institutions until we know the precise problem we’re solving. “I don’t think we are quite there yet,” he told me.

Generally, those with power and wealth resist any significant shift in the existing institutions. Robber barons fought many of the changes of the Progressive Era, and Wall Street fought the reforms of the 1930s. Today, the political system seems incapable of wholesale reinvention. But Acemoglu said that could change in an instant if enough people demand it. In 1900, after all, it was impossible to predict the rise of the modern corporation, labor unions, Social Security and other transformative institutions that shifted gains from the wealthy to workers.

We are a strange species, at once risk-averse and thrill-seeking, terrified of failure but eager for new adventure. If we discover ways to share those risks and those rewards, then we could conceivably arrive somewhere better. The pre-modern era was all risk and no reward. The corporate era had modest rewards and minimal risks. If we conquer our fear of failure, we can, just maybe, have both.

  • people when they talk to their dogs: hey there boy, did you miss me? you're so cute, yes you are, yes you are
  • me when i talk to my dog: hey dude do you wanna sit next to me i just got this new graphics tablet and i'm gonna try out some different software and watch cartoon network. what do you think happens when you die