sloes

Black as Sloes

Originally posted by recked

Pairing: Ivar X (Mermaid)Reader

Word Count: 1400

Warnings: Poor Ivar, the water always trying to murder him

Anon requested:


Traveling across the ocean was without a doubt the worst part about England, why did it have to be so damn far away? Ivar ground his teeth in frustration. By all accounts he should be laying down, enjoying the still night. The lack of wind did him no favors in the long run but there wasn’t a cloud in the sky, only the full pale moon glittering off the smallest ripples. He should be like the rest of the men and women, sleeping. After his first voyage however, every little shift and sound and creak put him on edge, not to mention this uncomfortable feeling at the back of his neck of being watched.

Cleaning his nails with the very tip of his knife, he began to hum, starting out quiet as to not wake the others. As he felt slightly more and more calmed by it, he began singing the words, a deep hymn usually sung to keep formation, helping put him in any other place than on the ocean. Yet the feeling of being watched wouldn’t drift, instead it got stronger. Glancing around, no one stirred or seemed awake, but Ivar couldn’t shake the feeling. His volume drifted till it was back to a whisper, trying so hard to push away the feeling. 

“Beautiful.”

Ivar sat up straight, his back rigid as he searched for the voice. Behind him, he found you, this woman rested on the boats rim, smiling pleasantly. You were a vision so fine and so lavished in jewels and shells he scarcely believed what he was seeing was real. Ivar’s reason told him you needed to get out and on the boat as soon as possible, his instinct however, felt like he was staring down the jaws of a starving wolf.

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d3f4ult8  asked:

Quick question regarding all the Chocobros. Do you like each of them acting a certain way? I prefer my Iggy and Gladdy to be a Dom who has control of the entire situation, teasing me until I'm crying and begging. Then my Noct and Prompto to be sloe and gentle, having a fluffy afterglow.

It depends, I think! When I wrote Devour, I had more Dom Iggy and Gladio in mind, but during Focus and Record, Iggy was more leaning on the Sub spectrum. I feel like Noct always ends up controlling the situation or swaying it in his favor with my muse, while Prompto can be a wild card. 

Ultimately I think it depends on the circumstances of the setting, the mood and any traits that are partial to the scene you’re writing. 

In terms of preference? Definitely prefer a more Dom Iggy and Gladio, I’d probably butt-heads with Noctgar and Prompto? Hell, Prompto could just sweet talk me into signing my life away for all I care (I blame you, @xnoctits)

Common Prefixes for each clan

Thunderclan

Adder, Apple, Ash, Alder, Badger, Black, Bramble, Bracken, Briar, Copper, Dapple, Doe, Dove, Dust, Elk, Ember, Fern, Frost, Fire, Flame, Fox, Golden, Holly, Honey, Juniper, Lark, Leaf, Lion, Maple, Moss, Mouse, Oak, Owl, Pine, Poppy, Robin, Shrew, Squirrel, Sparrow, Stag, Storm, Sun, Thistle, Thorn, Thrush, Tiger, Vine, Wren

Riverclan

Aspen, Beetle, Blossom, Birch, Blue, Boulder, Brook, Clover, Creek, Dew, Duck, Eel, Feather, Fern, Fog, Flood, Flower, Frog, Goose, Gray, Ice, Lake, Lilac, Lily, Marsh, Mist, Minnow, Mint, Moss, Mud, Olive, Otter, Pebble, Petal, Pike, Reed, Shell, Silver, Splash, Stone, Storm, Stream, Trout, Turtle, Vole, Willow, Wet, Yellow

Windclan

Bee, Berry, Bird, Breeze, Bright, Brindle, Buzzard, Crow, Dawn, Dew, Dusk, Eagle, Falcon, Fawn, Fennel, Ferret, Ginger, Gorse, Grass, Hare, Hawk, Heather, Jay, Kestrel, Morning, Mole, Mouse, Mud, Oat, Pebble, Pigeon, Quail, Rabbit, Rain, Rock, Running, Rush, Rye, Sand, Seed, Sedge, Speckle, Stoat, Swift, Tansy, Thistle, Wasp, Wild, Weasel, Wheat, Yellow

Shadowclan

Ant, Apple, Ash, Bark, Bear, Beetle, Black, Bracken, Cedar, Cinder, Coal, Dapple, Dark, Dust, Dusk, Ember, Fern, Fire, Flame, Fly, Frog, Fox, Golden, Holly, Ivy, Lichen, Lizard, Log, Maple, Marsh, Moss, Moth, Nettle, Night, Owl, Poppy, Rat, Raven, Rowan, Russet, Shade, Sloe, Smoke, Snake, Soot, Speckle, Spider, Toad, Timber, Vine, Viper, Vole, Wolf, Yew

Skyclan

Acorn, Alder, Bark, Bay, Birch, Blossom, Briar, Bird, Buzzard, Boulder, Cedar, Cherry, Crow, Dapple, Dove, Elm, Falcon, Feather, Fly, Golden, Hawk, Hazel, Jay, Kestrel, Leaf, Maple, Moss, Nettle, Oak, Owl, Petal, Pine, Rowan, Sand, Seed, Sparrow, Spider, Squirrel, Starling, Tawny, Timber, Twig, Vine, Walnut, Yew, 

Send a flower fairy!!
  • Acorn Fairy: Favorite prank you've ever seen/done?
  • Almond Blossom Fairy: Something difficult you've done in order to succeed?
  • Apple Blossom Fairy: What would you like your future self to be like?
  • Beechnut Fairy: A prayer, rhyme, or saying that is special to you?
  • Bird's-Foot Trefoil Fairy: Strangest thing you've ever found?
  • Blackberry Fairy: Someone that you are envious of?
  • Blackthorn Fairy: A very difficult moment in your life?
  • BlueBell Fairy: A strange superstition that you have?
  • Bugle Fairy: Who would you protect no matter what?
  • Candytuft Fairy: Something that you're indifferent to? (don't really care about that everyone else makes a big fuss over)
  • Canterbury Bell Fairy: Your favorite song you like to sing when you're bored?
  • Cherrytree Fairy: Something you're very knowledgeable of?
  • Chicory Fairy: Something you love to do that keeps you energized?
  • Christmas Tree Fairy: Your favorite gift you have ever received
  • Columbine Fairy: What is your favorite comedy?
  • Daisy Fairy: Are you a morning person?
  • Double Daisy Fairy: What is something you're still unsure of?
  • Elderberry Fairy: One time you've helped solve a dispute?
  • Elm Tree Fairy: A place you've always wanted to see?
  • Forget-me-not Fairy: A special memory of love?
  • Fuchsia Fairy: A childhood wonder that you've always kept?
  • Gorse Fairy: What is something you're proud of?
  • Hawthorn Fairy: Something that gives you hope?
  • Heliotrope Fairy: A philosophy or religion you follow?
  • Holly Fairy: Ever had your future told?
  • Honeysuckle Fairy: Favorite song to dance to?
  • Jasmine Fairy: Your favorite item to decorate your house with?
  • Laburnum Fairy: What is your favorite musical instrument?
  • Lavender Fairy: Something that makes you wary?
  • Lilac Fairy: A moment that made you realize something amazing? Or world changing?
  • Lily of the Valley Fairy: A time you had to practice restraint?
  • Michaelmas Daisy Fairy: A regret you have?
  • Mountain Ash Fairy: Your favorite way to banish something from your life?
  • Mulberry Fairy: Something naughty/illegal you've always wanted to do?
  • Narcissus Fairy: Your favorite feature of yourself?
  • Nasturtium Fairy: Something you are proud of?
  • Nightshade Fairy: Someone you would never lie to?
  • Pear Blossom Fairy: what do you find the most fun to do?
  • Phlox Fairy: Something you wish you could do over again?
  • Pine Tree Fairy: What is the worst joke/trick anyone has played on you?
  • Poppy Fairy: Your most important victory?
  • Primrose Fairy: Favorite childhood memory?
  • Ragged Robin Fairy: What is your favorite dancing style?
  • Ragwort Fairy: where would you like to travel to?
  • Red Campion Fairy: What cheers you up when you're sad?
  • Red Clover Fairy: What is your dream job?
  • Rose Fairy: Someone you love the most and why?
  • Rosebay Willow-herb Fairy: Favorite pass-time?
  • Rose Hip Fairy: Favorite food?
  • Sloe Fairy: What do you think is hard to do?
  • Snowdrop Fairy: Favorite Season?
  • Speedwell Fairy: favorite color?
  • Stitchwort Fairy: Favorite constellation?
  • Strawberry Fairy: What is the thing you want the most?
  • Sweet Chestnut Fairy: What injustice angers you the most?
  • Sweet Pea Fairy: Pain or pleasure?
  • Traveller's Joy Fairy: Last vacation you had?
  • Tulip Fairy: What color are your eyes?
  • Wayfaring Tree Fairy: A journey you wish to take?
  • White Bindweed Fairy: the person/thing you can always depend on?
  • Wild Cherry Blossom Fairy: The best lie you've ever told?
  • Wild Rose Fairy: What are you afraid of?
  • Winter Jasmine Fairy: Someone that helps you often?
  • Yew Fairy: Something that makes you sad?

My dad is dying.

I don’t talk about it here anymore because I think up until recently I was completely in denial about it. However, after this weekend, and seeing him in the nursing home, unable to move, unable to care for himself, in a diaper…it just became very, very real and something I have to process and digest.

I thought I was okay with it. He has been sick for the last 13 years…so I always knew how serious I should have taken his health issues. It’s just this is my dad.

This is my pops.

This is the guy who taught me to play soccer and coached my team for 5 years. This is the guy who worked 4 jobs to put me through school and who literally is as sick as he is now because of how hard he worked for his family. This is the guy who taught me everything from sarcasm to how make a sloe gin fizz.

I thought I was ready and I don’t think I am.

The more thought I give it,  the more I’m convinced I never will be.

anonymous asked:

Hey, can I ask a favour? I'm writing a book, and I wonder if you can tell me some plants that would act as good poisons? Both fatal and not. And something that could be used in torture. (I promise this is for a book!) Thanks.

Ah, going Tory-hunting, are we? Good good. “For a book”, got it.

Okay! So, yes, is the answer. I don’t know how broadly you want to go into the World Of Plants, in terms of global distribution? But since you’re asking me, I’m guessing you want some UKvian/north west European answers. I also don’t know how historical you need me to be, so I’ll stick to natives where I can.

Also, it should be noted that pretty much any plant can kill you if you eat enough of it? But I’m assuming you want something a bit more ‘contained in a mysterious phial’ or ‘chopped into a soup’ rather than ‘six tonnes of common daisy, eat up, Your Majesty’.

Fatal Shit

The foxglove (Digitalis purpurea). Very pretty plant that loves hedges and forests and occasionally comes in white:

You know that scene in Casino Royale where Bond is poisoned and has to shoot himself up in his car to not die? That was digitalis, i.e. the active compound in these things. It fucks up your heart and that. In fact, the medicinal compound that has been scientifically extracted from digitalis - digoxin - is used in modern medicine, but straight from the plant is toxic.

It’s possible to simply really fuck someone up with these, but very easy to outright kill them, and a fine line to walk. It wouldn’t be easy to intentionally give them just a low dose. 

***

Deadly Nightshade, (Atropa belladonna). I like this one! In extremely low doses it’s a herb, actually, so there’s even narrative Plausible Deniability for it being in a kitchen/people getting overdosed.

This is it:

This, on the other hand, is not:

That’s Woody Nightshade, or Solarum dulcamara, which is also poisonous but rarely fatally so, and seems to be plastered throughout the internet on primarily USian sites labelled as Deadly Nightshade. 

Anyway. The berries and leaves are the deadly bits, and cause delirium and hallucinations. And, you know, death. This one is easier to control for effect than digitalis, mind, so you can poison or kill here. It’s also been used as a cosmetic, because it can make the pupils dilate, which as we all know, is the sexiest part of the human body.

It’s antidote is physostigmine, found naturally in the Calabar bean from Nigeria, although it is itself pretty poisonous. Or I think pilocarpine works, which is found in a South American plant, but I don’t know which.

***

The Yew Tree, (Taxus baccata). A particularly great entrant to any list, frankly. Love me a yew.

LOOK HOW BEAUTIFUL anyway, yew trees were worshipped by Celtic peoples as representing a Cult of Immortality, because they live for literally thousands of years. They are also almost entirely poisonous. Like… leaves, bark, wood seeds, everything. The only thing that isn’t, ironically, is the flesh of the berries, and as long as you didn’t chew - and therefore break - the seeds, they’d probably pass right through you and be fine. But as few as three seeds would poison you.

Also, most plants lose their toxins after pruning. Not yew. Cut branches are just as dangerous.

The fun bit is the symptoms, because most times, there aren’t any. You just die a few hours after eating. Some indigestion, like. That’s it. If there are, we’re looking at shaking, coldness, and falling over a lot. 

***

Hellebore (Helleborus spp). Pretty plants that flower in winter, so people like them.

The roots are toxic, causing wicked D and V and also death if you eat too much. People used to give them to kids to try to de-worm them, and a lot of kids died that way.

Interestingly, though, the seeds in particular cause skin problems after contact - burning and itching, usually. Potentially a good Clue for who the poisoner is, if their hands are all itchy and that.

***

Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea). So, in the Real World there are precious few examples of people being poisoned by ragwort, though plenty of it happening to horses; but that’s because we’re generally pretty careful with the stuff, and also it’s not fatal to most.

The exception is people with liver problems.

Someone with any sort of liver condition could be killed by this stuff, because at high enough levels it will cause complete liver failure. But, you’d have to either make them eat about 14lbs of the plant in one go (unlikely), or you’d have to make them drink it as a herbal tea over a long period (more likely). The toxins don’t accumulate in the body, but the liver damage does. It was for a while considered to be a cough remedy, too, so it’s a good one for plausible deniability.

Symptoms include lethargy, staggering, walking around like a zombie, and sometimes blindness.

***

Hemlock Water-Dropwort (Oenanthe crocata). Yeah, this is hemlock, Famous Poison of Antiquity. They killed many a Greek philosopher with this stuff. 

Great for plausible deniabilty - the full plant is almost identical to the fully-edible cow parsley, the stems can look like celery when chopped, and the roots look like wild parsnips. But, the toxins are quite unstable. Cooking can break them down - if not completely, then at least to survivable levels. But you’d still be sick as a dog from it, and you would need hospitalisation. 

Vomiting and nausea are the main symptoms, but convulsions and seizures are also up there. And, of course, death. There’s also some suggestion that it’s more potent in winter, and less so from April onwards? It’s unproven as of yet, but it is an interesting pattern in toxicity levels.

***

Non-Fatal

Lords and Ladies/Cuckoopint (Arum maculatum). It has approximately 8003 common names, this one, but Lords and Ladies is poetic, and cuckoopint is an old word meaning a cuckoo’s dick, so those are the ones I’ve included.

Some people apparently mistake it for wild garlic, since they grow in the same places and times? i don’t see it myself, but I’m told it’s a common mistake.

It is poisonous, but you’d have a job eating enough to kill yourself - it induces vomiting fast, and a prickly burning in the mouth even faster, so you wouldn’t be able to ingest more. This is true of both the leaves and the berries. So a good one to make someone ill, and they’d be sore for days, but very unlikely to kill someone.

***

Greater Celandine (Chelidonium majus). No relation to lesser celandine. Botany is wild.

Anyway, the juice in the stem is bright yellow and can cause nausea if ingested, and burning on the skin; historically, it was used to remove warts. But it tastes disgusting, as so many of these do, so it would have to be masked somehow. 

***

Spindle (Euonymous europaeus). Beautiful tree, five stars out of three.

Those are the berries! SO PRETTY but eating the berries will fuck you up nicely - D and V, heart palpitations, hallucinations and symptoms akin to meningitis. Unlikely to be fatal to a healthy person, mind. 

Again, though, tastes like arse.

***

‘Orrible Tortury Things

Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium). Nawr te. Here we get nasty.

This is hogweed. Tip to tip it can be about 6 feet of chlorophylled malice, but usually it’s around the four-to-five mark. The reason for it’s inclusion here lies in the sap, which contains, essentially, a compound that turns you into a fucking vampire.

How? you may be asking. Well - through a condition called phytophotodermatitis, which is where the sap basically strips out your skin’s ability to slather on the melanin and so the moment UV light hits the spot it burns. And I mean burns. Literal burns. Want to see a gross picture?

Yeah. And it’s not a one-off burn - you have to keep the skin out of the sun for a year or so before it stops reacting, even after the burn is healed. I work with people who have had hogweed burns (in my line of work it’s a professional hazard), and even mild ones will still suddenly show up again in the shower six months later.

It’s not as bad as one of our new Invasive Species, though - Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). That one burns. Google ‘giant hogweed burns’ for the grossest google session of your life. That causes literal third degree burns, and it’s a good six years before you’re back to normal. That’s only been about in UKvia for about 200 years, though.

In conclusion, you don’t fuck about with hogweed.

***

Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica). What list of Nast Plants would be complete without the humble stingy, eh?

We’ve all done our time with this bastard. Very common, touching the edges of the leaves produces a strong sting, a bit like mild bees. It’s entirely bearable, like, and actually, there are some people who whip their arthritic joints with nettles and report that it makes the swelling go down. But it’s not enjoyable, and being whipped with these would fucking hurt. Plus, it takes a while for the rash to fuck off.

It’s also highly nutritious and edible, though, and you can spin it into cloth. Non-stingy cloth, I might add. Go figure.

***

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa). A wonderful tree that gives us sloes which give us delicious sloe gin.

But it also has thorns. Now - professional tree knowledge coming in here - in fact, in the moment it hurts more to be bitten by a hawthorn. But, hawthorns will merely bite, and are non-venomous.

Blackthorns are venomous. As long as you clean the cuts and, crucially, don’t leave thorns in you, you’re fine. But if you leave a thorn in you, it will give you septicemia, which can be extremely nasty. Potentially fatal, actually, so possibly this could go further up the page? Dunno how you’d manage that, though.

***

Anyway, that’s all I can think of offhand. I hope this is useful knowledge for your “book”.

Study of Spirit: Styles of Gin.

To know gin is to know life. As a bartender it is very important to know your gins well, whether you are matching the right botanicals to go with the rest of the ingredients in the cocktail or suggesting the correct gin for a G&T. To help you understand the basics of gin I have made a list of different types you will come across.

Here are the different styles of lovely lovely Gin:

  • London Dry: The most popular from all the types. Named dry as it does not contain any sugar to make it sweet. Originally only made in London, but now can be made in any part of the world as long as it sticks to the rules. Mostly around 45% ABV, and characterized by citrus notes and aroma coming from the use of dried orange and lemon peels.
    Famous brands: Beefeater, Bombay, Tanqueray, Gordons, Broker’s.
  • Plymouth: England’s only protected gin with a geographical indication that can only be made in Plymouth, using water from Dartmoor. Known for his mere seven-botanical recipe it is a less drier gin with more earthy notes.
    Famous Brands: Well…. Plymouth.
  • Old Tom: The father of London dry this is a Victorian style gin from the 1800′s made the old way. Old Tom has a fuller body and is much sweeter. That is because during the Gin boom many bathtub gins didn’t have the best equipment to distill a clean gin. The final product had many impurities and imperfections that made the gin taste bad. The way to cover that was to add more botanicals and sugar to the spirit. This gin is used to make many classic cocktails such as the Martinez, Tom Collins, Gin Rickey.
    Famous Brands: Hayman’s, Ransom, Tanqueray Old Tom.
  • New Western/American (International): These are new gins on the market that focus on putting less emphasis on juniper and more emphasis on other aromatics.
    Famous Brands: Hendrick’s, Gin Mare, Aviation.
  • Sloe: Gin infused with sloe (blackthorn) drupes and sugar. It is more of a liqueur than a gin, holding up at around 25% ABV. Most commonly drank during christmas it has a berry sweetness to it.
    Famous Brands: Many famous brands have their own sloe gin for sale. Gordons, Plymouth, Sipsmith.
  • Genever: The great grand daddy of gin comes from the Netherlands. Genever otherwise known as Dutch gin is unlike any other gin you will taste. Made from malt grains, it gives it a darker color and flavor that is more similar to a light-bodied, botanical whiskey.
    Famous Brand: Bols Genever.

    Remember to drink responsibly! :)

    If you enjoyed this article share it with people and hit that like button! Also if you have any questions or want to share your thoughts please comment below. - UM. Thanks guys!

anonymous asked:

I'm so confused by the word "arándano". Some say it means blueberry, others say it means cranberry. Some say blueberry is "arándano azul" & others say cranberry is "arándano rojo" or "ágrio".. Wikipedia makes this same distinction, tho it seems to imply that arándano is blueberries by default. Then they say México says "mora azul". Someone said in Ecuador blueberries are "mortiños". I'm so puzzled? Is this a case of regionalisms? (Pls tag this under "frutas" or something so I can find ur reply!)

The problem is that arándano is the name of an entire species of plants. It more literally means “azalea berry” or “briar berry”, and it refers to different fruits. More specifically, the “aran” part of it is related to the Celtic word for “blackthorn” or “sloe” (in Spanish la endrina)  which are berry bushes. 

The arándano azul is “blueberry” but arándano is more specifically known as blueberry. The “cranberry” is also arándano but is sometimes known as arándano rojo “red arándano” or arándano agrio “sour arándano

Many fruits have different regionalisms, but la mora “blackberry” can also be “mulberry”, and so la mora is linked to purple [morado/a], so saying la mora azul means something like “blue-black berry”

It’s somewhat common for certain fruits and even vegetables to be related in name. It’s why you have things like “pineapple” or how French’s word for potato is “earth apple” literally. It’s that the word for something existed and then someone came along and found a new variety and said “that looks like this other thing we have” and then they shared the name.

For example, la uva is “grape” but you can get la pasa “raisin” from it, while la ciruela is “plum” you then get la ciruela pasa “prune” from it, which is saying “the plum that is treated like a raisin”. And similarly “currant” is known as la uva/pasa de Corinto also known as “raisins from Corinth”.

It’s also why sometimes the words for el limón “lemon” and la lima “lime” are sometimes swapped in certain places, where el limón technically is derived from the entire group of plants, which just happens to include both lemon and lime.

Or how la banana is sometimes el plátano even though they’re technically different and prepared differently, a “banana” is still sometimes regarded as “plantain”.

When they can get away with it, some fruits are named after certain regions where you find them; la mandarina “Mandarin orange”, el damasco “apricot (Latin America)”, la sandía “watermelon [Sindh, Pakistan]”…they sort of work almost like wines in that sense.

These traits also sometimes show up in vegetables and spices; el pimiento is “a pepper (plant)” but la pimienta is “pepper (spice)” or “peppercorn”, while la pimienta roja or la pimienta cayena is “cayenne pepper / red pepper”, and then la pimienta de Jamaica is “allspice” aka “Jamaica pepper” or sometimes la pimienta inglesa “English pepper” considering Jamaica was a British colony.


It’s usually a case of regionalisms. Just know that el arándano is most typically “blueberry” but it’s specified in a place where el arándano rojo “cranberry” would be more common.

The most well-known fruits are known usually universally… la manzana, la naranja, la cereza, la uva, el coco, la sandía… Probably the least controversial fruit is la naranja “orange” because even if you’re saying la mandarina, the color naranja or anaranjado/a still exist 

If you’re lucky the regionalisms are very noticeable; el albaricoque “apricot (Spain)” and el damasco “apricot (Latin America)” and then el chabacano “apricot (Mexico)”

It’s mostly regionalisms and a lot of it is weird and specific, but you do see some of it in English even… “Japanese eggplant” or “English cucumber” or “Italian parsley”… or the confusion between “yam” and “sweet potato”. 

It’s all weird and it’s usually one regionalism meets another regionalism for the same thing or the same concept and then you have two different words that are equally valid and some are equally popular. 

TLDR; If it’s ever in doubt, I’d say specify with el arándano azul but most people are going to realize it’s some kind of small berry if you say arándano so you’re able to at least give them the basic idea.

youtube

Eight years ago, Vienna Teng wrote this song after attending a Barack Obama rally. To be wrenched from your own cynicism felt a little like falling in love, she found.

This day, eight years ago, even the cold seemed bracing at ten below freezing. Aretha Franklin wore her hat. Nostalgia glasses are always rose-tinted, but some days are just better than others– and that day was one of the best. I was a lot younger, and I was afraid of a lot less. It felt like you could do anything.

So what I’m telling myself today is to never forget that feeling: to stay raw in the upcoming years, to stay malcontent, and to keep the creeping cynicism from crusting us over again. Let the last eight years have changed you for the better. Don’t settle.

flickr

A very late harvest by Thomas T.
Via Flickr:
Some blackthorn sloes have survived until Christmas.