ski-season

Perseid, Aurora, and Noctilucent Clouds : Night skies over northern Sweden can hold some tantalizing sights in August. Gazing toward the Big Dipper, this beautiful skyscape captures three of them in a single frame taken last August 12/13. Though receding from northern skies for the season, night shining or noctilucent clouds are hanging just above the horizon. Extreme altitude icy condensations on meteoric dust, they were caught here just below an early apparition of a lovely green auroral band, also shining near the edge of space. The flash of a Perseid meteor near the peak of the annual shower punctuates the scene. In fact, this years Perseid shower will peak in the coming days, offering a continuing chance for a night sky photographers hat trick. via NASA

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A Summer Photo Essay

(Written by Sam Cox - November 8, 2014)

During the summer months, most skiers invest significant time and energy ensuring they’re setup with maximum free time and ample funds for the upcoming winter.  In order to accomplish this, strategies vary across a broad spectrum of employment opportunities: commercial fishing, construction, wildland firefighting, guiding and landscaping to name a few.  For the last 16 years, the Forest Service has been my chosen path during the off season.  Spending time outside, having the opportunity to travel and working with quality individuals keeps me coming back each summer.  Fire season is a fickle thing though, it’s highly influenced by the weather and you never know exactly what you’re going to get.  I stopped and snapped a few iPhone pics along the way this season, and put together a short photo essay of my personal take on how to spend the summer setting myself up for success this winter. 

2016-17 Ski Jumping Season - Summary! (very long post)

World Cup

Winner: Stefan Kraft

Most first places: Stefan Kraft (8)

Most second places: Andreas Wellinger (8)

Most third places: Stefan Kraft (6)

All jumpers: 140

Jumpers with points: 73

The best jumper without a single podium: Vincent Descombes Sevoie (16 place)

The worst player with at least one podium: Andreas Kofler (23 place)

All leaders:

1. Domen Prevc (25.11.2016, Kuusamo - 26.11.2016, Kuusamo) - 1 competition

2. Severin Freund (26.11.2016, Kuusamo - 4.12.2016, Klingenthal) - 1

3. Domen Prevc (4.12.2016, Klingenthal - 4.01.2017, Innsbruck) - 7

4. Daniel Andre Tande (4.01.2017, Innsbruck - 6.01.2017, Bischofshofen) - 1

5. Domen Prevc (6.01.2017, Bischofshofen - 14.01.2017, Wisła) - 1

6. Kamil Stoch (14.01.2017, Wisła - 12.03.2017, Oslo) - 10

7. Stefan Kraft (12.03.2017, Oslo - World Cup winner) - 5

Podium classification (1st-2nd-3rd):

1. Stefan Kraft (8-3-6)
2. Kamil Stoch (7-3-2)
3. Domen Prevc (4-1-1)
4. Daniel Andre Tande (2-4-0)
5. Maciej Kot (2-1-0)
6. Andreas Wellinger (1-8-3)
7. Michael Hayböck (1-1-2)
8. Severin Freund (1-1-0)
9. Peter Prevc (1-0-1)
10. Noriaki Kasai (0-1-1)
11. Robert Johansson (0-1-0)
11. Andreas Stjernen (0-1-0)
13. Markus Eisenbichler (0-0-3)
14. Manuel Fettner (0-0-2)
15. Richard Freitag (0-0-1)
15. Evgeniy Klimov (0-0-1)
15. Andreas Kofler (0-0-1)
15. Jurij Tepes (0-0-1)
15. Piotr Żyła (0-0-1)

Best competitions for nations without any individual podiums:

Bulgaria: Wladimir Zografski - 47 place in Sapporo
Czech Republic: Roman Koudelka - 5 place in Sapporo
Estonia: Kaarel Nurmsalu - 30 place in Obertsdorf and PyeongChang
Finland: Jarko Määttä - 14 place in Innsbruck
France: Vincent Descombes Sevoie - 5 place in Kuusamo
Canada: MacKenzie Boyd-Clowes - 12 place in Klingenthal
Kazakhstan: Marat Zhaparov - 44 place in Wisla
South Korea: Kim Hyun-ki - 44 place in PyeongChang
United States: Kevin Bickner - 15 place in Vikersund
Switzerland: Simon Ammann - 11 place in Sapporo
Italy: Sebastian Colloredo - 9 place in Innsbruck

Nations Cup

1. Poland - 5833 points (3733 individual + 2100 in teams)

2. Austria - 5586 points (3736 individual + 1850 in teams)

3. Germany - 5513 points (3563 individual + 1950 in teams)

Team competitions podiums:

3.12.2016, Klingenthal:

1. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Kamil Stoch, 3. Dawid Kubacki, 4. Maciej Kot)

2. Germany (1. Markus Eisenbichler, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Richard Freitag, 4. Severin Freund)

3. Austria (1. Michael Hayböck, 2. Stefan Kraft, 3. Andreas Kofler, 4. Manuel Fettner)

21.01.2017, Zakopane:

1. Germany (1. Markus Eisenbichler, .2 Stephan Leyhe, 3. Andreas Wellinger, 4. Richard Freitag)

2. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Maciej Kot, 3. Dawid Kubacki, 4 Kamil Stoch)

3. Slovenia (1. Jurij Tepes, 2. Peter Prevc, 3. Jernej Damjan, 4. Domen Prevc)

28.01.2017, Willingen:

1. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Maciej Kot, 3. Dawid Kubacki, 4 Kamil Stoch)

2. Austria (1. Michael Hayböck, 2. Manuel Fettner, 3. Gregor Schlierenzauer, 4. Stefan Kraft)

3. Germany (1. Markus Eisenbichler, .2 Stephan Leyhe, 3. Andreas Wellinger, 4. Richard Freitag)

11.03.2017, Oslo

1. Austria (1. Michael Hayböck, 2. Manuel Fettner, 3. Markus Schiffner, 4. Stefan Kraft)

2. Germany (1. Markus Eisenbichler, .2 Stephan Leyhe, 3. Richard Freitag , 4. Andreas Wellinger )

3. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Kamil Stoch, 3. Dawid Kubacki, 4. Maciej Kot)

18.03.2017, Vikersund

1. Norway (1. Daniel Andre Tande, 2. Robert Johansson, 3. Johann Andre Forfang, 4. Andreas Stjernen)

2. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Dawid Kubacki, 3. Maciej Kot, 4. Kamil Stoch)

3. Austria (1. Michael Hayböck, 2. Manuel Fettner, 3. Gregor Schlierenzauer, 4. Stefan Kraft)

25.03.2017, Planica:

1. Norway (1. Robert Johansson, 2. Johann Andre Forfang, 3. Anders Fannemel, 4. Andreas Stjernen)

2. Germany (1. Markus Eisenbichler, 2. Richard Freitag, 3. Karl Geiger, 4. Andreas Wellinger)

3. Poland (1. Piotr Żyła, 2. Dawid Kubacki, 3. Maciej Kot, 4. Kamil Stoch)

65. Four Hills Tournament

30.12.2016, Oberstdorf: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Kamil Stoch 3. Michael Hayböck

1.01.2017, Garmisch-Partenkirchen: 1. Daniel Andre Tande, 2. Kamil Stoch, 3. Stefan Kraft

4.01.2017, Innsbruck: 1. Daniel Andre Tande, 2. Robert Johannson 3. Evgeniy Klimov

6.01.2017, Bischofshofen: 1. Kamil Stoch, Michael Hayböck, 3. Piotr Żyła

Final classification: 1. Kamil Stoch, 2. Piotr Żyła 3. Daniel Andre Tande

Jumpers with 4/4 competitions: 34

Ski Flying World Cup

4.02.2017, Oberstdorf: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger 3. Kamil Stoch

5.02.2017, Oberstdorf: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Jurij Tepes

19.03.2017, Vikersund: 1. Kamil Stoch, 2. Noriaki Kasai, 3. Michael Hayböck

24.03.2017, Planica: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Markus Eisenbichler

26.03.2017, Planica: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Noriaki Kasai

Final classification: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Kamil Stoch

Jumpers with 5/5 competitions: 21

Lahti 2017

25.02.2017, individual normal hill: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Markus Eisenbichler

2.03.2017, individual large hill: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Piotr Żyła

4.03.2017, team large hill: 1. Poland, 2. Norway, 3. Austria

Raw Air

10.03.2017, Oslo, prolog - 1. Andreas Wellinger, 2. Peter Prevc 3. Richard Freitag

11.03.2017, Oslo, team competition - 1. Austria, 2. Germany 3. Poland

12.03.2017, Oslo, competition - 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Markus Eisenbichler

13.03.2017, Lillehammer, prolog - 1 Markus Eisenbichler, 2. Richard Freitag, 3. Stefan Kraft

14.03.2017, Lillehammer, competition - cancelled

15.03.2017, Trondheim, prolog - 1. Kamil Stoch, 2. Andreas Stjernen, 3. Andreas Wellinger

16.03.2017, Trondheim, competition - 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Andreas Stjernen, 3. Andreas Wellinger

17.03.2017, Vikersund, competition (An additional competition in place of Lillehammer) - cancelled

17.03.2017, Vikersund, prolog - 1. Kamil Stoch, 2. Andreas Wellinger, 3. Domen Prevc

18.03.2017, Vikersund, team competition - 1. Norway, 2. Poland 3. Austria

19.03.2017, Vikersund, competition - 1. Kamil Stoch, 2. Noriaki Kasai 3. Michael Hayböck

Final classification: 1. Stefan Kraft, 2. Kamil Stoch, 3. Andreas Wellinger

Jumpers with full number on jumps: 11

Interesting/Fun facts:

  • Daniel Andre Tande was never 4th when Maciej Kot was 5th and vice versa.
  • Andreas Wellinger gained more second places (8) than Daniel Andre Tande fourths (7) and Maciej Kot fifths (5).
  • Poland is the only team, which had used only four players in all six team competitions.
  • Slovenia had used a total of 10 players in team competitions.
  • Poland is the only team, which had stood on the podium in all team competitions (2 wins, 2 second places, 2 third places).
  • Austria had the most used jumpers (17) and the most pointers (11)
  • Fatih Arda Ipcioglu didn’t qualified for the Lillehammer’s contest in Raw Air tournament, but that competition was cancelled later. That means Turk formally didn’t made debut in World Cup, but he was on 81 place in the RA tournament.
  • The organizers disqualified jumpers 28 times.
  • Four players gained points in every World Cup competition - Manuel Fettner, Kamil Stoch, Maciej Kot and Piotr Żyła.
  • Vincent Descombes Sevoie gained more points than Switzerland (including team competition).
  • Robert Johansson beat ski flying hill record twice (in Vikersund and Planica), but Stefan Kraft jumped further same days.
  • A total of 15 players were in the TOP10 of World Cup’s classification. Without final TOP10, were there: Severin Freund, Vincent Descombes Sevoie, Karl Geiger, Andreas Kofler, Piotr Żyła.

2016-17 in screens

(last picture was made by me :3)

2016-17 Awards (imo only)

Jumper of the season: Stefan Kraft

Revelation of the season: Robert Johansson

Disappointment of the season: Simon Ammann

Surprise of the season: Vincent Descombes Sevoie

Team of the season: Poland

Coach of the season: Stefan Horngacher (Poland)

Jump of the season: Stefan Kraft (253,5 metres in Vikersund)

Competition of the season: 18,03,2017, Vikersund, team competition

Fail of the season: Andreas Wellinger (19.03.2017, Vikersund, final RA competition)

Character of the season: Domen Prevc

SEE YOU IN 2017-18!!!

Rebelcaptain Celebrity Pretend Relationship AU: Three Pieces of Jewelry

Jyn has a perfectly valid reason to show up at his door the day after Cassian’s party: the rose gold and quartz necklace her mother gave her when she turned sixteen is somewhere in his house, and with them flying out to Chicago in two days for their first location shoot, she doesn’t want to forget about it. On his patio it had caught on her hair on her neck, and Leia had helped her take it off to untangle it. But a distraction–Han Solo throwing a soccer ball into Cassian’s vintage turntable that he had put on the lawn furniture–had distracted everyone. Perhaps Leia hadn’t gotten the clasp on right; and Jyn certainly hadn’t noticed that it was gone until she woke up–the couple of drinks in her system hadn’t helped her memory, either. But she wants it back, and she hopes it won’t take too long to find.

To her irritation, her texts and phone calls to Cassian go unanswered, but she’s in the area and figures she can ring the bell and maybe the housekeeper could let her in for a look. In fact, she hopes the housekeeper is the only one there so she can look in peace, but when she rings the door, it’s him. Of course it’s him. And he’s in the middle of buttoning up a dress shirt.

“Jyn?”

“Sorry!” she sputters. “I called and texted but you didn’t answer … my necklace. I lost it here last night.”

“Come in,” he says without asking her any questions, without being rude or snarky, and it surprises her, though she’s not sure why. “I’m sorry I missed your call, but as you can see,” he says sweeping his hand, “I’m in the middle of something.”

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