snow white and the seven dwarfs characters

Disney’s Leading Ladies Asks

Originally posted by chiaramiller

Fill up my askbox, anon or not, all are welcome! Does not have to be questions just from this list. Feel free to reblog for your use and add on other questions or characters I have forgotten.

Minnie Mouse: Are you currently crushing on someone?

Daisy Duck: Tell us your favorite accessories.

Snow White: Which one of the seven dwarfs do you most relate to? (Doc, Grumpy, Happy, Bashful, Sneezy, Sleepy, Dopey)

The Evil Queen: Mirror Mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all (in your opinion at least)?

Blue Fairy: When you wish upon a star, what do you wish for?

Cinderella: Tell us your perfect night out, no boundaries or limitations.

Anastasia and Drizella (Step Sisters): What is a talent you wish you had?

Lady Tremaine: If you could give up one chore for life, what would it be?

Alice: Everyone sometimes goes a little mad, in which ways do you see yourself as out of the box or different?

Wendy: What is something you’ve always wanted to do, but hesitated for some reason or another?

Tinker Bell: If you could fit in someone’s pocket for the day, whose pocket would you choose?

Lady: In what ways are you different from the traditions you were raised in?

Aurora (Sleeping Beauty): Are you a morning or a night person?

Maleficent: Do you enjoy sewing or what are some of your other favorite hobbies?

Cruella: Favorite animal print?

Perdita: Do you currently or ever want to have children?

Duchess: Cats or Dogs?

Marie: Do you have any siblings?

Princess Eilonwy: If you could forget a movie, TV show, or book in order to reexperience it for the first time, what would you pick?

Ariel: Favorite sea creature?

Ursula: Do you consider yourself an envious person?

Belle: What was the last book you read?

Jasmine: If a magic carpet could show you the world, where is the first place you would go?

Nala: If you had the opportunity to reconnect with an old significant other (or friendship) would you take it?

Pocahontas: What is your favorite outdoor activity?

Esmeralda: What traits or characteristics do you look for in a significant other?

Megara: Favorite Greek God, Goddess, or mythical creature?

Mulan: What is something worth fighting for?

Jane: Tell us a positive experience where you were forced outside of your comfort zone and caused you to grow.

Yzma: If you could morph into any animal for a day, which one would you choose?

Kida: What languages do you speak? Are there any you want to learn?

Lilo: Do you believe aliens exist?

Tiana: Favorite food to cook?

Rapunzel: What is your favorite thing about yourself?

Vanellope Von Schweetz: Favorite sweet treat?

Merida: Something you are afraid of?

Elsa: Favorite season?

Anna: Do you want to build a snowman?

Officer Hops: What is your dream job?

Dory: Just keep swimming… What is something that helps you make it through a difficult task?

Moana: Tell us about someone who has heavily influenced your life.

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Disney Fancast (1/?)

Cinderella ↦ Tove Agren

Prince Charming ↦ Benjamin Benedek

Mulan ↦ Zhu Zhu

Li Shang ↦ Ross Butler

Belle ↦ Sasha Kichingina

Prince Adam ↦ Timothee Bertoni

Anna ↦ Stacey Sexton

Kristoff ↦ Garret Hedlund

Snow White ↦ Adelaine Kane

Prince Florian ↦ Brandon Logie

Part 2: Task: 12 Days of lesser known animated show/film recommendations

Hey, guys! I’ve been a bit down lately, so in order to give myself something to do, I decided to share with you all the lesser known, underrated or entirely hidden gems of the animated world (as far as I know), be it show or film.

Rules:

-The animation must be traditional (no CGI unless it’s minor and in the background; i’ll do an all CGI list later).

-The recommended work must have soothing, inspiring or otherwise admirable leads with realistic emotional connections.

-The plot of the story must be intriguing if not wholly believable and the artwork must meet certain aesthetic standards.

-The characters must have emotionally realistic interactions with one another in ratio to the time allowed for them to interact.

-The animation in question may be from anywhere in the world.

Also, feel free to clue me in on any that I don’t list, because I would really appreciate a new animated find!  

As a matter of course, a great deal of the listed shows/films will be ‘anime’, simply because japanimation has the monopoly on the most unique and varied story lines, and Japan (and sometimes France) are the only ones making mostly traditionally drawn animated features still.

Alright, here we go … …

Day Two: Fairy Tale Films :)

The Day of the Crows

I absolutely adore this film. Not only is The Day of the Crows a superbly animated feast for the eyes, but the characters, lessons and honest interactions take it a level above most children’s films. Not only that, but the dialogue is wonderfully translated from the French to the English subtitles. As a matter of course, I prefer watching films in their original language unless the dub has some inventive dialogue or more adequate voice acting, but this little known gem isn’t likely to pick up a dub any time soon anyway, so all of you who only watch dubs should make an exception for this one. 

It is the story of a young boy who has been raised by an ogre in the woods, until one day he must leave the protection of the trees for the nearby village in order to save someone precious to him. While there, he meets a young girl and begins to learn the touching history of his family. It’s a delightfully nuanced film. Really, don’t miss it!

Note: The title is mildly misleading, as any crow characters are showcased near the end of the film and don’t get much screen time. But why should that bother anyone?

A+

Fusé: Teppō Musume no Torimonochō 

Is there any anime lover who would pass up a film with adorable characters and animal transformations? Well, I actually would pass up the ‘animal transformations’ part, but that may just be me. Fusé is a touching fairy tale centring around a young huntress who befriends a dog-like humanoid named Shino. What puts this movie a pitch above the other films out there with a similar premise is it’s refusal to give the characters more slack than any real person would get. People die…there’s a surprising amount of gore which I feel is somehow toned up despite the soft animation. It’s the sort of film that makes you laugh less because it’s funny and more because you know your window to find things humorous is rapidly disappearing. You want the characters to be happy….you think they should be because the film is so cute…but it’s the bitter-sweet trick of the story. 

It’s based on the Hakkenden, an old Japanese novel series that details the exploits of the ‘Dog Warriors’, beings reincarnated from the slaughtered spawn of a princess and her dog lover. This is part of why I can forgive the dog-creature theme, because the characters within the story on a few separate occasions refer to the story as a ‘counterfeit’ or parody of the Hakkenden

A

Snow Maiden

An old Russian animation about a young woman who is the child of Spring and Winter, stepping into a village for the first time and learning that she does not have the capacity to love as other humans do. It’s very touching, very whimsical, and in the end bitter-sweet. I’d recommend it for the beautiful artwork alone, but the characters are given a surprising amount of life considering how old the film is. It’s clearly a labour of love.

A+ 

The Dead Princess and the Seven Knights

An old Russian film based on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The most fantastic thing about this film is that from start to finish the entirety of the script is one looong poem, complete with rhymes. I believe this film, Snow Maiden and The Twelve Months are all apart of the same collection, but these three are not dubbed into English, like some of the better known in the series, such as The Snow Queen. 

A

The Twelve Months

If you are familiar with this film, it may be because you’ve watched the anime incarnation. I’d advise you to watch this one instead. Not only are the characters a bit more vital, but the art is a step above the anime and the humour is a bit more fluid. It is a Cinderella-like tale about a girl who wanders into the woods after being forced to preform an impossible task, and receives guidance from the Twelve Months, who are portrayed as a band of merry males of various ages having a meeting around a camp fire in the dead of winter.

A

Kirikou and the Sorceress

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a fascinating film about a young boy who, from the moment he is born, is able to talk and think like an adult. But he is still only a baby, and is very small because of it, which causes troubles between him and the towns people, and eventually gets the attention of a wicked sorceress that finds him a nuisance as he starts to use his size for unusual heroic feats. 

Every character is fun, the dialogue is insightful and the resolution is terribly sweet.

A+

Tales of the Night

A series of re-worked fairy tales told through ‘shadow puppet’ visuals. Beautiful stories, really. All of the interactions between the characters are unique and admirable, and every tale has a satisfying conclusion. You may think the shadow puppet look takes away from it, but, really, it only gives you a bit more emotion to savour since every character looks pretty much the same, allowing their intentions to nakedly drive the stories, rather than their looks.

A

The Last Unicorn

Based on the book of the same name, and with a screen play by the author, this film is one of the better known ‘hidden gems’. The story follows the ‘last unicorn’, as she searches for others of her kind, who are being held captive in a barren land that is very far away from her gentle forest. She gathers loyal and endearing companions along the way, and eventually looses a bit of herself in the throws of a pseudo-romance with a prince. 

It’s a classic. The animation is unique and whimsical, and the pacing, characters and eventual resolution are all wonderful. It was my favourite film as a child.

A+

The Princess and the Pilot

The Princess and the Pilot is a touching tale about the blooming tenderness and self-awareness between a pilot and the princess he is tasked with transporting across the ocean. There is political intrigue, bold decisions and the rude awakenings of reality in a war torn country. Both the leads are relatable and worth the care you inevitably develop toward them. And though the ending is a little frustrating, it is handled in a realistic and tentative manner that shows the meaning of personal feelings, even if physical circumstances can’t reflect them.

A-

Miss Hokusai

Miss Hokusai is the fictional and slightly sensationalised biography of an actual historical figure from the Japanese artistic past. The story is told in a series of self-contained artistic episodes that explore the philosophy needed to produce vital art, by teaching the characters emotional lessons through supernatural interactions. It’s very unique and telling, and every character has a degree of believably that is pleasantly attention grabbing. Some might complain that the formatting leaves a bit to be desired, but I’m pretty sure this is all intentional. 

A+

Princess Arete

Princess Arete is one of those rare princess films that is all about a princess and her character building, and not at all about romance. 

Little Princess Arete is kept in a tower where she grows increasingly depressed, despite her night time slips into the town bellow her window. By a bitter sort of luck, she is kidnapped by a wizard, and from here able to experience the world, albeit under a curse. The film has a very charmed and truthful grasp on the meanings in minor interactions and it never betrays the passionate heart of it’s female lead.

It’s a bit slow, but if you watch movies for the enrichment they provide and not for the face paced thrills, this one may be for you.

A+

Magic Boy

An old Japanese feature from the ‘60′s about a young boy who must do battle with a wicked witch to protect his home and family. The characters are enjoyable, the battles are pretty neat and the animation is a proto-perfect anime film suite. Honestly, if you’ve seen Kubo and the Two Strings and then you see this, you may feel, as I have, that it is like the spiritual grandfather to Kubo

A+

The Life of Guskou Budori

If you’ve ever seen Night on the Galactic Railroad, these two may look familiar to you. As you watch Guskou, you may develop the suspicion that the characters are an alternate incarnation or perhaps even a canon reincarnation of Giovanni and Campanella. 

The Life of Guskou Budori is about said titular character as he navigates life after the death (otherworldly kidnapping?) of his younger sister during a great famine. The animation is simply gorgeous, and if you can forgive the incredibly vague narrative, you may just find yourself walking along a very enchanted dream.

Like Galactic Railroad, all of the characters are anthropomorphised cats. I’m unsure why that is, but it’s cute and inventive. It too, is based on a book. If you haven’t seen Night on the Galactic Railroad, I would also recommend that one, as it is very touching and poetic, but it is very slow. If you happen to like both of them, the anime Spring and Chaos, another anthropomorphic cat tale, may be for you, as it is about the guy who wrote the two aforementioned stories.

B+

Tales from Earthsea

If you are a studio Ghibli fan, you may be in for a treat. This is a loose adaptation of Ursula K. LeGuin’s seminal work the Earthsea series. It wraps into one film the characters and issues of four books, and so it doesn’t do the books much justice as it has bit off a bit more than it can chew. But if you accept it as an entirely different story that happens to have similar magical rules and the same names as the Earthsea series character’s have, the film is quite good. 

Young Arren is a disturbed young man who runs away from his posh life and is picked up by the Arch-mage Ged. After making a special friend and fighting a deranged wizard, Arren learns how to own up to his fears and find peace despite his crimes. I recommend watching the original Japanese dub, as it is a bit more insightful about the Earthsea world.

It is directed by Miyazaki’s son Goro. If you like this film, you may like his other, more well rounded film From Up On Poppy Hill (my favourite Ghibli film), and Miyazaki’s Howl’s Moving Castle, which is an adaptation of Diana Wynne Jones’s book of the same name (and a far more skillfully crafted adaptation than Tales from Earthsea. The perks of being a seasoned animator, I guess).

If you like the films, or even if you don’t, I recommend reading the Earthsea series and the Howl’s Moving Castle series. I prefer the latter. 

A by itself, B-/C+ if compared to the books.

Fire and Ice

Fire and Ice is one of those barbarian films from the early 80′s. It’s got action and romance and wild prehistoric beasts, an obvious bad guy that’s still pretty well rounded despite his minor screen time and a bit of sorcery that you can laugh at if your mind is dirty enough to catch the innuendos. In a nutshell, Fire and Ice is a great late night blast from the past that every child of the 90′s should see at least once.

With art overseen by the legendary Frank Frazetta, I think any serious artist could find this film pretty rad as well. 

A-

The Cat Returns

The Cat Returns is a fascinating continuum of Shizuku’s story from Whisper of the Heart (another Ghibli film). It’s a fairy tale to the max, complete with a dapper cat ‘prince’ and woefully silly damsel-in-distress. It’s a lesser known Ghibli film, which is why it’s on the list, and if you do watch it, I recommend pairing it with Whisper of the Heart, a high school drama about a young girl’s blossoming romance and her attempt to write a novel, since it’s only right to see the little strings that connect the two tales. 

It’s funny, charming and the Baron has a British accent ;) Mmm-mm delish!

A+

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Whew! What a long list!

Next time: Best Comedy Supernatural animated shows/films.

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Here are all 12 pieces from my E! News exclusive illustration series!!!

I’m super happy with how each piece turned out and that each character has managed to stay themselves despite being thrown into new surroundings and costumes. (My inner feminist wouldn’t allow Merida or Mulan to have their weapons taken away lol) Pocahontas still loves animals, Cinderella is still dressing tiny creatures, Tiana is cooking, and Belle fell asleep reading!
I hope you enjoy the princesses you know and love, with a twist!

Check out my page for process work and phone backgrounds!

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Snow White and The Prince by disneylori

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Mickey’s Once Upon A Christmastime Parade by disneylori

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[Fairy Tale Characters, Hogwarts Style] Snow White Aesthetic

Snow White, were she a Gryffindor, would be considered the noblest one of all. The Evil Queen would pursue that title by making sure she was the rightful queen of the land, amassing wealth and marrying and/or disposing of any other rightful heirs to the throne. And yet it is the servant girl Snow White who is truly worthy of the title, for despite her quiet nature, her honor and courage is enough to rival an army’s. 

Snow White, were she a Hufflepuff, would be considered the fairest one of all. The Evil Queen, in all her vanity, would be perfectly bewildered and furious that her young stepdaughter, so plain and childish in her appearance, could be considered lovelier than her. But what really earns Snow White the loyalty of her people are her kind heart and her strong sense of justice, which makes her treat everyone she meets with dignity and respect.

Snow White, were she a Ravenclaw, would be considered the wisest one of all. The Evil Queen would be a perfectly brilliant genius, being talented in both magic and strategy, and would have been able to put the whole of the kingdom in the palm of her hand through politics and curses. Alas, the Queen is too arrogant to see that wisdom comes from no book – something our open-minded, artistic, thoughtful courtier Snow White knows purely on instinct.

Snow White, were she a Slytherin, would be considered the strongest one of all. The Evil Queen, threatened by the patriarchal system that demands she remarry upon her husband’s untimely death, asserts her strength by coldly eliminating anyone who gets in her way. She also takes to abusing her younger stepsister, Snow White; when she does, however, Snow White shows the true meaning of strength – that is, resilience, confidence, and resourcefulness.

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Snow White by Nay

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Hey so I’ve been wanting to do this for a few years now, but I’ve never had to chance to do it until now. I had made a “diversity chart” with Google Spreadsheet for the main Disney females. I hope you guys like it, I will be making one for Overwatch, Pixar, and the all of the Disney main characters too. I hope you guys find it interesting or w/e!!

EDIT: Updated the Skin Color and Origin pics

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Snow White and Dopey by disneylori

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‘A Dream Come True and a Career Curtailed:

The True-Life Fairy Tale of Adriana Caselotti, the Voice of Snow White’

by Brian Sibley, via Independent.co.uk

If the animated princess in the fairy tale represented a child-like innocence and naive goodness Adriana Caselotti - even well into her old age - still embodied those qualities. In our more cynical age, there were those who dismissed her as eccentric, or, worse, as plain batty. But she preserved and defended the image of the character she helped to create and took great joy in being loved for what was a unique contribution to cinema history.

She was 18 years old when Walt Disney embarked on a revolutionary project: the world’s first feature-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Not only had no one attempted such a film, but no one knew whether audiences would sit through a 90-minute “cartoon”. However, Disney believed that as long as his artists could create characters with believable personalities, the film would succeed.

The search for someone to speak and sing for Snow White began in 1934 when Disney’s casting director, Roy Scott, sought the advice of Guido Caselotti, a Los Angeles singing teacher. His younger daughter, Adriana, picked up the telephone extension while they were speaking and heard Scott asking her father if he knew of a little girl who could speak as a child and yet could sing operatic-style songs.

The eavesdropper immediately interrupted the conversation with a request that she might try out for the part, followed by a demonstration of her best coloratura trills. She was the first person to be auditioned for the role.

Since the part was intended for a 14-year-old, Adriana Caselotti knocked two years off her age and told Disney’s musical director, Frank Churchill, that she was only 16. When she sight-read Churchill’s song Someday My Prince Will Come, Walt Disney (who was listening behind a screen, so as to concentrate on the voice without being distracted by the singer’s appearance) felt sure that he had found his Snow White. That said, no fewer than 148 other hopefuls were auditioned!

It was a remarkable vocal performance: her singing was exquisite and her rendition of the dialogue was full of naivete, gentleness and compassion. She was paid $20 a day for her work on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and her total earnings for the film were just $970, although the film went on to earn millions of dollars for Disney. It was only when, uninvited, she managed to sneak into the film’s rapturously-received premiere, in December 1937, that she realized she had taken part in something that was destined for enduring fame. However, none of the actors who spoke for the characters was credited on the film.

For Adriana Caselotti, being Snow White was a once-in-a-lifetime job; in different circumstances it might have brought her great stardom. Jack Benny wanted her as a guest star on his radio show, but Disney vetoed the appearance, writing, “I’m sorry, but that voice can’t be used anywhere. I don’t want to spoil the illusion of Snow White.” And, whilst Caselotti always hoped that Disney would find her another screen role, he wisely knew that the voice of Snow White was unique and should never be used again. Her only other cinematic contribution, for which she was paid $100, was to sing the falsetto line “Wherefore Art Thou, Romeo", in the Tin Man’s song in The Wizard of Oz.

Later, Disney sent her on film-promotion tours, dressed as Snow White and accompanied by Pinto Colvig, who spoke for the dwarfs Sleepy and Grumpy. Adriana Caselotti confided to me that on one tour she and Colvig had a fling - the idea of a romance between Snow White and Grumpy is certainly an intriguing one.

In 1938, Caselotti and the actor who voiced Prince Charming unsuccessfully sued Disney and RCA (for $200,000 and $100,000, respectively) for a share of soundtrack-record profits. After this episode, though, she appeared to have been fairly loyal to Disney for the rest of her life.

Gracious and generous-hearted, Caselotti lived out the role of Snow White for the rest of her life: singing Whistle While You Work to strangers in the street, allowing herself to be photographed in the famous costume and permitting the public cataloging of her marriages to four Prince Charmings.

But despite making only one movie, Adriana Caselotti nevertheless secured for herself a kind of immortality. The last time I left her, she remarked that Snow White would never die; then, with a laugh, she added: “And when I’m in that coffin, d'you know what you’ll hear? Someday My Prince Will Come, because you see my voice will live for ever.”

Adriana Caselotti, actress: born in Bridgeport, Connecticut on May 6, 1916; died in Los Angeles January 18, 1997. R.I.P. Adriana!

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‘Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we are people.  So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong.  Write characters who are people.’

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A design I did for Snow White’s flower-picking dress. In the version DaVid and I are doing, this is what she would wear for the majority of the story.