snl writers night

SNL - Harry Styles Imagine

When you’d heard that Harry Styles was going to be on your show, it was all you could do not to scream out loud. You’d been a One Direction fan for years. Now days, however, you were less vocal about it.

You were young, and fond of comedy and writing, so being a comedy writer for SNL seemed perfect for you. You’d only been here for a little longer than four months, but you’d already become a favorite of the cast for your skits. You were by far one of the youngest writers on set.

When Lorne came to you and asked you to write the new “Celebrity Family Feud” episode you were considerably excited. Not only would you get to write an episode of one of your favorite parody skits, but you got to write a part for Harry Styles. It would be an under statement to say that you were excited.

“Wow, you look very nice today,” your coworker Kate McKinnon said with raised eyebrows.

“Thanks,” you said, pushing a strand of hair behind your ear.

“Any particular reason?” She asked, nudging you. She was one of your best friends on set so you thought you could trust her with your secret.

“Well, to be honest, I’m a big One Direction fan, I’m excited to see Harry,” You admitted sheepishly.

“Oh really,” Kate said mischievously. “Well he’s here I think.”

“He is!” You said nervously, you hadn’t been able to prepare yourself.

“Yeah, I’ll introduce you,” she was grinning with glee.

“Kate!” You tried to stop her.

“Hey Harry!” Kate called, and seemingly out of no where Harry Edward Styles began to saunter towards her. When Harry reached you, Kate had the grin of the Cheshire Cat.

“This is y/n, she’s a huge fan,” Kate said and simply walked off, leaving you alone with Harry. You felt your stomach lurch with nervousness.

“Hello y/n,” Harry said in his deep sultry voice.

“Hi,” you said, making sure you smiled, and didn’t look like a dying fish or something.

“I really like Sign of the Times,” you blurted. “I mean it’s just amazing, it really speaks to me about the state of the world. It’s so powerful and beautiful, and different from anything anyone else is doing, I just I wanted to let you know….I really like it…” you tapered off, feeling awkward all at once.

“Thanks,” Harry said, and he was genuinely smiling with gratefulness. “I was worried it wouldn’t work without the rest of the boy.”

“Don’t get me wrong, I love the boys, but this song is just monumental!” You said smiling.

“Wow, that’s really kind of you,” Harry smiled. Soon you were talking like you’d been old friends forever. It was wonderful, you couldn’t imagine a nicer person to talk with. He’s was so real, so genuine, there was nothing fake or showy about him.

Eventually, of course, everyone had to get to rehearsal, and you enjoyed watching Harry in the skit you’d written. As he was practicing, he turned to you, and winked. However, this action was not unnoticed by one cast member.

“Harry, stop flirting with Y/N!” Jimmy called jovially, and Harry blushed. You began to blush as well, but felt your heart swell happily. “You can use your Styles charm on her later,” Jimmy laughed.

In a little bit it was time for Harry to practice his song. You stood there in awe, as Harry’s powerful, ground breaking voice rang out. The words seemed to vibrate your heart.

When he finished, everyone applauded. You were so proud of Harry that you began to tear up a bit. You’d been there for his Xfactor days, and for the first album, through all the tours, and to know he’d gotten so far made you so happy.

As Harry sauntered over to you, you wiped your eyes quickly to hide your emotions. However, as he walked closer, seeing him made you well up all over again. Without thinking you threw your arms around him, hugging him tight.

“That was awesome,” you spoke into his shoulder.

“Thanks,” he mumbled back, seeming to be thankful for the hug. He was shaking a bit, he must’ve been nervous. You let him go, and stepped back, embarrassed at your outburst. However, when you looked up his eyes were sparkling, and he was looking at you gently.

“So you wanna get some coffee after this?” He asked abruptly.

You had to hold yourself back from saying, “who me?!” You were amazed to see your dreams coming true before your eyes.

“Yes definitely!” You exclaimed. “Here’s my number, just in case I’m doing something when you finish rehearsal,” you said excitedly, scrawling your number on a piece of paper.

“Awesome, thank you,” Harry said grinning at the paper you handed him.

“Y/n!” one of the other writers was calling you.

“I guess I have to go,” you said drearily.

“Alright, well I’ll see you later,” Harry winked and you smiled brightly at him before running off.

RICHARD BOETH
APRIL 29, 2017

The WGA’s master contract with Hollywood’s major studios is set to expire at midnight on Monday. If no new agreement is in place, striking writers could be marching with picket signs the next morning — instead of writing TV shows.

A writers strike would not mean that all television would suddenly be thrust into reruns. But some effects would be immediate, and a lengthy walkout could have a huge impact across the dial.

Late-night
Late-night, where writers’ rooms are open year-round, would be the first television sector affected. “The Tonight Show,” “The Late Show,” “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” “Conan,” and “The Daily Show” would go dark immediately — though they might not stay dark for long. David Letterman, whose Worldwide Pants production company owned “Late Show” and “Late Late Show” a decade ago — cut a separate deal with the WGA that allowed him and Craig Ferguson to return to the air during the 2007-08 strike with their writing staffs intact. But that’s not an option this time around as CBS has owned its late-night franchises since’s Letterman’s departure in 2015.

Letterman’s return to the airwaves on Jan. 2, 2008, forced competitors at NBC, ABC, and Comedy Central to follow suit, only without writers. Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien, Jimmy Kimmel, and Jon Stewart were forced to ad-lib their way through their shows. Jimmy Fallon, Stephen Colbert, James Corden, and, once again, Kimmel would face the same pressure to go back on the air amid an extended work stoppage — a challenging decision since all four hosts are also WGA members. “Saturday Night Live,” however, would be unlikely to air without writers on board. The NBC sketch comedy series would see its 42nd season come to a halt. “SNL” is scheduled to deliver three more originals this season, starting May 6 with Chris Pine as host.

Daytime
There are roughly half the number of daytime dramas on broadcast now as there were at the start of the 2007-08 strike. Another work stoppage would send the surviving soaps quickly off air, and likely be the death knell for some, if not all of them. Daytime soaps are expensive endeavors in perpetual production. Once those productions are stopped, and replaced with less expensive nonfiction programming, not restarting them becomes an easy choice to make. Daytime syndicated programming ranging from Ellen DeGeneres’ talk show to “Jeopardy” would also be affected, although those shows tend to bank episodes well in advance.

Award Shows
The 2007-08 strike turned the Golden Globes into a press conference with no stars in attendance. It also threatened, but ultimately left unscathed, the Academy Awards. The next major awards show this year is the Tony Awards, scheduled for June 7, set to be hosted by Kevin Spacey and air on CBS. But the newly rechristened MTV Movie and TV Awards, scheduled for May 7, would be the first live awards show to be impacted by a strike. Even if much of the writing for the show is already completed, stars would be unlikely to attend the show, as they would have to cross picket lines to do so.

Summer TV
In drama and comedy, cable and streaming shows whose writers rooms are up and running as well broadcast summer series will be affected by a strike that lasts more than a week or two. Writers rooms would be shut down and production halted shortly after completed scripts run out. Among the series currently in or heading into production that could be impacted are AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” FX’s “American Horror Story” and “You’re the Worst,” and broadcast dramas such as CBS’ new “Salvation.”

Fall TV
A strike that lasts only a few weeks or a month will have little effect on the traditional September to May broadcast season — unlike 2007, when the Nov. 5 start date of the strike shuttered writers rooms on shows that premiered in fall, with some shows never returning. But if a work stoppage extends into July or August, it will start to infringe on the seven to nine weeks of writer prep that broadcast series need before heading into production. That could mean orders for new and returning shows would end up shortened, and fall premiere dates could be pushed into later in the year.

Good short synopsis of what happens if the writers strike from Variety.