skate key

4

“Sports athletes you want to be as your boyfriend” ranking :
1st. Shohei OHTANI
2nd. Yuzuru HANYU
3rd. Kei NISHIKORI

The pict below is the reasons for choosing Yuzuru by the voters :

💟 He looks kind
💟 He looks like a prince
💟 His smile which tickles your maternal instinct
💟 He hates to lose
💟 He is ambitious
💟 (the voters) want to dote him with love
💟 to bring him up/ to nurture him ( this part is a bit confusing, cmiiw if you have better translation please inform me ^^ )

*disclaimer : i might not do justice to the 100% correct translation, please do inform me for any correction ^_^

Source : x

Part 3 of 3 for my gift exchange gift for @enterprisecaptainoikawa! She requested “aromantic/asexual spectrum tsukkiyama, punk tsukkiyama, band au, ice skating/yuri on ice au ahhh, professor/bibliophile au, tsukkiyama as best friends, really anything tbh bless”! An au in which Tsukishima is a figure skating coach and Yamaguchi brings his little sister into his rink for lessons: 

“Tsukki! I’m so sorry I’m late! So Sorry!” Tadashi scrambles into the rink, pulling his sister behind him, and all but dives onto a bench, dropping his bag and quickly tries to lace his skates despite his shaking fingers. He’s never been late to a practice before and–

“Tada-nii-san calm down. Kei-sensei isn’t even here yet. 

“Huh?” Tadashi looks up to see Hotarou is right. Kei isn’t even here yet. He frowns. Kei is never late. 

“Sorry I’m late, Yamaguchi, Akiteru-nii– Oh.” Tadashi looks up at his coach, and finds the blond looking at him with a frown. “You’re late.” 

“Yeah, sorry, Hotarou’s club activities went longer than usual, and I can’t let her walk alone–” 

“Oh, Yamaguchi…” 

“Sorry!” Tadashi stands and bows, his skates now on and laced, and Kei just waves him off. 

“It’s fine. I’m late as well.” Kei shakes his head. He, at least, already has his skates on and guards off, and so they both step onto the ice. 

“We’re going to work on your step sequencing today, ok? But first, ten

“What? But you were late too–” 

Kei gives Tadashi his I mean business look, and Tadashi huffs, pushing away from his brute of a coach and beginning his laps. He supposes he should be glad, though– because he was late today, he hasn’t had time to stretch out. Laps may be a nice warm up…

“Yamaguchi, don’t be lazy in your stroking just because it’s a punishment! Arms up, long, powerful strokes! Be lucky it isn’t more~” 

“Yes, sensei,” Tadashi says with a sigh, raising his arms diligently. He supposes his punishment is pretty light; he’s glad Kei is recognizing the fact that this is his first time being late. He can hear Hotarou giggling, and sticks her tongue out at her when he passes her. She sticks her tongue out right back at him. 

“Yamaguchi, focus!” 

Practice goes on smoothly, and by the end he’s worked up a pleasant sweat. Collapsing onto the bench outside the rink once again, unlacing his skates slowly. He’s careful of his left ankle, still healing from an earlier sprain. Hotarou jumps on his back with a grin. 

“Tada-nii can we have McDonalds for dinner?” 

Tadashi groans. “Tarou-chan, you know I have a competition soon…” 

“Can...I have McDonalds for dinner?” 

“Hotarou…” 

“I think it’s fine, let her have some junk food~ Even though you’re not allowed to.” Tadashi startles at his coaches voice behind him, and he glares at the smirking Kei. “You and I can make your dinner at your apartment.” 

Tadashi huffs, but agrees anyway. The walk is full of Hotarou’s chatter about her day. They all fall easily into routine. Every day is the same. Tadashi goes to the rink at four in the morning, and stays until six before he and Hotarou have to go to school; after school, Tadashi walks Hotarou to her after-school community ed club activities, and then picks her up and they go to the rink together. Then, Tadashi and Hotarou would walk home, Kei accompanying them because – despite how they may act on the ice – they’re quite close. The third year in high school even kind of considers his coach to be his best friend, even though Tsukishima is twenty-five and they can’t really sympathize with each other’s day-by-day issues. 

Tadashi can’t quite break it down into a few words, but…their routine is nice, to say the lease. 

“Tsukki, stop spoiling Hotarou. I know you share a kanji, but she doesn’t need ice cream every time we eat out, especially considering how often we do…” 

“She’s cute, though,” Kei says with a pout, and Tadashi sighs. He is right. Hotarou, with her pudgy, round, six-year-old cheeks, and her tan skin and light hair almost completely unlike Tadashi’s own looks, is adorable. “But hey, if you’re jealous, after you finish your next competition I’ll buy you all the ice cream you want.” 

Tadashi perks up. “Really?!” 

Kei smirks, and Tadashi knows what this means. 

“Only if you get first.” 

Tadashi groans, but he’s at least thankful he isn’t going into the professional skating business. He would never be able to compete with the big names in skating. But oh, god, would he like to meet Yuzuru Hanyu…

“Oi. Yamaguchi. I can tell what you’re thinking~” 

Tadashi flushes, and whacks Kei lightly. Hotarou skips lightly ahead, singing about her chicken nuggets and licking at her ice cream. Kei smirks. “What, we both know about your overtly sexual fantasies about Yuzuru Hanyu~” 

“Oh my god stop it!” 

“Embarrassed, Yamaguchi-kun?” 

“Yes! Very!” 

This is typically part of their routine as well. Kei teasing Tadashi– he doesn’t know how he feels about this. Their relationship is…something…off the rink. Something new, that Tadashi doesn’t know how to describe. They joke and flirt and go home together, make dinner, eat together…But on the rink they’re professional and distant; Tadashi likes it like that. 

Suddenly Hotarou stops in her skipping and singing, and turns to the two. Tadashi panics for a second thinking his poor baby sister’s heard about his sexual fantasies. 

“Tadashi-nii-san, Kei-sensei! I almost forgot! I drew something for you today!” Hotarou pulls off her backpack, and Tadashi and Kei stop walking, and watch as she shuffles through the obscenely pink bag. It takes a moment, but eventually Hotarou pulls out a couple of papers, and thrusts one at Tadashi and the other at Kei. “We were supposed to draw who we look up to, and even though we only had to draw one I drew two because I look up to both of you!” 

Tadashi’s heart clenches, and he coos at his baby sister. He looks down at the paper in his hand and sees a child’s drawing of whom he assumes is himself on his skates, smiling, and the words “my brather Tadashi is a ice skater i look up to him becase he works hard” in Hotarou’s handwriting under it. Immediately he wants to take his sister into his arms and squeeze her tight. 

He looks over to see Kei tearing up, holding his picture in a tight grip. Kei’s paper is similar to Tadashi’s; Kei on his skates, smiling. His glasses are just two squares barely on his eyes. Under the picture, Hotarou wrote: “my brathers coash Kei-sensei is nice to my brather and so i look up to him to becase a lot of boys are mean to him” and when Tadashi reads it tears well up in his own eyes. 

Kei speaks first. “Tha- Thank you, so much, Hotarou-chan.” 

“Yeah. Thank you so much Tarou-chan. You’re so sweet my little lightning bug.” 

Hotarou beams at them, and grabs their free hands, tugging. 

“I’m glad you like them! Now let’s go! I want to eat my chicken nuggets!” 

Tadashi and Kei follow along, crying, and Hotarou continues her chicken nugget song. They share a look, and the message is clear: 

You’re winning this competition. For Hotarou.

anonymous asked:

How do you think Ymir's idea/founding of Freedom in 89 connects or contributes thematically throughout the series and how it may come up in future chapters? Or what Isayama has left to address in these final arcs/chapters. Honestly I'd just love to read your thoughts/writings on the characters, the details you've noticed that are tying it all together and where it may end up. (not concrete predictions, your chapter 90 thoughts highlighted the joy in the spontaneity and odd choices the writing)

This question is my new favorite.

The intensely interesting thing about Ymir is that in her story, it is spelled out as explicitly as you ever could ask for that Paradis is her freedom.

Chronologically, at this point in the story, everyone is running around screaming over their home being destroyed. They’re buckling down and racing further inside the walls as fast as they can, filling their cage to max capacity and throwing people out to die so the rest of them can survive.

Ymir opens her eyes in this place, and she sees freedom. She’s alive, and she has her mind back, and there’s no one nearby who wants her dead. She can do whatever she wants, and it’s the most beautiful thing she’s ever seen.

That’s the vision we’re presented with as Paradis comes to grips with the fact that they’re hated by the entire world. Ymir doesn’t see the walls closing in; she looks up at the sky and finds life.

And she opens that statement with how little individual humans matter. They’re sort of meaningless, right? There’s no real value in any of her flailing, or anyone else’s.

Except when she reaches Paradis, she can choose.

She doesn’t matter. There’s no significance to her struggles.

She still has the power to do whatever the heck she wants.

That’s so cool.

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I was originally just going to make a quick salty post about this passage (from this here article on Yuri on Ice published by The Verge) because there have been few times I’ve wanted to immediately burn the words in a publication more, but… apparently, this is a common misconception by Yuri on Ice watchers.

It seems that this anime is inadvertently giving people a warped view of competitive figure skating. Now, it’s not the show’s fault: Yuri on Ice is beautifully and meticulously researched and most of its inaccuracies are purposeful, serving as plot device. But I get the feeling that the Grand Prix setting, Yūri’s unreliable narration and the existence of Viktor are leading people to severely underestimate the difficulty of the sport and Yūri’s skill.

Let’s get this out of the way:

Katsuki Yūri is an outstanding skater.

Originally posted by mystic-snk

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Watch on shoma-uno.tumblr.com

12/18 Shoma’s pre-Nationals interview with Daisuke Takahashi

The clip starts out with the 2017 highly anticipated and promising athlete ranking: 1) Otani Shohei (baseball), 2) Uno Shoma (figure skating), 3) Nishikori Kei (tennis), 4) Hanyu Yuzuru (figure skating), 5) Shirai Kenzo (gymnastics).

[Cut to interview]
Dai: Was there something you told yourself or some sort of trick to land the quad flip?
Shoma: (After last season’s seventh place finish at Worlds) I gathered myself and wanted to do something fun, but the quad lutz is probably out of the question so I thought why not try the flip.
Dai: It took you a really short time to land it, didn’t it?
Shoma: I landed it on the first day when I was practicing it for the first time.
Dai: That’s amazing?? How many years did I work on it… and I only landed it once!

[Dreams on Ice 2012 clip with Yamada]
Yamada:
He loves skating so he works really hard. He’s always been a hard worker. Yaaay! We’ll do our best, thanks for supporting us.
Shoma: I’ll do my best!

[Cut back to interview]
Dai: Do you remember this flip board? You wrote it.
Shoma: Eh, when?

It’s a “Future Report” he wrote in November 2014 of his goals.
2014: Land 4T & 3A in competition.
2015: Move up to seniors.
2016: ?
2017: ?
2018: Skate in the Olympics.

Shoma (in 2014): I want to improve even more, and during that time, I’m not sure how much I can improve so we’ll see what happens.

Dai: So when you first wrote this, you left it as “we’ll see what happens,” so how do you feel about it right now?
Shoma: At the time, I wasn’t thinking that far ahead. I was primarily focused on consistency with the quad toe loop and triple axel. I didn’t see past those instances so that’s why I wrote “we’ll see what happens.” My current state is definitely not something I imagined. It’s beyond what I could imagine.

Dai (watching Shoma practice): Saying things like, “I want to win” or “I want to become like this or that,” he’s changed. You can feel he’s taking on the responsibility of being a skater representing Japan.

Dai: Before you said, “No matter what you did, you wouldn’t be able to beat Hanyu-senshu,” have you changed from that position?
Shoma: It’s changed a lot. It’s changed from “I’m still a long ways from winning” to “I want to win.”
Dai: More determined now, yeah?
Shoma: I’m training now to catch up to Yuzu-kun to become a skater that can compete on his level. It’s what I remind myself when the going gets tough. I’m glad there are still a lot of goals for me to achieve.

Back to the “Future Report,” a goal was added for 2016.
2016: Beating Yuzu-kun.

anyway here’s the haikyuu roller derby au no one asked for 

Tips & Dibs - Baekhyun

Based off of this drabble which inspired everything that follows.

(In this line of business, roller skates are key.) 

“A waiter?”

Kyungsoo doesn’t answer you immediately, his spatula picking up speed as he slabs more meat onto the grill, barely perspiring under the heat of the kitchen. In comparison, you’re beginning to feel sticky all over even though it’s only been about five minutes since you came in.

And you’re in a dress.  

By that, you mean an old fashioned blue car hop dress with a frilly hem and white apron, a get up that screams ‘retro’. Except you don’t deliver to cars because this place doesn’t do drive-ins. Thus explaining the breakfast and lunch rush hours that occurs on a daily basis.

Kyungsoo gets the brunt of the work by having to stand in front of the stove, fryer, and other heated appliances all day. On the other hand, you’re part of the fancy show that the place is known for, zipping down tables on your roller skates and flashing polite smiles along with your two other girls who have mastered the art of waitressing under unusual circumstances.

It’s not every day you come across a well operated diner who still does it the old fashioned way.

But with popularity comes consequences, and said consequences include working to the bone on grueling ten hour shifts, reoccurring blisters on your feet, and occasional catcalling from idiots who drive you and the girls over the edge.

These are only some of the cons that apply. One other more prominent issue is your small sized staff that’s in desperate need of expansion.

Which brings you to your current conversation.

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