sli

The benchmarks for Wolfie’s new computer, gonna need a jackhammer to get him out of his chair. 

I decided I’d work on building a new one for me. I’m up to $6k, 2 Titan X in SLI isn’t too much for graphics is it? *smirkle* I may need to reconsider a few options… lol

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Fairy Lights in Femtoseconds

Laser technology developed by the Digital Nature Group have developed a small floating hologram which could be used for volumetric graphics or interfaces:

We present a method of rendering aerial and volumetric graphics using femtosecond lasers. A high-intensity laser excites a physical matter to emit light at an arbitrary 3D position. Popular applications can then be explored especially since plasma induced by a femtosecond laser is safer than that generated by a nanosecond laser. There are two methods of rendering graphics with a femtosecond laser in air: Producing holograms using spatial light modulation technology, and scanning of a laser beam by a galvano mirror. The holograms and workspace of the system proposed here occupy a volume of up to 1 cm^3; however, this size is scalable depending on the optical devices and their setup. 

More Here

Street Light Interference

Street light interference, or SLI is an alleged anomalous phenomenon where a person seems to turn off (or sometimes on) street lights, or outside building security lights, when passing near them.

Although street lights can turn off by chance, such as high pressure sodium street lights cycling (turning on and off repeatedly) at the end of their life cycle, believers in street light interference tend to claim that it happens to them personally on a regular basis, more frequently than chance would explain. Some propose paranormal explanations for SLI, sometimes based on scientific terminology, such as the explanation that electrical impulses in their brain interfere with the workings of electric lights. Anecdotes about people’s experiences of SLI have been reported by news sources.

SLI has never been demonstrated to occur in a scientific experiment, and those who claim to cause it have been found to be unable to reproduce the effect on demand; they give the explanation that the effect is not within their mental and physical control. Many times they do report, however, that it occurs with specific lamps and not just randomly shutting off street lights or electrical lamps in general.

Inside the second: A new look at game benchmarking

I suppose it all started with a brief conversation. Last fall, I was having dinner with Ramsom Koay, the PR rep from Thermaltake. He’s an inquisitive guy, and he wanted to know the answer to what seemed like a simple question: why does anyone need a faster video card, so long as a relatively cheap one will produce 30 frames per second? And what’s the deal with more FPS, anyway? Who needs it?

I’m ostensibly the expert in such things, but honestly, I wasn’t prepared for such a question right at that moment. Caught off guard, I took a second to think it through and gave my best answer. I think it was a good one, as these things go, with some talk about avoiding slowdowns and maintaining a consistent illusion of motion. But I realized something jarring as I was giving it—that the results we provide our readers in our video card reviews don’t really address the issues I’d just identified very well.

from The Tech Report

This extensive and excellent look at graphics performance benchmarking is very interesting to read, especially for those of you who are into gaming and reading reviews.  I will note that it is pretty extensive with tons of graphs to work through.  Hit the source above to see the whole article.