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mythology meme | Slavic gods & goddesses - Evening Star

In Slavic mythology, the Zorya are the two guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras or as the Morning Star and the Evening Star. Both sisters serve the sun god Dažbog, who is in some myths described as their father. The Morning Star opens the gates to his palace each morning for the sun-chariot’s departure. At dusk, the Evening Star closes the gates once more after his return.They guard and watch over the doomsday hound, Simargl, who is chained to the star Polaris in the constellation Ursa Minor, the “little bear”. If the chain ever breaks, the hound will devour the constellation and the universe will end. 

The Evening Star is Zorya Vechernyaya (from Russian vecher, meaning “evening”), a goddess of dusk who is depicted as a fully armed and courageous warrior. She was associated with the planet Mercury. Some myths cast both Zorya as virgin goddesses who had the specific job of grooming their father’s white horses, but other accounts say they married the moon god Myesyats and gave birth to the stars. Ancient Slavs would pray to Zorya Vechernyaya each evening as the sun set.

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mythological characters meme: Ivan Tsarevich

Ivan Tsarevich (Ива́н Царе́вич or Иван-царевич) is one of the main heroes of Russian folklore, usually a protagonist, often engaged in a struggle with Koschei. Along with Ivan the Fool, Ivan Tsarevich is a placeholder name rather than a certain character.

He is often, but not always, the youngest son of three. In the tale The Three Tsardoms, he is a son of Nastasya the Golden Braid. Different legends describe Ivan as having various wives, including Yelena the Beautiful, Vasilisa the Wise and Marya Morevna. [x]

Viktor Vasnetsov, Ivan Tsarevich Riding the Grey Wolf. Oil on canvas, 1889. Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia.

THOSE WHO HAUNT THE EARTH: RUSALKA

According to Slavic folklore, a rusalka is the spirit of a young women who was murdered in or close to a lake or river. They appear as beautiful young women with bright green eyes who try to lure men and children into the water, where they will drown them. Their shrill laughter is known to be deadly to humans. A rusalka can leave the water at night to sing in trees or join other rusalki to dance in the local meadows, but she cannot live long on dry land. However, rusalki are kept safe with magical combs, which give them the power to conjure water when they need it. According to some legends, should a rusalka’s hair dry out, she will die. A rusalka’s fate can also be undone by avenging her death.

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mythology meme | Slavic gods & goddesses - Morning Star

In Slavic mythology, the Zorya are the two guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras or as the Morning Star and the Evening Star. Both sisters serve the sun god Dažbog, who is in some myths described as their father. The Morning Star opens the gates to his palace each morning for the sun-chariot’s departure. At dusk, the Evening Star closes the gates once more after his return.They guard and watch over the doomsday hound, Simargl, who is chained to the star Polaris in the constellation Ursa Minor, the “little bear”. If the chain ever breaks, the hound will devour the constellation and the universe will end. 

The Morning Star is Zorya Utrennyaya (from Russian utro, meaning “morning”), a goddess of dawn who is depicted as a fully armed and courageous warrior. As the wife of Perun, Zorya Utrennyaya accompanies her husband when he rides out to do battle, and amid the fray lets down her veil to protect those warriors she favors and save them from death. She is a patroness of horses, protection, exorcism, and the planet Venus. Ancient Slavs would pray to her each morning as the sun rose. 

Baba Yaga 

Baba Yaga hails from the place where fear and wisdom meet, she straddles the gap between life and death and holds the secret to both.

Also known as Jezda or Jazi Baba, Baba Yaga is an old witch who lives in the forests of Eastern Europe. It is said that her teeth, nose, and breasts made of iron and that her hair is made snakes. She moves through the forest using a mortar and pestle. Her house sits upon chicken legs which allows it to spin around and move. Her fence is made out of the bones of people who have displeased her. Baba Yaga is a very complex women who is thought to be the personification of death as well as having dominion over fertility, fate and nature. She has the gift of prophecy and can impart great wisdom.  If you wish to benefit from the gifts of Baba Yaga you must undertake an arduous journey to her house and then you must survive the tasks Baba Yaga puts forth to test you. 

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mythology meme | Slavic legendary creatures - Sirin

Sirin or the Bird of Sorrow is a magnificent but cruel bird-maiden of Russian legends. Her body of a giant bird of prey is covered in thousand midnight-coloured feathers and a set of sharp claws, big enough to crush a horse. From the chest up, she’s of human appearance and her sinister face of a beautiful woman is adorned by a golden crown or nimbus. Sirin lays her precious eggs on distant seashores before casting them into the waves. When the eggs hatch, a thunderstorm sets over the oceans till they become so rough that no soul can travel across.

She is a death-bringer. Her honey-tongued singing voice stupefies mortals, making them forget everything they had ever known in this world and announces their imminent death. People would attempt to save themselves from Sirin by shooting cannons, ringing bells and covering their ears but to no avail. Her terrifying smirk is the last thing they see before she plunges down at them with her claws and carries them away to the realm of death called Nav where she forever resides with her brighter counterpart Alkonost, her beloved sister otherwise known as the Bird of Joy.

RUSALKA

[noun]

Slavic mythology: (plural: rusalki or rusalky) a female ghost, water nymph, succubus, or mermaid-like demon that dwelt in a waterway. According to most traditions, the rusalki were fish-women, who lived at the bottom of rivers. In the middle of the night, they would walk out to the bank and dance in meadows. If they saw handsome men, they would fascinate them with songs and dancing, mesmerise them, then lead them away to the river floor to their death.

[Matthew DeMino]

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Rodzanice / Narecznice / Rojenice / Sudice / Sudičky / Suđaje are the “Fates” from the Slavic mythology, often depicted as three sisters. They share many similarities with the Greek myth of the Moirai.

Rodzanice were caring for the pregnant women, protecting them from the evil forces, and appearing at the newborns’ cradles to designate their fate. They were approaching the household at the midnight, 3 days after the child’s birth, and as the visit was meant to designate the child’s destiny, the household was carefully tidied up and prepared to welcome the sisters of Fate. A feast was thrown, food was given generously to every guest who appeared at that night and the child was dressed in white linen clothes, symbolizing purity. Rodzanice were also appearing at every important event of the human life, such as the first haircut (when the child’s cut hair was offered to them) or the wedding, when they were also given offerings to ensure the continuity of the good fortune. Similar to the Moirai, one of them was believed to cut the ‘life-thread’ when the human’s fate was going to end.

After the process of Christinization they were replaced by the notion of the caring/protecting/observing angels.

[gifs from: “Słowiańska krew”]

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mythology meme | Slavic spirits & demons - lesovikha

Lesovikha is the female version and sometimes a companion of leshy, a magical protector of woodlands. The spirit’s true appearance is ambigious as she’s a shape-shifter and while some mortals describe her as a naked young girl as tall as a tree with green eyes and long shaggy hair or note that her body cast no shadow, others claim they’ve encountered her in the shape of a tiny raindrop. Lesovikha plays an important role in Slavic forest lore. She is a trickster who finds great joy in leading lone travellers astray, especially if they were caught making a fire in her forest sanctuary. Angered, she then follows these lost souls to ask what they desire most: fortune or a good life. If the travellers choose money, lesovikha rewards them with golden coins that turn into coals the moment they set foot outside her woodland realm. Hovewer, if they wish for a good life lesovikha honours her promise and the mortals enjoy success in all their endevours.

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Slavic Mythology - Rusalka

Rusalkain Slavic mythology, is the lake-dwelling soul of a child who died unbaptized or of a virgin who drowned. They appear in different forms depending on the region in which they dwell. Around the Danube River, where they are called vila, rusalki are beautiful, charming girls, dressed always in light robes of mist, singing sweet, bewitching songs to the passersby. The rusalki of northern Russia are ugly, unkempt, wicked, invariably naked, and always eager to ambush humans. All rusalki love to entice men—the vile to enchant them and the northern rusalki to torture them.

Wilis, or Vilas, are vengeful Slavic witch-spirits; in life they were maidens deceived by lovers and died before their weddings. In death, they haunt the forest from midnight to dawn each night, forcing any man who wanders into their path to dance until he dies of exhaustion. Russian Vilas, like Valkyries, had charge of the rites of death and the guiding of souls. They came to be feared as the angry, dangerous souls of drowned women, who drew into the waters any heedless wayfarer who happened to see them dance by moonlight. (x)