slogan art

You guys really seemed to like the other comic I made, so here are a couple more ideas that didn’t make the cut.

And some Lotor in the spirit of new season 3 information!

Thank you guys for all your sweet words and compliments. I hope you enjoy these bonus scenes as much as you loved the original comic. GBFs (Gay Best Friends), Keith and Lance, appreciate it too.

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“Τα χαμόγελά μας ξίφη…και ακονίζονται από έρωτα”

“Our smiles swords and they are sharpened by love”

Πλατεία Ρομφέη (Κουλέ Καφέ), Άνω Πόλη.

Playboy: In terms of modern art, critical opinion is divided about the sincerity or deceitfulness, simplicity or complexity of contemporary abstract painting. What is your own opinion?

Nabokov: I do not see any essential difference between abstract and primitive art. Both are simple and sincere. Naturally, we should not generalize in these matters: It is the individual artist that counts. But if we accept for a moment the general notion of “modern art,” then we must admit that the trouble with it is that it is so commonplace, imitative and academic. Blurs and blotches have merely replaced the mass prettiness of a hundred years ago, pictures of Italian girls, handsome beggars, romantic ruins, and so forth. But just as among those corny oils there might occur the work of a true artist with a richer play of light and shade, with some original streak of violence or tenderness, so among the corn of primitive and abstract art one may come across a flash of great talent. Only talent interests me in paintings and books. Not general ideas, but the individual contribution.

Playboy: A contribution to society?

Nabokov: A work of art has no importance whatever to society. It is only important to the individual, and only the individual reader is important to me. I don’t give a damn for the group, the community, the masses, and so forth. Although I do not care for the slogan “art for art’s sake”—because unfortunately such promoters of it as, for instance, Oscar Wilde and various dainty poets, were in reality rank moralists and didacticists—there can be no question that what makes a work of fiction safe from larvae and rust is not its social importance but its art, only its art.