social history'

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White women need to deal with the fact that most of you voted for Trump. It’s the not the job of black women or any marginalised and oppressed person to take responsibility for the actions of their oppressor or to educate their oppressor.

PSA: the main reason that Britain never had a European-style mass fascist movement in the 1930s is because socialists, Jews, trade unionists, black folk and queer people physically dismantled the Blackshirt movement in its infancy by disrupting meetings, toppling stages and assaulting prominent fascists. This meant it never reached critical mass as a street gang capable of controlling public space and providing a pole of attraction for white, working-class youth - a fundamental precondition for the exercise of political power independent of the state by fascist Parties.

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1939-1945

Celebrating African-American Social Dance

This is the Bop. The Bop is a type of social dance. Dance is a language, and social dance is an expression that emerges from a community. A social dance isn’t choreographed by any one person. It can’t be traced to any one moment. Each dance has steps that everyone can agree on, but it’s about the individual and their creative identity Because of that, social dances bubble up, they change, and they spread like wildfire. They are as old as our remembered history.

In African-American social dances, we see over 200 years of how African and African-American traditions influenced our history. The present always contains the past. And the past shapes who we are and who we will be.

Now, social dance is about community and connection; if you knew the steps, it meant you belonged to a group. But what if it becomes a worldwide craze? Enter the Twist.

It’s no surprise that the Twist can be traced back to the 19th century, brought to America from the Congo during slavery. But in the late ‘50s, right before the Civil Rights Movement, the Twist is popularized by Chubby Checker and Dick Clark. Suddenly, everybody’s doing the Twist: white teenagers, kids in Latin America, making its way into songs and movies. Through social dance, the boundaries between groups become blurred.

The story continues in the 1980s and '90s. Along with the emergence of hip-hop, African-American social dance took on even more visibility, borrowing from its long past, shaping culture and being shaped by it. Today, these dances continue to evolve, grow and spread.

Why do we dance? To move, to let loose, to express.

Why do we dance together? To heal, to remember, to say: “We speak a common language. We exist and we are free.”

From the TED-Ed Lesson The history of African-American social dance - Camille A. Brown

Camille A. Brown is a choreographer fusing dance and social commentary to explore race, sexuality and femininity.

Title Design by Kozmonot Animation Studio 

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt speaking in Syracuse at the New York Democratic State Convention in 1936.

FDR’s satirical rebuke against Republicans who opposed Social Security and the New Deal during the 1936 election.

80 years later the very same Republican Party used the same rhetoric unironically to justify taking away health insurance from 20 million Americans.

i also think this new trend of neo-victorian purity culture in fandom that ridicules people for shipping “bad” ships and attacks writers whose fics have “problematic” content is subtly tied to fandom’s new visibility and conditional mainstream acceptance. because of twitter and the increasing celebrity and showrunner interaction with fans, and because representation politics have somehow melded with respectability politics, there’s this push to “cleanse” ourselves of weird, freaky, disturbing, embarrassing content and present ourselves to the world as just “normal” people who love tv shows and books. because if they see we’re normal and cool, they’ll listen to us right? they’ll respect our demands right? they’ll give us our ships right? nope! instead we’re experiencing a massive dearth in fandom creativity because people are only invested in supporting and uplifting canon ships and canon stories, and instead of looking to ourselves for creativity and representation we’re depending on showrunners who’ve never had our best interests at heart. and honestly eff that. i don’t care about being seen as “normal”. i’m a weirdo! i’m a freak! fandom is weird and freaky and i’m okay with that! in fact, there’s power in that. we don’t need some stamp of approval from showrunners and celebrities, and we certainly don’t need to justify why we write or desire certain content in our fics. be weird! be freaky! be embarrassing! own it! it’s the only thing that’s truly ours.