sniper rifle

A widowmaker sketchy painting i did………didnt turn out as good as i wanted it so i wont finish it properly. i dunno whom shes shooting at, just wanted her by the morning window. “original”, bra-less version is under the cut.

Keep reading

3

Mars Armory Corso

A custom bolt-action rifle built around the Remington 700 but chambered in .458 SOCOM. Normally this large caliber cartridge is seen in AR-15′s but a few bolt-action guns have been modified to use it. Note the AR magwell adapter that allows the Corso to use AR mags. The .458 SOCOM is not a long range bullet so it wouldn’t achieve any sort of meaningful ballistic advantage from a longer barrel. (GRH)

5

Springfield Armory M1C

Sniper variant of the M1 Garand, these rifles saw service in WWII up until the Vietnam War. The M1C is unique and much more sought after because the base M1 Garands were hand selected for accuracy before being fitted with a scope. The M1D on the other hand were built on stock rifles regardless if accuracy was excellent or average. Due to the way the Garand is loaded, the scope is offset to the left. This creates a parallax issue when sighting it in; most Garand sniper owners mention zeroing the rifle at 200 or 300 yards. (GRH)

2

Walther Gewehr 43 sniper rifle

Manufactured by Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik c.1943-45 - serial number 2753k.
7,92x57mm Mauser 10-round removable box magazine, can be fed with stripper clips, gas-operated semi-automatic fire, ZF4 scope.

Following in the steps of its American and Soviet predecessors, the G43 cements the look for future post-war battle rifles. Initially a much more complex design, the G41(W), it was simplified when Walther Waffenfabrik analyzed a captured Tokarev SVT-40 and decided to get rid of the silly gas-operated-phobic requirements of the German army.

serial number 5349f

7

Gunfighter History Pt 5CSR - Concealable Sniper Rifle
The M24 Remington Bolt Action Rifle has been the standard in accuracy and reliability for the US Army since 1998. Consistently delivering sub MOA performance on demand, the M24 is 43" overall length is very much, a traditional sniper rifle.

Today, more than half the world’s population lives in urban spaces. Drawn by economic opportunities, social connectivity, infrastructure and better standards of living, the useable landmass of these metro areas can only support so many people giving rise to a sprawl of smaller cities, suburbs and slums, often built directly adjacent to the primary area. Built specifically around zero fail missions in these settings, we needed a sniper rifle that was maneuverable and could be end user carries with a reduced signature.

At first, we explored gas guns. While making excellent battle rifles, a gas gun, no matter the tolerances, cannot predictably deliver the pronounced accuracy of a bolt gun.

From the ground up, the receiver on AR10 pattern rifles simply does not have the mass to retain a heavy contour precision barrel in a predictable position after it settles from a shot. Also, while tight chambers improved accuracy on manually fed bolt guns, in practice, they caused reliability issues when magazine fed by a gas or piston weapon system because, even 95% performance is not 100% of the time.

Built for the M118LR round, we started with the Surgeon 591 SA(Short Action) and a 16" 308 barrel. This “short” barrel would make the weapon system easier to maneuver and could be removed to further reduce the end user’s profile. The barrel could then replaced with zero effect to the ½ inch groups the CSR consistently delivered, thanks to the tolerances Surgeon used/uses in manufacturing their barrels.

Housing the Surgeon action and barrel, is a Remington Accessory Chassis System (RACS). Not only the lighter than other rifle chassis, it is one of the fastest to break down and set up, with only 3 bolts needed to remove the handguard. The free float handguard is modular, allowing user configuration to keep the weapon as light as possible and features wire channels and plugs to route and manage cables.

The RACS also features a skeletonized folding stock with adjustment in the recoil pad and cheek height to support a range of scopes with bells and objective lenses of varying size. Stock folded, it can be fit into a normal sized bag, something seen in every day life, and still be immediately accessible to the end user if the situation dictated. That put a 800 meter gun in a day pack. A capability unlike any other at that point in time.

Fully loaded, the CSR is about the size of a M4. It can be maneuvered quickly through doors, windows, alleys, ladders, and hallways without encumbering the end user. It can live alongside of a carbine in a vehicle, meaning it can go everywhere and be deployed at the same speed as a carbine.

Today, the CSR is employed by law enforcement and security professionals in the exact settings and mission it was designed for. It is second to none.

By Shawn Wiseman, Tyler Payne and Jon Chang

Supposed photo of at least one “Armagh Sniper”, nicknamed either “Goldfinger” or “Terminator”, armed with one of the dreaded Barrett M82 .50 caliber rifles that were smuggled into Ireland in 1986.

“What’s special about the Barrett is the huge kinetic energy… The bullet can just walk through a flak jacket. South Armagh was the prime place to use such weapon because of the availability of Brits. They came to dread it and that was part of its effectiveness.”  —Unidentified member of the South Armagh Brigade sniper teams

3

Alexander Arms Ulfberht

U.S made semi-auto rifle chambered in .338 Lapua Magnum. Although it looks like its patterned after an AR style rifle, the Ulfberht uses a Russian design for it’s operating system. Based on the Degtyaryov locking system found in the RPD and DP-28, the Ulfberht has two wings/flaps on its bolt carrier. The odd name is based on a legendary Viking sword, rather fitting since Alexander Arms is known to use Viking tales for naming some of their rifles and ammo. (GRH)