smedley butler

War is just a racket. A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of people. Only a small inside group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few at the expense of the masses.

I believe in adequate defense at the coastline and nothing else. If a nation comes over here to fight, then we’ll fight. The trouble with America is that when the dollar only earns 6 percent over here, then it gets restless and goes overseas to get 100 percent. Then the flag follows the dollar and the soldiers follow the flag.

I wouldn’t go to war again as I have done to protect some lousy investment of the bankers. There are only two things we should fight for. One is the defense of our homes and the other is the Bill of Rights. War for any other reason is simply a racket.

There isn’t a trick in the racketeering bag that the military gang is blind to. It has its “finger men” to point out enemies, its “muscle men” to destroy enemies, its “brain men” to plan war preparations, and a “Big Boss” Super-Nationalistic-Capitalism.

It may seem odd for me, a military man to adopt such a comparison. Truthfulness compels me to. I spent thirty- three years and four months in active military service as a member of this country’s most agile military force, the Marine Corps. I served in all commissioned ranks from Second Lieutenant to Major-General. And during that period, I spent most of my time being a high class muscle- man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the Bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism.

I suspected I was just part of a racket at the time. Now I am sure of it. Like all the members of the military profession, I never had a thought of my own until I left the service. My mental faculties remained in suspended animation while I obeyed the orders of higher-ups. This is typical with everyone in the military service.

I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912 (where have I heard that name before?). I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested.

During those years, I had, as the boys in the back room would say, a swell racket. Looking back on it, I feel that I could have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.

— 

Smedley Butler, Major General for the U.S Marine Corps on Interventionism 1940. During his career, he participated in military action in the Philippines, China, Central America and the Caribbean and in France, but soon turn into outspoken critic of the U.S wars and blew the whistle on the Business Plot, when he told a congressional committee that a group of wealthy industrialists were planning a military coup to overthrow Franklin D. Roosevelt, with Butler selected to lead a march of veterans to become dictator, similar to other Fascist regimes at that time. The individuals involved all denied the existence of a plot and the media ridiculed the allegations. A final report by a special House of Representatives Committeeconfirmed some of Butler’s testimony.

This quote is indeed relevant to the almost planned wars with Syria, Russia, Iran, Venezuela and the Ukraine. 

“I spent thirty-three years and four months in active military service as a member of this country’s most agile military force, the Marine Corps. I served in all commissioned ranks from Second Lieutenant to Major-General…

I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested…

Looking back on it, I feel I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three city districts. We Marines operated on three CONTINENTS…

War Is A Racket : I suspected I was just part of a racket at the time. Now I am sure of it. Like all members of the military profession I never had an original thought until I left the service. My mental faculties remained in suspended animation while I obeyed the orders of the higher- ups. This is typical with everyone in the military service…

The normal profits of a business concern in the United States are six, eight, ten, and sometimes twelve percent. But war-time profits - ah! that is another matter - twenty, sixty, one hundred, three hundred, and even eighteen hundred per cent - the sky is the limit…

The trouble with America is that when the dollar only earns 6 percent over here, then it gets restless and goes overseas to get 100 percent. Then the flag follows the dollar and the soldiers follow the flag…

[But] war like any other racket, pays high dividends to the very few. The cost of operations is always transferred to the people who do not profit…

Why don’t those damn oil companies fly their own flags on their personal property-maybe a flag with a gas pump on it?”

Major General Smedley Butler, US Marine Corps, Recipient of Medal of Honor, Marine Corps Brevet Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, and the highest decorated Marine in US history at the time of his death on June 21, 1940

In 1912 America sent troops into Nicaragua at the request of its president, Adolfo Diaz, who was about to be toppled by a revolt. President Taft sent in some troops, including a marine battalion led by Major Smedley Butler, who at the time played the war game at hardcore level due to a severe bout of malaria that gave him the nickname “Old Gimlet Eye”, on account of his feverish staring. His first task: to take back the country’s crucial railways and trains. Butler had just 354 men and a 104-degree fever going for him, but he would set forth trusting in the magical power of bullshit.

Whenever rebel troops challenged his men, Butler made them step back either by bullshitting his way through (this was probably helped by his death glare) or waving sandbags in the air and yelling: “Dynamite!” When he got near the rebels’ headquarters, he put wooden tent poles in the muzzles of their small field guns to make them look like 14-inch artillery cannons, and packed his marines in a tight, semicircular line so it would be impossible to see how many rows of soldiers there were (the real answer was “precisely one”).

When the rebels’ delegation arrived to see what was what, they found the illness-ridden Butler sitting on a makeshift throne, and threatening to crush them with his “superior numbers” and “big guns.” Their leader not only surrendered any claim to the railroads, but asked if the U.S. could smuggle him out of the country completely. Other American troops soon cleaned up the remaining rebel forces, then left a contingent force in the country as a friendly reminder that they could crush all opposition with a handful of men and two freaking tent poles.

The Result: The Panama Canal remained the only transoceanic route through Central America, and America’s biggest economic rivals were irrevocably screwed.

5 B.S. Rumors That Created The Modern World

An American Coup

In 1933, group of wealthy businessmen that allegedly included the heads of Chase Bank, GM, Goodyear, Standard Oil, the DuPont family and Senator Prescott Bush tried to recruit Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler to lead a military coup against President FDR and install a fascist dictatorship in the United States. And yes, we’re talking about the same Prescott Bush who fathered one US President and grandfathered another one.

A good rule of thumb: never trust a man named Smedley to run a hostile military coup for you. Besides being no fan of fascism, Smedley Butler was both a patriot - the most decorated Marine in U.S. history and winner of two Medal’s of Honor - and a vocal FDR supporter. Apparently none of these criminal masterminds noticed that their prospective point man had actively stumped for FDR in 1932.

Smedley spilled the beans to a congressional committee in 1934. Everyone he accused of being a conspirator vehemently denied it, and none of them were brought up on criminal charges. Still, the House McCormack-Dickstein Committee did at least confirm the existence of the conspiracy. As the committee’s official report reads: 

“In the last few weeks of the committee’s official life it received evidence showing that certain persons had made an attempt to establish a fascist organization in this country…There is no question that these attempts were discussed, were planned, and might have been placed in execution when and if the financial backers deemed it expedient.” 

Though many of the people who had allegedly backed the Business Plot also maintained financial ties with Nazi Germany up through America’s entry into World War II. But at least the United States never ended up becoming a fascist dictatorship (unless you ask Ron Paul supporters).

The lesson here? Fascist or not, you don’t fuck around with guys named Smedley.

Read the book “The Plot to Seize the White House” (Jules Archer) or Smedley’s own “War Is A Racket” in which he described the workings of the military-industrial complex and how it uses the American military for its private financial gain.

And people think America has actually changed.

For a little background, Smedley Butler is one of the most decorated Marines in history. He fought in a dozen different wars on 3 continents and won the Medal of Honor twice. The following quote is from his “War is a Racket” expose.

          “I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class thug for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902–1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.”

                                                     -Smedley Butler

La guerra es un fraude. Siempre lo ha sido.

Posiblemente sea el más viejo, fácimente el más rentable, sin duda el más vicioso. Es el único internacional en su alcance. Es el único en el que sus ganancias se cuentan en dólares y las pérdidas en vidas.

Un fraude es mejor descripto como, yo creo, algo que no es lo que parece a la mayoría de la gente. Solo un pequeño grupo sabe de qué se trata. Se realiza para el beneficio de unos pocos, a costa de muchos más. De la guerra, algunas personas amasan grandes fortunas.

—  U.S. Marine Major General Smedley D. Butler

anonymous asked:

Give me a reason or point me to a link on why not to join the military. I'm seriously thinking of joining.

You really need to ask yourself “why do I want to join the military?” 

It is out of a sense of “patriotism?” 

Ask yourself what and how you define patriotism. As yourself why that is something that should be important to you. Ask yourself if your moral views contradict that of what is thought of as patriotism. 

Ask yourself if you agree with the wars. Do you think a country should be bombing and killing innocent individuals? Do you think it is morally right to kill innocent civilians? 

Ask yourself how is the military funded? Do you think people should be robbed of their wealth to pay for things they don’t agree with? Do you think people should be robbed of their wealth even if they do agree with it? Shouldn’t individuals be free to voluntary contribute as they see worthy? 

Now ask yourself if you’d object to any orders that you thought were immoral. Would you risk yourself to be punished for philosophical reasons? 

If non of that helps, look up Smedley Butler’s speech “War is a Racket.” 

War Is a Racket

By Amy Goodman, Jul 27, 2011
“War is a racket,” wrote retired U.S. Marine Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler, in 1935. That statement, which is also the title of his short book on war profiteering, rings true today. One courageous civil servant just won a battle to hold war profiteers accountable. Her name is Bunnatine “Bunny” Greenhouse. She blew the whistle when her employer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, gave a no-bid $7 billion contract to the Halliburton subsidiary Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) as the invasion of Iraq was about to commence. She was doing her job, trying to ensure a competitive bidding process would save the U.S. government money. For that, she was forced out of her senior position, demoted and harassed.

Just this week, after waging a legal battle for more than half a decade, Bunny Greenhouse won. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers settled with Greenhouse for $970,000, representing full restitution for lost wages, compensatory damages and attorneys’ fees.

Her “offense” was to challenge a no-bid, $7 billion-plus contract to KBR. It was weeks before the expected invasion of Iraq, in 2003, and Bush military planners predicted Saddam Hussein would blow up Iraqi oilfields, as happened with the U.S. invasion in 1991. The project, dubbed “Restore Iraqi Oil,” or RIO, was created so that oilfield fires would be extinguished. KBR was owned then by Halliburton, whose CEO until 2000 was none other than then-Vice President Dick Cheney. KBR was the only company invited to bid.

Bunny Greenhouse told her superiors that the process was illegal. She was overridden. She said the decision to grant the contract to KBR came from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, run by VP Cheney’s close friend, Donald Rumsfeld.

As Bunny Greenhouse told a congressional committee, “I can unequivocally state that the abuse related to contracts awarded to KBR represents the most blatant and improper contract abuse I have witnessed during the course of my professional career.”

The oilfields were not set ablaze. Nevertheless, KBR was allowed to retool its $7 billion no-bid contract, to provide gasoline and other logistical support to the occupation forces. The contract was so-called cost-plus, which means KBR was not on the hook to provide services at a set price. Rather, it could charge its cost, plus a fixed percentage as profit. The more KBR charged, the more profit it made.

As the chief procurement officer, Greenhouse’s signature was required on all contracts valued at more than $10 million. Soon after testifying about the egregious RIO contract, she was demoted, stripped of her top-secret clearance and began receiving the lowest performance ratings. Before blowing the whistle, she had received the highest ratings. Ultimately, she left work, facing an unbearably hostile workplace.

After years of litigation, attorney Michael Kohn, president of the National Whistleblowers Center, brought the case to a settlement. He said: “Bunny Greenhouse risked her job and career when she objected to the gross waste of federal taxpayer dollars and illegal contracting practices at the Army Corps of Engineers. She had the courage to stand alone and challenge powerful special interests. She exposed a corrupt contracting environment where casual and clubby contracting practices were the norm. Her courage led to sweeping legal reforms that will forever halt the gross abuse she had the courage to expose.”

The National Whistleblowers Center’s executive director, Stephen Kohn (brother of Michael Kohn) told me: “Federal employees have a very, very hard time blowing the whistle. So whenever the government is forced to pay full damages for all back pay, all compensatory damages, all attorneys’ fees, that’s a major victory. I hope it’s a turning point. The case was hard-fought. It should never have had to been filed. Bunny did the right thing.”

According to Nobel Prize-winning economist Joe Stiglitz, the cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan alone will exceed $5 trillion. With a cost like this, why isn’t war central to the debate over the national debt?

Two-time Congressional Medal of Honor winner Maj. Gen. Smedley Butler had it right 75 years ago when he said of war: “It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious [racket]. … It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives … It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many.”

As President Barack Obama and Congress claim it is Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security that are breaking the budget, people should demand that they stop paying for war.

war is a racket

I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for theAmerican fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.

anonymous asked:

Have you read that book called "War is Racket"? I forgot the name of the author and havent' had a chance to read it yet. What do you think of it if you've read it?

Smedley Butler is the author.  He is one of the most decorated marines in the history of these United States.  If he didn’t write this book he would be far more well known, right up there with Patton. 

I think it should be “mandatory” reading for anyone who wants to join the military.  

It is absolutely fantastic.