so the choice is yours

@fireturnedflesh   

i   had

to   make

some

icons

of   her

because

i  mean

Shiro x Shy reader- Fight Pt.2

Hey guys, Pt.2 to my first one-shot!! 

P/C = Paladin Colour, so if you were blue, it would blue then [Object]

W/O/C= Weapon Of Choice, so what weapon you want it to be, unless specified.

Your shadow sloped silently a long the walls, as you walked to the training deck. It was the dead of night, a time when you knew Keith would retire to his bunk so that you could fight alone. You had your p/c baeyard clutched in your hand. You sighed, only to hear from behind you, “You okay?” You gasped, turning around, your baeyard glowing as it formed into a w/o/c. It was Shiro, smiling down at you, and you cowered, just a bit, not so much that it was noticeable, “W-w-what?” You stuttered, even your bitterness couldn’t stop you from acting shy,

“I just wanted to know if you were okay, only I’ve been watching you, and you’ve seemed sad.”

“I-I’m f-fine, i-it’s r-really n-none o-of y-your b-business,” You stepped back, expecting to touch the wall, expecting to be cornered, but you didn’t touch anything, and fell, your arm flying upwards. Shiro caught it with his prosthetic arm and pulled you up, unintentionally roughly. You winced, “Sorry!” And as he set you on your feet, switching his hands to your shoulder to steady you. You didn’t say anything. 

He sighed, “Listen, Y/N, please, speak to me, ever since I beat you in that fight, you’ve been-” Realisation crossed his face, “The fight, you’ve been brooding over the fight, not speaking because I beat you in a fight,” He looked disgusted, and you held back tears, which had suddenly pooled in your eyes. It was dark, so Shiro didn’t notice, “I-I, I, h-haven’t b-been b-brooding!” You said timidly, yet loudly at the same time, “That’s what it sound like to me, if you weren’t brooding, why ignore the team? Why become uncooperative? Are you that wrapped on winning? Are you that much of a-” You didn’t know what else he was going to say, because you lifted your hand and slapped Shiro around the face, tears openly flowing down your face, as you stared up at him, “Don’t you dare speak to me! I am not a bitch! I am not selfish! I am not brooding, I am not uncooperative! Yes, I wanted to win, because I’ve been studying martial arts for years, it’s what my race, is, was, known for! And then you came, and I taught you! You’d only been doing it for a few weeks and already you had beat me!” You didn’t stutter, you were simply angry, “How do I feel? Did you even wonder? Oh! The humiliation! To know something I devoted my whole life too was a waste of time. I just wanted to be good at something for once, I just wanted to have something that defines me! Like you all do! Shiro, you’re ridiculously selfless, you’re a good leader! Keith is the emo, the serious one who can let loose when he needs too! Lance is the cocky one, the sharp-shooter, Pidge the smart one and Hunk the nice and great-cook one. Coran’s like the wise-one of the group, with all the proverbs and the unintentionally funny one. Allura is the bad-ass princess, everyone feels sorry for because her home was destroyed by the galra, because she and Coran are the only ones left. BUT GUESS WHAT! They destroyed my home too, and I’m the only ONE left, there’s no more of my species to go round, it’s just me! I thought you of all people would understand.” 

You looked at Shiro, a red mark in the form of your hand across his cheek. You were still crying and your knees almost gave way, if it weren’t for Shiro’s arms snaking around your waist. You buried you face into his chest, still crying. He placed his chin on your head, stroking your hair, “I didn’t know you felt like that, You should have told me, us.”

“I-I-I, Couldn’t,” You whispered, “I-I w-was s-so s-scared, i-is i-it b-bad I-I f-feel t-that w-way? I-Is i-it b-bad I-I w-want s-someone?”

“No,” Shiro whispered back, “No, It isn’t,” He turned around, steering you to your room before placing you in your bed, turning away, “Wait!” You said, and Shiro turned to face you, “Can you stay with me?” You asked.

“Yeah, I can, Y/N,” He smiled at you, as you moved up and he slipped in next to you, wrapping his arms around you, rubbing soothing circles on your back.

“I love you.”

“I love you too.

SEX!

Okay, now that I have your attention…

Sometimes I get anons asking me not to post anything NSFW.  Sometimes I get anons saying that they love my blog content with exception to the few NSFW posts, and therefore they cannot follow me.  And I’ve noticed this phenomenon where I lose 2-3 followers EVERY TIME I post something NSFW.  Here are my thoughts:

  1. First off, that is fine.  If NSFW offends you or you just don’t want to see it, that is absolutely 100% fine.  You don’t have to follow me.  You don’t have to follow me regardless of NSFW content!  It is your choice.
  2. I am an adult.  I may not act like it, but I am in my 20s.  And it is also my choice to post something NSFW.  It is my blog.  So please do not ask me to stop.  I respect your choice not to follow me, and you should respect my choice to post whatever content I’d like.
  3. There is a filtering option!  If you like my content but not my NSFW content, then you can filter it out!  It’s in under Settings –> Filtering.  I always tag my posts appropriately, so just filter out #NSFW.  Very easy!

Thank you for your attention.

4

The Eleventh Hour so far has my favorite storytelling from Griffin! So here’s a pseudo-movie poster ehuehueue

Had to do another illustration for our Fantasy Illust class and our prof gave me the go signal to draw TAZ again as long as I found good face refs for them. B^) I based Magnus, Taako and Merle on John Spainhour, Paul Boche, and Brian Cox respectively! 

2

she had the world || panic! at the disco

i only have two settings: 1. unconscious and 2. terrible
1. take pictures of your friends. take pictures with your friends. take as many pictures as you possibly can. even if they start to get annoyed with you, even if either of you feel “ugly” that day, even if you just took one the other day. because a day is going to come where all you’ll have is pictures and wishing you had more than what you’re left with hurts just as badly as losing them.

2. do the thing that scares you. do the thing that you’ve always wanted to do but have always been too scared to try. don’t force yourself if it doesn’t feel right but don’t be scared to try new things. as cheesy and cliche as it sounds, stepping out of your comfort zone, even for a moment, is worth it. regret is not.

3. it’s okay to hurt. if it hurts, that means it mattered.

4. sometimes, when something breaks, it cannot be fixed. there was nothing you could have done to make them change their mind, nothing you could have said to make them stay. the two of you broke apart, but that doesn’t mean you are broken.

5. heal, mourn, grieve. let yourself feel. don’t try to force the healing, it’ll come naturally, when it’s time.

6. there are going to be days when all you do is lay in bed, drink coffee, and refresh various social media apps. that’s okay. you’re allowed to rest, you’re allowed to do nothing. you don’t have to validate doing nothing.

7. you’re going to face a fear you didn’t even know you had. but you won’t have to face it alone.

8. don’t keep it all in your head. let the bad thoughts out to make room for the good ones.

9. whatever you think you did, whether it be in this life or a past life, to deserve suffering and pain does not exist. you don’t deserve to hurt. you don’t deserve to make yourself hurt. you don’t deserve to suffer. you don’t deserve to make yourself suffer.

10. you’re going to do things, you’re going to make decisions, you’re going to make yourself see things or read things that are going to hurt you. self harm isn’t limited to bruises or bleeding; you’re hurting yourself by caring about someone who doesn’t care about you anymore. that’s not to say that you should stop caring about them, but you should definitely stop checking their twitter account in the middle of the night.

11. you don’t need to look like anyone else to be a certain kind of person. you’re you and you are enough just the way you are.

12. get outside and lose yourself beneath the rays of the sun, escape to a place where it doesn’t hurt as badly as it does inside your house.

13. you’re gonna screw up, but that doesn’t make you a screw up.

14. it’s okay to set boundaries, it’s okay to distance yourself from others. it doesn’t make you a bad person, it doesn’t make you mean. it’s okay to put your own needs and wants above others. it doesn’t mean you don’t care, but you need to care about yourself first.

15. there was a person you thought you could never live without. and you will be without them. and you will still be alive.

16. you know what will make you feel worse, and you know what might make you feel slightly better – even if it doesn’t work 100%, it’s still better than doing the wrong thing. these choices are yours, so make the right one all of the time.

17. family isn’t always blood. sometimes, family can be the people who choose you and who keep on choosing you, not because they have to but because they want to. this isn’t a family you’re born into, but rather a family you find and create for yourself.

18. home isn’t four walls and a roof over your head, but rather someone that makes you feel safer than any building can.

19. happiness won’t always be so far and few.

20. never underestimate just how healing a car ride with your best friend can be.

21. you matter. you really do.

22. hope isn’t silly and though sometimes slippery, never stop clinging to it.

23. try taking your own advice from time to time. allow yourself to grieve, to be wounded, to cry, to hurt. allow yourself to heal. try to remember that one day, having all of this hope won’t have been for nothing and start promising yourself the things you promise others; that it’s going to be okay, genuinely and sincerely. because it’s the truth. you survived this year, you’ll survive the next.
—  23 things i learned at 23 // happy birthday to me
(cc, 2017)
Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes

by Stephen King
(reprinted in Sylvia K. Burack, ed. The Writer’s Handbook. Boston, MA: Writer, Inc., 1988: 3-9)

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn.  It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction.  But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.



II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do.  I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit.  In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction.  These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor’s approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.

He told me he needed a sports writer and we could “try each other out” if I wanted.

I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.

Gould nodded and said, “You’ll learn.”

I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.

I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he’d have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here’s an example:

(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King’s original copy)

Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as “Bullet” Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953….

(after edit marks)

Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon’s basketball team since 1953….

When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.

“I only took out the bad parts, you know,” he said. “Most of it’s pretty good.”

“I know,” I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. “I won’t do it again.”

“If that’s true,” he said, “you’ll never have to work again. You can do this for a living.” Then he threw back his head and laughed.

And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don’t expect ever to have to work again.



III. The Second Introduction

All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.

I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he’s talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould’s little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.

So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It’ll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away…if you listen.



IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1.  BE TALENTED
This, of course, is the killer.  What is talent?  I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with “what is the meaning of life?” for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness.  For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money.  If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.

Now some of you are really hollering.  Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep.  And some of you are calling me bad names.  Are you calling Harold Robbins talented?  someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching.  V.C. Andrews?  Theodore Dreiser?  Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?

Nonsense.  Worse than nonsense, off the subject.  We’re not talking about good or bad here.  I’m interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who’s good or bad.  As a rule the critical judgments come after the check’s been spent, anyway.  I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself.  People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have.  Ergo, they are communicating.  Ergo, they are talented.  The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn’t get paid.  If you’re not talented, you won’t succeed.  And if you’re not succeeding, you should know when to quit.

When is that?  I don’t know.  It’s different for each writer.  Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty.  But after six hundred?  Maybe.  After six thousand?  My friend, after six thousand pinks, it’s time you tried painting or computer programming.

Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters…maybe a commiserating phone call.  It’s lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices…unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement.  I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible.  If your eyes are open, you’ll know which way to go…or when to turn back.

2.  BE NEAT
Type.  Double-space.  Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff.  If you’ve marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3.  BE SELF-CRITICAL
If you haven’t marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job.  Only God gets things right the first time.  Don’t be a slob.

4.  REMOVE EVERY EXTRANEOUS WORD
You want to get up on a soapbox and preach?  Fine.  Get one and try your local park.  You want to write for money?  Get to the point.  And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can’t find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again…or try something new.

5.  NEVER LOOK AT A REFERENCE BOOK WHILE DOING A FIRST DRAFT You want to write a story?  Fine.  Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus.  Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket.  The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time.  Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.  There are no exceptions to this rule.  You think you might have misspelled a word?  O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later.  Why not?  Did you think it was going to go somewhere?  And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland?  You can check it…but laterWhen you sit down to write, write.  Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6.  KNOW THE MARKETS
Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall’s.  Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy…but people do it all the time.  I’m not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines.  If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion?  Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top?  If you like science fiction, read the magazines.  If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines.  And so on.  It isn’t just a matter of knowing what’s right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine’s entire slant.  Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7.  WRITE TO ENTERTAIN
Does this mean you can’t write “serious fiction”?  It does not.  Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap.  This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others.  But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around.  I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8.  ASK YOURSELF FREQUENTLY, AM I HAVING FUN?”
The answer needn’t always be yes.  But if it’s always no, it’s time for a new project or a new career.

9.  HOW TO EVALUATE CRITICISM
Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say.  Listen carefully to what they tell you.  Smile and nod a lot.  Then review what was said very carefully.  If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn’t work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet.  It doesn’t matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is.  If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I’d still suggest changing it.  But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10.  OBSERVE ALL RULES FOR PROPER SUBMISSION
Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11.  AN AGENT?  FORGET IT.  FOR NOW
Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients.  10% of nothing is nothing.  Agents also have to pay the rent.  Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life.  Flog your stories around yourself.  If you’ve done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete.  And remember Stephen King’s First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don’t need one until you’re making enough for someone to steal…and if you’re making that much, you’ll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12.  IF IT’S BAD, KILL IT
When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law.  When it comes to fiction, it is the law.



That’s everything you need to know.  And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want.  Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.

My ten minutes are up.

palewolfchild  asked:

How do you throw throwing knives properly?

well, first off you need a good throwing knife. knives are like people: most of them are good for one thing but not for others, like steve with throwing shields and steve with applying basic common sense. or like thor with electrocuting things and eating spicy foods. or clint with shooting arrows and basically any other facet of human life. 

anyway, a good throwing knife will be quite sharp on the point but blunted along the sides–sticks in the target but doesn’t cut your hands. the point and blade should be pretty thick, and the fewer perforations in the blade the better. throwing knives have to withstand a hard impact without breaking, so you want a decent quality knife, and the heavier it is (within limits) the less force you’ll need on your throw. 

you’ll want a good target to learn with, something big and soft enough that you’ll hit it and that your knife will embed so you know where you hit, but not so soft the knives fall out. deadpool may volunteer for this job. do not take him up on it. the commentary is not worth it.

grip the tip of the knife vertically between the pad of your thumb and the side of your index fingers. hold it firmly enough that it won’t slide in your grip but not too hard. 

stand with the foot on the side of your throwing hand pointed at your target, spine straight. start close to the target (another reason not to use deadpool–blood splatters farther than you think) and work your way back as you figure things out. the biggest part is learning to throw with enough force and rotation so the pointy end sticks in your target. it’ll take time, and there’s really no shortcut for just putting in the practice hours. 

if this does not work out for you, i recommend grenades for all your low-accuracy distance combat needs. 

I don't want to have children

“You say that now but wait till you have some!”

“You say that but watch you’ll end up with four!”

“What so you don’t like children?”

“Why do you hate children?”

“So you aren’t giving your parents any grandchildren?”

“Why are you so selfish?”

“Children are a blessing, how can you not see that?”

“Who will take care of you when you’re old?

"Haha, wait you aren’t kidding?”

“But you’d make such a good parent!”

Lame adaptations and sequels are always like, “how can Mina go back to her stifling Victorian marriage after her experience with the dark, seductive Dracula??”

Meanwhile, Mina marries her best friend, who she’s known since they were children, who she share common interests with, they build a home together, work as partners, make immense sacrifices for each other, support each other through their traumas.

Guys, a marriage isn’t stifling and restrictive just because two people… get along, I guess?