social responsibility

anonymous asked:

How is taking an implicit bias test or being aware of my prejudices going to make my life better? Why does it matter so much?

I do not know that taking a test or being aware of your bias on its own will make your life any better, but it does give you the opportunity to do something. I see that awareness as pretty important, as it is difficult to change what you do not acknowledge. Let me use myself as an example. A few years ago I discovered that I am much more likely to interrupt a woman than I am to interrupt a man. This surprised me because a) I did want to be doing that, b) I was not trying to do that, and c) it did not reflect my values, beliefs and aspirations. It is not ideal to interrupt people, but it becomes a different kind of problem when it falls on some more than others. Being aware of it allowed me to do something about it…doing something about it meant that I was doing a better job of being the person that I claimed to be, by more consistently delivering on my values, beliefs, and aspirations through my behavior. It also changed the lived experience of the people that interact with me. Each of us have to pick our battles, but I think this is an issue that matters greatly. I believe we could take a little better care of each other, we could make decisions based more on fact and less on fiction, we could have organizations, communities, institutions, and policies with fewer consequences for real or perceived identity. I believe  we have some obligation to be intentional about how we treat others. If we do not wish to be judged unfairly, then we have to do our fair share of work as well.    

At the risk of sounding “anti-feminist” again, Canon Rebecca White is an indecent human being.

I can forgive her for being daft enough to believe the drunken ramblings of a heartbroken, vulnerable man.

I can forgive her for having self-esteem that is so low she didn’t believe that man when he told her countless times that he didn’t want to be with her; but the one time he says it whilst drunk she believes him.

What I can’t forgive her for is having sex with him whilst he was that inebriated. For having sex with him whilst his judgement was that badly impaired.

If she really loved Robert, she would have turned him down and taken care of him. Just like Aaron did when put in a similar situation back in 2015.

If she really loved him, she would have called his sister and brother-in-law who were worried about him.

If she really loved him, she would have asked him the next day when he was sober, if he meant what he said.

She is not in love with Robert, she is obsessed with him. That is one part of her character that has remained consistent.

Robert has some pretty big flaws. Yes, he did use her in the past. Yes, he was mean to her. Two things Rebecca doesn’t even give a shite about.

The fact that she slept with him whilst he was drunk makes her the indecent human being in this scenario. Just like Ross was the indecent human being when he slept with a very drunk Kerry.

I hope the “feminists” who support Rebecca for being a woman are aware of this. I hope the people who ship Ross over Robert with Aaron are also aware of this.

The fact that Emmerdale continues to ignore the issue of consent makes me angry and uncomfortable. So for the sake of some of us not wanting to puke when thinking about her, I still hope the incident didn’t actually happen. Or it turns out that she has erotomania, and has been hallucinating everything.

4 years ago today, 1,100 garments workers were killed in the collapse of the Rana Plaza in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This is price of the West’s disposable and materialistic culture: this is the true cost of that $14.99 sweater. Say NO to fast fashion: opt for the socially responsible. Educate yourself. Question the system. Question what you purchase. Ask yourself, “who made my clothes?

Instagram Is A Tiny Speck In The Ginormous Oil Painting of Life

One topic I think about obsessively: Instagram. More specifically, the psychological effect it has on me.

A while ago I posted a tweet saying I felt conflicted about social media, and the responses I got were surprising. People said that Facebook gave them anxiety, only going on certain sites when their mood was stable, whilst others deleted and re-activated their accounts regularly.

Illustration by Ana Galvan

I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with these platforms but they have so many pros that it makes them hard to quit. They connect me to like-minded people, are informative, make me laugh and give me an instant connection to my fanbase. It’s amazing to feel a level of relation in real time. However, in the last year I’ve noticed that every time I go on Instagram I feel kind of flat + zapped afterwards, like somebody has literally sat on my brain for 5 minutes. It’s oddly deflating.

Social media apps are designed to make us addicted to them. Human behaviour is reward based and each time we get a “like” or a message, our brains release a hit of dopamine, which makes us feel rrrreeeeal good (until the dopamine level drops and we feel real bad). Instagram is basically digital meth. So, for the past year I’ve been deleting the app off my phone for large periods of time, then re-downloading it if I want to post something. Interestingly, the feeling I get upon returning is always the same: I’ve missed nothing!

I understand social media’s appeal most when in relation to constructing a fantasy world. I’ve used it as a creative tool on every album I’ve made. Tumblr was key to “Electra Heart” and Twitter was key to “FROOT”. But what at first seemed like an opportunity to communicate our thoughts in an uncensored way has become a vehicle for us to present ourselves in the way that we would like to be seen by others. And this is what makes me feel weird about posting sometimes. A review I read of the film ’Ingrid Goes West’ nailed this feeling: “We use these platforms to lie and intentionally curate our lives”. The curating part hits a chord with me. It makes me feel icky, because I’ve surely, if subconsciously, done this - the majority of us have if we’re using the platform. How do I get around that and use it in a healthier way? Do I just delete the whole thing or do I need to be aware of the reason I want to post something? i.e. Is it to share an image I love, or is to make people think of me in a certain way? The latter creeps me out. It scares me.

Illustration by Allegra Lockstadt

Recently, a friend said he had been going through a difficult period, so he hadn’t gone on Instagram for about a month. “Why would I? Everyone is having such a great time”. Ohhh, the digital illusion of happiness. OK, some people are genuinely having a great time, and they want to share that great time with you, but they’re not having a good time all the time. And that’s the key to remember when we’re embarking on a scrolling spree into the darkest depths of existential hell at 2am. Social media is a tiny speck in the ginormous oil painting of human life. We all have problems. We present the good parts of ourselves because it’s anathema to document the true nature of our lives, which inevitably consist of moments of disappointment, loneliness and embarrassment. None of these things look pretty or cool (no, not EVEN if you put the Mayfair filter on top of them), and I can totally see how it all started out innocently. We all love sharing special moments, but because these moments hold social currency online, we’re now doing only that. It’s easy to see how people can feel disappointed when their own lives don’t measure up in a similar way.

Illustration by Lan Truong

We’re still in the infancy of the internet, trying to navigate technology in a way that is beneficial to our lives, but I sense a shift towards a desire to portray our lives more realistically. I notice more people sharing an experience or story in the caption of a selfie/ photograph that provides more of a picture of their life than the actual photo ever could. But I still wonder how we can evolve online culture into a space that is less image-focused/ self-driven, because I worry about the psychological effects that an image-focused culture might have on a young person’s self-esteem. 20 years ago, posting a stream of pictures of only my face would have been considered borderline narcissistic, but now it’s normal. And I’m not judging this - I’m talking from the perspective of someone who has done this a’plenty and who has been a part of that culture, particularly at the height of an album campaign. Maybe all Instagram has done is magnify what seems to have always been true, that humans value beauty to excess.

Ok, I’ll end this post by saying this: If I never go on Instagram again, my life won’t lack anything because of it. Assuming I use it 20 minutes a day, I’ll get back 122 hours a year - for free! The reality is, I’ll probably continue to use it, but it’s important to me to see these platform for what they are, not what they appear to be. They’re addictive, comparative, take my time and give little back in return.

I’ll leave you with my fave comment which came from @FKASimon.

Quite, Simon, Quite.

Love, Marina

Ask a question or a share a thought here!

A problem with “behavior is communication”

In certain contexts, just about everything a disabled person does will result in someone following them around with a clipboard, taking notes on their behavior, and designing a behavior plan for them.

This is often called ‘listening to what the behavior is communicating’ or ‘keeping in mind that behavior is communication.’

I know that nothing I’ve ever done was intended to communicate ‘please put me on a behavior plan’. If anyone asked me, they would know with certainty that I don’t want them to do anything of the sort.

I’m not alone in this. Very few people would willingly consent to intense data collection of the kind involved in behavior analysis. Far fewer people would willingly consent to the ways in which that data is used to control their behavior. 

A lot of people never get asked. People do these things to them that very few people would willingly consent to — without asking, and without considering consent to be a relevant consideration.

Somehow, an approach that involves ignoring what someone might be thinking gets called ‘listening to what is being communicated’.

That is neither ethical nor logical. Behaviors don’t communicate; people do. If you want to understand what someone is thinking, you have to listen to them in a way that goes beyond what any behavior plan can do.

Collecting data is not the same as listening, modifying behavior is not the same as understanding what someone is thinking, and disabled people are fully human. 

The house in a horoscope is WHERE stuff happens.
The sign in a horoscope is HOW stuff happens.

Say you have Venus in Pisces in the 3rd house. 

here would be an enjoyment in talking, the desire (Venus) to verbally (3rd house) relate (Venus). Talking is the sphere of life Venus and Pisces expresses itself through. 

In terms of house rulership

Venus “rules” both peaceful Taurus and socially responsive Libra. So when Venus is in either of these two signs she expresses most powerfully.
In fact the rulership theme is so strong, a connection can be made in the birth chart between where a planet is and where it rules. 

Look at this chart above. The individual has Sun in Gemini in the 1st house, the turquoise symbol. The Sun rules Leo and Leo is the ruler of the person’s 3rd house, the red symbol. If you look to where the Sun is in the chart, up in the 1st house, it makes the Sun the ruler of the 1st and 3rd house. The sun falls into the third house of communication if placed in Leo where it rules, it creates a connection between these two houses. So the clever self presentation gains a strong verbal component (third house). And I assure you this person loves (sun) to talk (third).  By tying together self presentation (1st house) with the house of communication (3rd house) you unearth a POCKET OF CONSCIOUSNESS, an emphasis in personality.

Whenever I say that a social skills test for a job that doesn’t require social skills is unreasonable, people respond by saying “but every job requires social skills”.

Typical abled person response. Social skills come natural to you, so you don’t realize that there are different levels of social skills.

Would it be reasonable to expect job applicants to perform a body builder’s workout just because they’ll sometimes have to lift 20 lbs.?

Would it be reasonable to expect job applicants to solve multivariable calculus problems just because they’ll sometimes have to count things?

If not, then it’s not reasonable to expect job applicants to answer trick questions on the spot and deliver a convincing sales pitch while maintaining perfect body language just because they’ll sometimes have to say hi to their coworkers.

Like, in the US, most obese people are POOR, because unhealthy, high calorie, high fat, high salt foods are actually much cheaper than healthy foods. Our food system and health system are fucked and bizarre. I can get a cheese burger from McDonalds for less than a bag of carrots.

You are fighting the good fight when you said this @fandomsandfeminism, but I just need to correct this bit of misinformation so you can continue fighting with the right facts on your side. [source thread; cw fat phobia]

Poor people, and especially poor people of color, are indeed more likely to be fat than their richer and/or white counterparts. But the reason is not because “unhealthy” food is cheaper. 

Food insecurity is one important reason that poorer people are fatter. But the processes by which food insecurity leads to fatness has less to do with the types of foods people eat and more to do with the metabolic changes that result from cyclical starvation. [source]

 Also, the stress of social oppression changes people’s biochemistry in such a way that becoming fat is more likely. Stress hormones tip the balance towards growing the fat organ, even when food is scarce and people are malnourished. [source]

And being fat actually offers protection against many of the diseases that are caused by the stress of oppression and poverty – including cardiovascular disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, and others. Once people develop these diseases of social oppression, being fat is actually a good thing. [source]

 Also, white supremacy is based in part on valuing a thin body type that is more common among white people of European ancestry, whereas many of the racial and ethnic groups that are marginalized under white supremacy also happen to be fatter, or at least, prone to fatness under certain circumstances. Old timey racists basically latched onto fat phobia as a means of further oppressing and excluding the people they wanted to oppress and exclude. [source]

So basically, poor people are fat for a whole host of reasons that have nothing to do with the cost of McDonalds. That is actually just a fat phobic myth that allows privileged people to “blame” poor fat people for their body size and the poor health status that is incorrectly attributed to that body size. It’s easy to avoid responsibility for social oppression when poor people are just fat and sick because they make made food choices, am I right? Yuck. [read more]

I know you wouldn’t want to perpetuate that type of harmful and abusive ideology, so it’s a good idea if you – and all of us – stop spreading that myth around!