sixteen personality types

INFPs I’ve Met (by an INFJ)

What I noticed and observed about them: (3 Males & 2 Females)

  1. They are the introverts with a lot of friends. 
  2. Each of them have some sort of hidden talent that I don’t even know why they keep hidden in the first place. They are just so humble. (It’s annoying– I LOVE THEM). Their hidden talent most likely has something to do with the arts. 
  3. They are writers. The ones I know write blog posts, poetry, witty Facebook statuses, music, and lyrics. Self-expression is definitely a necessity for them.
  4. Two of the INFP males I know have this innocent aura that will make you want to be super nice to them and even take care of them and not bully them even if they look so easy to bully. They’re that pure.
  5. The other INFP male I know looked very tense and jittery before I first talked to him. But once I got him to start talking, he easily opened up. You just gotta reach out first.
  6. Once you reach out to them, they will open up and you’ll discover that they are such cool people with strong opinions and beliefs. (pretty much closet ENFPs)
  7. The two INFP females on the other hand were the ones who seemed loud at first–probably ‘cause they were with their friends–but ended up being really deep and humble people (I love it).
  8. They are nice and civil to everyone. They don’t show it when they dislike someone (however, their close friends will know). They’re just that easygoing, which is why they have a lot of friends. (who are actually just mostly acquaintances to them–but they won’t tell them)
  9. They have such good humor. Especially their sarcasm. AND THE TIMING OF THEIR JOKES IS PERFECT.
  10. When they’re with their friends, you wouldn’t even think they’re introverts. They are so loud and lively with them (mostly the girl INFPs I’ve met are like this–the INFP males on the other hand are more obviously introverted). 
  11. Everyone likes them. I’m serious, what’s not to like? They are such good-hearted and open-minded people (even if they have strong beliefs). Before you know it, you’re completely yourself when you’re around them. They just make you feel homey.
  12. When they’re in a bad mood, they distance themselves. They just don’t want to be a burden, even to their friends. No matter how many times you insist to be there for them, they will shake their heads and handle their problems by themselves. After all, the fight is in their head.
  13. When they present alone in front (in class), they can be the most awkward people ever. But they do have a lot of meaningful things to say. They just aren’t used to taking the stage.
  14. Most of the ones I know suffer with anxiety. This is most likely due to the fact that they feel so deeply and tend to keep it inside–after all, Fi is their most dominant function. 
  15. They are the nicest people ever (even if it’s not all that obvious), but if you hurt them on purpose–they will remember you for it. But they will forgive (on the outside).
  16. They are the life of the party even if they aren’t loud. I don’t know, like when they aren’t present in their group of friends–there is obviously something missing. 
  17. They are good with one-on-one conversations. It’s amazing how even though they aren’t good with big crowds, they have this ability to talk to a stranger for a second and make them feel comfortable (if they want to, that is). 
  18. They are not boring at all. It’s an Ne thing–their second dominant function–that makes them so talkative and animated. If they aren’t talking about something, they’re either making weird sounds to make others laugh or saying funny movie lines aloud (similar to INTPs). 
  19. They are smart. They have their own way of understanding things and they are not clueless–I swear, they know a little about everything. Just give them a topic, and they will have an opinion about it.
  20. They have trouble saying no. I swear, the last thing they want to do is hurt someone. (Unless it’s for justice)  
  21. Music is extremely important to them. The INFPs I know either dance, play guitar, sing, or well–just need their earphones with them everyday to block out the world when they feel like it. 
  22. The vibes they give off, equal to their current mood. They are infectious.

Well, what do you guys think? :)  Agree or disagree?

MY WRITING MASTERPOST

I just have a lot of writing tips and masterposts and just stuff in my likes and I decided to put them all into this. All rights goes to the people who made them.

Cool Other Masterposts:

  • Writing Specific Characters
  • Writing References
  • Writing Masterpost
  • Character Guides
  • Writing Help for Writers
  • Ultimate Writing Resource List
  • Lots of RP Guides
  • Online Writing Resources
  • List of Websites to Help You Focus
  • Resources for Writing Bio’s
  • Helpful Links for Writing Help
  • General Writing Resources
  • Resources for Biography Writing
  • Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
  • 8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  • The Ultimate Writing Masterpost

General:

  • The Official Ten-Step Guide to Becoming the Next Gatsby
  • The Periodic Table of Storytelling
  • Joss Whedon’s Top 10 Writing Tips
  • Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone
  • 34 Writing Tips that will make you a Better Writer
  • 50 Free resources that will improve your writing skills
  • 5 ways to get out of the comfort zone and become a stronger writer
  • 10 ways to avoid Writing Insecurity
  • The Writer’s Guide to Overcoming Insecurity
  • The Difference Between Good Writers and Bad Writers
  • You’re Not Hemingway - Developing Your Own Style
  • 7 Ways to use Brain Science to Hook Readers and Reel them In
  • 8 Short Story Tips from Kurt Vonnegut
  • How to Show, Not Tell
  • 5 Essential Story Ingredients
  • How to Write Fiction that grabs your readers from page one
  • Why research is important in writing
  • Make Your Reader Root for Your Main Character
  • Writing Ergonomics (Staying Comfortable Whilst Writing)
  • The Importance of Body Language
  • Fashion Terminology
  • All About Kissing
  • Genre Help: Romance
  • 187 Mental Illnesses
  • Types of Mental Illness
  • Eye Color List
  • Spectral Groupings
  • Do you have trouble creating your titles?
  • On being a co-writer || Additional tips on effective co-writing 
  • The length of a chapter
  • How to deal with too many story ideas
  • On writing two stories simultaneously || a similar ask
  • When a story stops working
  • Copyright
  • Reading critically for writers
  • The question of outlining
  • Avoiding publishing scams
  • Finding story ideas
  • Tips on building a platform [guest blog]
  • How much does writing “in genre” matter?
  • What a “real writer” is
  • Pennames and aliases
  • A series of thoughts on series titles
  • The self-pub miniseries: the why
  • The self-pub miniseries: the what
  • Rewriting fanfiction into original fiction
  • Formatting long quotes and songs 

Characters:

  • 10 days of Character Building
  • Name Generators
  • Name Playground
  • Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test
  • Seven Common Character Types
  • Handling a Cast of Thousands Part 1 - Getting To Know Your Characters
  • Web Resources for Developing Characters
  • Building Fictional Characters
  • Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
  • Body Language Cheat
  • Body Language Reference Cheat
  • Tips for Writers: Body Language
  • Types of Crying
  • Body Language: Mirroring
  • Character Building Workshop
  • Tips for Characterization
  • Character Chart for Fiction Writers
  • Villains are people too but…
  • How to Write a Character Bible
  • Character Development Exercises
  • All Your Characters Talk the Same - And They’re Not A Hivemind!
  • Medieval Names Archive
  • Sympathy Without Saintliness
  • Family Echo (Family Tree Maker)
  • Behind The Name
  • 100 Character Development Questions for Writers
  • Aether’s Character Development Worksheet
  • The 12 Common Archetypes
  • Six Types of Courageous Characters
  • Kazza’s List of Character Secrets - Part 1, Part 2
  • Creating Believable Characters With Personality
  • Angry
  • Bad Asses
  • Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
  • Childishness
  • Emotional Detachment
  • Flirtatious
  • The Girl Next Door
  • Introverts (2)
  • Mean Persons (2)
  • Psychopaths
  • Party Girls
  • Rich (2) 
  • Rebels
  • Sarcasm
  • Serial Killers (2)
  • Shyness (2, 3)
  • Sluts
  • Villains (2)
  • Witt
  • Body Language Cheat Sheet
  • Creating Fictional Characters Series
  • Three Ways to Avoid Lazy Character Description
  • 7 Rules for Picking Names for Fictional Characters
  • Character Development Questionnaire
  • How to Create Fictional Characters
  • Character Name Resources
  • Character Development Template
  • Character Development Through Hobbies
  • Character Flaws List
  • 10 Questions for Creating Believable Characters
  • Ari’s Archetype Series
  • How to Craft Compelling Characters
  • List of 200 Character Traits
  • Writing Characters of the Opposite Sex
  • Making Your Characters Likable
  • Do you really know your characters?
  • Character Development: Virtues
  • Character Development: Vices
  • Character Morality Alignment
  • List of Negative Personality Traits
  • List of Positive Personality Traits
  • List of Emotions - Positive
  • List of Emotions - Negative
  • Loon’s Character Development Series - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
  • Phobia List A-L (Part 1), M-Z (Part 2)
  • 30 Day In Depth Character Development Meme
  • Words for Emotions based on Severity
  • Eight Bad Characters
  • High Level Description of the Sixteen Personality Types
  • How Not to Write Female Characters
  • Writing Female Characters
  • How to write empowering female characters
  • Why I write strong female characters
  • Red Flags for Female Characters Written by Men
  • Writing strong female characters
  • The Female Character Flowchart
  • Eight Heroine Archetypes
  • Eight Hero Archetypes
  • Help on picking character names
  • A tip about realistic characters
  • Strategies to create believable characters
  • Additional tips on writing PoC characters
  • Advice on writing genders
  • Creating unstable characters
  • Ambiguous Antagonists
  • A tidbit on psychological trauma [trigger warnings]
  • On writing accents
  • What makes characters stick with me
  • Sweetening up character description
  • Making an introverted character stand out
  • Conveying too much or too little character “inner reflection”
  • Revealing a character’s asexual orientation
  • Revealing a character’s gender & orientation
  • A habit of killing characters
  • When characters aren’t standing out
  • Breaking hearts with character deaths
  • Quick tips on expressing character 
  • Character development versus pacing 
  • A mini guide to character voice
  • A Description Resource
  • 55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
  • Describing Skin Colors
  • Describing a Person: Adding Details
  • Emotions Vocabulary
  • 90 Words For ‘Looks’
  • Be More Descriptive
  • Describe a Character’s Look Well
  • 100 Words for Facial Expressions
  • To Show and Not To Tell
  • Words to Describe Facial Expressions
  • Describing Clothes
  • List of Actions
  • Tone, Feelings and Emotions
  • Writing A Vampire
  • Writing Pansexual Characters
  • Writing Characters on the Police Force
  • Writing Drunk Characters
  • Writing A Manipulative Character
  • Writing A Friends With Benefits Relationship
  • Writing A Natural Born Leader
  • Writing A Flirtatious Character
  • Writing A Nice Character
  • Fiction Writing Exercises for Creating Villains
  • Five Traits to Contribute to an Epic Villain
  • Writing Villains that Rock
  • Writing British Characters
  • How To Write A Character With A Baby
  • On Assassin Characters
  • Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder
  • Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
  • Avoidant Personality Disorder
  • Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
  • Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
  • Cotard Delusions
  • Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
  • Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
  • Facitious Disorders
  • Histrionic Personality Disorder
  • Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
  • Narcissistic Personality Disorder
  • Night Terrors
  • Kleptomania (2)
  • A Pyromaniac
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Psychopaths
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2) (3)
  • Sex Addiction (2)
  • Schizophrenia (2)
  • Sociopaths (2)
  • Aspergers Syndrome
  • Apathy 
  • Autism
  • Someone Blind (2)
  • Cancer (2, 3)
  • Disability
  • Dyslexia
  • Muteness (2, 3)
  • Stutter
  • Actors
  • Ballet Dancer (2)
  • Christianity
  • Foreigners
  • Gamblers
  • Hinduism
  • Hitmen
  • Satanism
  • Smokers
  • Stoners
  • Taoism
  • Journalists
  • Vegetarians
  • Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Cocaine Influence
  • Ecstasy Influence (2)
  • Heroin Use
  • LSD Influence
  • Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
  • Opiate Use

Tips on Writing Dialogue:

  • It’s Not What They Say…
  • Top 8 Tips for Writing Dialogue
  • Speaking of Dialogue
  • The Great Said Debate
  • He Said, She Said, Who Said What?
  • How to Write Dialogue Unique to Your Characters
  • Writing Dialogue: Go for Realistic, Not Real-Life

Tips on Writing Point of View:

  • Establishing The Right Point of View
  • How to Start Writing in the Third Person
  • The I Problem

Style & Craft of Writing:

  • The literary “weak verb”
  • Do you have word tics?
  • Victoria’s Vitamins: vague descriptive words
  • Victoria’s Vitamins: mood
  • Breaking writing habits
  • Varying sentences
  • Describing colors
  • Sweetening up character description
  • Purple prose
  • Grammar is a tricksy thing
  • “Smartening” the language of your narrative
  • Building suspense and making readers sweat
  • A couple tips about description in fast-paced scenes

Content:

  • The story of exposition
  • 10 ways to hit your reader in the gut
  • Make your reader root for your main character
  • Make your reader hold their breath
  • What’s the big deal about intros?
  • A tip about description
  • The word count of your manuscript
  • Things that make me keep reading
  • Choosing ideas and endings
  • When to describe setting
  • Battling cliches
  • Is your story YA, NA, or adult?
  • When a plot isn’t strong enough to make a whole story
  • Flashbacks with multiple POVs
  • Bulking up your word count
  • Avoiding cliches
  • Conquer that opening line || response || discussion
  • Tips on revealing setting awesomely kind of
  • Deciding between different ideas for the same story 

Revision:

  • You’ve finished your manuscript! Now what?
  • Revision sucks but doesn’t have to suck
  • Where to find beta readers/critique partners
  • Tips on taking critique
  • Tips on giving critique
  • What to do with bad writing advice
  • Additional insight on bad writing advice
  • Five quick steps to get into revising that manuscript
  • When to say you’re done revising
  • Beginning the awesome journey of revision
  • Friends are not always the best readers 

Plot, Structure, & Outline:

  • Writing A Novel Using the Snowflake Method
  • Effectively Outlining Your Novel
  • Conflict and Character Within Story Structure
  • Outlining Your Plot
  • Ideas, Plots and Using the Premise Sheets
  • How To Write A Novel
  • Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense
  • Plunge Right In…Into Your Story, That Is
  • Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot
  • 36 (plus one) Dramatic Situations
  • The Evil Overlord Devises A Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plot Tricks
  • Conflict Test
  • What is Conflict?
  • Monomyth
  • The Hero’s Journey: Summary of Steps
  • Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes
  • Plotting Without Fears
  • Novel Outlining 101
  • Writing The Perfect Scene
  • One-Page Plotting
  • The Great Swampy Middle
  • How Can You Know What Belongs In Your Book?
  • Create A Plot Outline in 8 Easy Steps
  • How to Organize and Develop Ideas for Your Novel
  • Create Structure in your novel using index cards
  • Choosing the best outline method for you
  • Hatch’s Plot Bank

Setting & Making Your Own World

  • Magical Word Builder’s Guide
  • I Love The End Of The World
  • World Building 101
  • The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help Bring Your Settings to Life
  • Creating the Perfect Setting - Part 1
  • Creating a Believable World
  • Setting
  • Character and Setting Interactions
  • Maps Workshop - Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping
  • World Builders Project
  • How To Create Fantasy Worlds
  • Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds

Helpful Tools & Software:

  • Tip Of My Tongue - Find the word you’re looking for
  • Write or Die - Stay motivated
  • Stay Focused - Tool for Chrome, lock yourself out of distracting websites
  • My Writing Nook - Online Text Editor, Free
  • Bubbl.us - Online Mind Map Application, Free
  • Family Echo - Online Family Tree Maker, Free
  • Freemind - Mind Map Application; Free; Windows, Mac, Linux, Portable
  • Xmind - Mind Map Application; Free; Windows, Mac, Linux, Portable
  • Liquid Story Binder - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $45.95; Windows, Portable
  • Scrivener - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $39.95; Mac
  • SuperNotecard - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable
  • yWriter - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free; Windows, Linux, portable
  • JDarkRoom - Minimalist Text Editing Application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable
  • AutoRealm - Map Creation Application; free; Windows, Linux with Wine

Grammer & Revision:

  • How To Rewrite
  • Editing Recipe
  • Cliche Finder
  • Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written
  • Writing 101: Revising A Novel
  • 20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes
  • Synonyms for the Most Commonly Used Words of the English Language
  • Grammar Urban Legends
  • Words Instead of Walk (2)
  • Commonly Confused Adjectives
  • A Guide on Punctuation
  • Common Writing Mistakes
  • 25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
  • How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
  • Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
  • The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
  • Other Ways to Say..
  • Proofreading
  • 300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
  • List of Misused Words
  • Words for Sex
  • 100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
  • Words to Use More Often
  • Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
  • Three Self Editing Tips
  • Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
  • Synonyms for Common Words
  • Alternatives for ‘Smile’
  • Transitional Words
  • The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
  • Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
  • A Case Of She Said, She Said

Creativity Boosters:

  • *Creative Writing Prompts
  • *Ink Provoking
  • *Story Starter
  • *Story Spinner
  • *Story Kitchen
  • *Language is a Virus
  • *The Dabbling Mum
  • Quick Story Idea Generator
  • Solve Your Problems By Simply Saying Them Out Loud
  • Busting Your Writing Rut
  • Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips To Engineer A Productive Flow
  • Writing Inspiration, Or Sex on a Bicycle
  • The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes
  • Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits
  • Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging
  • Random Book Title Generator
  • Finishing Your Novel
  • Story Starters & Idea Generators
  • Words to Use More Often
  • How to: Cure Writer’s Block
  • Some Tips on Writer’s Block
  • Got Writer’s Block?
  • 6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
  • Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block

Improvement:

  • Improve Your Writing Habits Now
  • 5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
  • Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
  • Improve Your Paras
  • Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
  • 4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
  • Writing Better Than You Normally Do
  • How’s My Driving?

Motivation:

  • Backhanding procrastination
  • On habits and taking care of yourself || Response
  • More troubles with writing motivation
  • The inner critic and ways to fight it
  • The writing life is hard on us
  • For troubles with starting your story
  • Writing to be published
  • “You’re a writer, will you write this for me?”
  • Writing a story that’s doomed to suck
  • Writing stamina builds slowly
  • When depression goes and writing goes with it
  • Additional inner critic strategies
  • Tips on conquering NaNoWriMo (or any project, really)
  • You will change as a writer
  • Ways to keep writing while in school
  • 13 quick tips when you’re starting your novel
  • First draft blues
  • Getting in your own way 

Writing an Application:

  • How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
  • How to: Make Your App Better
  • How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
  • 10 Tips for Applying
  • Para Sample Ideas
  • 5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
  • Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
  • How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
  • How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
  • How to: Lengthen Short Para’s

Prompts:

  • Drabble Stuff
  • Prompts List
  • Writing Prompts
  • Drabble Prompts
  • How to Get Into Character
  • Writing Challenges/Prompts
  • A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
  • Para Prompts & Ideas
  • Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
  • A List of Para Starters
The Sixteen Personality Types

ISTJ - The Duty Fulfiller - Serious and quiet, interested in security and peaceful living. Extremely thorough, responsible, and dependable. Well-developed powers of concentration. Usually interested in supporting and promoting traditions and establishments. Well-organized and hard working, they work steadily towards identified goals. They can usually accomplish any task once they have set their mind to it.

ISTP - The Mechanic - Quiet and reserved, interested in how and why things work. Excellent skills with mechanical things. Risk-takers who they live for the moment. Usually interested in and talented at extreme sports. Uncomplicated in their desires. Loyal to their peers and to their internal value systems, but not overly concerned with respecting laws and rules if they get in the way of getting something done. Detached and analytical, they excel at finding solutions to practical problems.

ISFJ - The Nurturer - Quiet, kind, and conscientious. Can be depended on to follow through. Usually puts the needs of others above their own needs. Stable and practical, they value security and traditions. Well-developed sense of space and function. Rich inner world of observations about people. Extremely perceptive of other’s feelings. Interested in serving others.

ISFP - The Artist - Quiet, serious, sensitive and kind. Do not like conflict, and not likely to do things which may generate conflict. Loyal and faithful. Extremely well-developed senses, and aesthetic appreciation for beauty. Not interested in leading or controlling others. Flexible and open-minded. Likely to be original and creative. Enjoy the present moment.

INFJ - The Protector - Quietly forceful, original, and sensitive. Tend to stick to things until they are done. Extremely intuitive about people, and concerned for their feelings. Well-developed value systems which they strictly adhere to. Well-respected for their perserverence in doing the right thing. Likely to be individualistic, rather than leading or following.

INFP - The Idealist - Quiet, reflective, and idealistic. Interested in serving humanity. Well-developed value system, which they strive to live in accordance with. Extremely loyal. Adaptable and laid-back unless a strongly-held value is threatened. Usually talented writers. Mentally quick, and able to see possibilities. Interested in understanding and helping people.

INTJ - The Scientist - Independent, original, analytical, and determined. Have an exceptional ability to turn theories into solid plans of action. Highly value knowledge, competence, and structure. Driven to derive meaning from their visions. Long-range thinkers. Have very high standards for their performance, and the performance of others. Natural leaders, but will follow if they trust existing leaders.

INTP - The Thinker - Logical, original, creative thinkers. Can become very excited about theories and ideas. Exceptionally capable and driven to turn theories into clear understandings. Highly value knowledge, competence and logic. Quiet and reserved, hard to get to know well. Individualistic, having no interest in leading or following others.

ESTP - The Doer - Friendly, adaptable, action-oriented. “Doers” who are focused on immediate results. Living in the here-and-now, they’re risk-takers who live fast-paced lifestyles. Impatient with long explanations. Extremely loyal to their peers, but not usually respectful of laws and rules if they get in the way of getting things done. Great people skills.

ESTJ - The Guardian - Practical, traditional, and organized. Likely to be athletic. Not interested in theory or abstraction unless they see the practical application. Have clear visions of the way things should be. Loyal and hard-working. Like to be in charge. Exceptionally capable in organizing and running activities. “Good citizens” who value security and peaceful living.

ESFP - The Performer - People-oriented and fun-loving, they make things more fun for others by their enjoyment. Living for the moment, they love new experiences. They dislike theory and impersonal analysis. Interested in serving others. Likely to be the center of attention in social situations. Well-developed common sense and practical ability.

ESFJ - The Caregiver - Warm-hearted, popular, and conscientious. Tend to put the needs of others over their own needs. Feel strong sense of responsibility and duty. Value traditions and security. Interested in serving others. Need positive reinforcement to feel good about themselves. Well-developed sense of space and function.

ENFP - The Inspirer - Enthusiastic, idealistic, and creative. Able to do almost anything that interests them. Great people skills. Need to live life in accordance with their inner values. Excited by new ideas, but bored with details. Open-minded and flexible, with a broad range of interests and abilities.

ENFJ - The Giver - Popular and sensitive, with outstanding people skills. Externally focused, with real concern for how others think and feel. Usually dislike being alone. They see everything from the human angle, and dislike impersonal analysis. Very effective at managing people issues, and leading group discussions. Interested in serving others, and probably place the needs of others over their own needs.

ENTP - The Visionary - Creative, resourceful, and intellectually quick. Good at a broad range of things. Enjoy debating issues, and may be into “one-up-manship”. They get very excited about new ideas and projects, but may neglect the more routine aspects of life. Generally outspoken and assertive. They enjoy people and are stimulating company. Excellent ability to understand concepts and apply logic to find solutions.

ENTJ - The Executive - Assertive and outspoken - they are driven to lead. Excellent ability to understand difficult organizational problems and create solid solutions. Intelligent and well-informed, they usually excel at public speaking. They value knowledge and competence, and usually have little patience with inefficiency or disorganization.

Truths of the Types: What They're Doing

INFJ - is probably on the verge of breaking down because of the realization they can’t marry their favorite fictional character and they have to pick someone from this planet

INTP - is probably wearing earphones right now to avoid face to face human interaction while they lurk the world wide web and expand their collection of saved memes

ISFJ - is probably pampering themself with beauty/health products because they can’t fix themself on the inside

ISTJ - is probably trying to fix something that doesn’t need to be fixed which frustrates everyone around them

INTJ - is probably staring into space thinking about their purpose in life & thinking of ways to extend their already-long list of achievements in their resume

INFP - is probably playing videogames right now and doing much more in their character’s life, more than their own

ISTP - is probably trying their best not to be rude but still ends up hurting people by their sharp words and still doesn’t realize it

ISFP - is probably smiling and looking sensitive and innocent but is actually patiently waiting for their best friend and girlfriend to break up so they could finally make their move on them

ESFP - is probably doing something they shouldn’t be doing but does it eitherway without giving effort of hiding it and is surprised about getting caught

ESFJ - is probably writing an article to help others but is actually just writing it so they can share another one of their life stories–which no one actually cares about

ESTJ - is probably smiling on the outside acting like they like you but deep down they know they’re better than you–and if you actually are, they’ll watch your every move

ESTP - is probably thinking of ways to surprise their current romantic partner by making them sad first, just to see their reaction and be able to make them feel better later on–but fails horribly to the point that their partner almost breaks up with them

ENTP - is probably on snapchat taking random snaps of themselves with their dog to show that they’re having more fun than they actually are

ENFP - is probably being clingy with numerous people at the same time through chat, making each of them feel special but they don’t know it’s not only them

ENFJ - is probably posting inspirational quotes online & showing people motivational tips but doesn’t actually follow their own advice

ENTJ - is probably reposting articles online about why a person who is strong and independent is hard to love but are actually the best people to love


P.S. Hoping you guys like my new segment ☺ First time I’m writing about all the types! Sorry again for the hiatus, btw! Hope this post will make it up to you guys.

5 MBTI Books You Need To Read:

There’s only so much information you can get from Tumblr posts about your typology, unless you want to know what kind of candle you are. (Seriously)

For those of you who want to learn more about your type and MBTI in general, here are 5 amazing books that will get you started on your journey!

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1. Please Understand Me: Character and Temperament Types

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Does your spouse’s need to alphabetically organize books on the shelves puzzle you? Do your boss’s tsunami-like moods leave you exasperated? Do your child’s constant questions make you batty? If you’ve ever wanted to change your mate, your coworkers, or a family member, then “Put down your chisel,” advise David Keirsey and Marilyn Bates in this book of personality types. We are different for a reason, and that reason is probably more good than bad. Keirsey and Bates believe that not only is it impossible to truly change others (which they call embarking on a “Pygmalion project”), it’s much more important to understand and affirm differences. Sounds easier than it is, you might say. Well, this book is a guide for putting an end to the Pygmalion projects in your life and starting on the path to acceptance.

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2. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type

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With over twenty-five years in print and more than two hundred and fifty thousand copies sold, Gifts Differing has helped to define our understanding of personality. Written by the creators of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, this book explains the essential personality types and their practical significance in your daily life; in school, at a job, in a career, or in your personal relationships.

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3. Was That Really Me?: How Everyday Stress Brings Out Our Hidden Personality

Psychologist Naomi Quenk discusses the stress patterns that various personality types experience. Using Jungian psychological type theory and the MBTI© personality inventory, Quenk helps readers turn their moments of stress into gems of personal understanding and growth. Work-related stress and the effects of stress over time are both explored in Was That Really Me?, as is a simple explanation of type dynamics, type differentiation, and type development. Including discussions of how each of the sixteen personality types functions at work and what each finds stressful or energizing, plus new stories about people in the grip of their inferior functions, Was That Really Me? helps readers learn from moments of stress.

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4. Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type

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This fifth edition is especially useful for millennials and for baby boomers experiencing midlife career switches. The book leads readers step-by-step through the process of determining and verifying Personality Type. Then it identifies occupations that are popular with each Type, provides helpful case studies, and offers a rundown of each Type’s work-related strengths and weaknesses. Focusing on each Type’s strengths, Do What You Are uses workbook exercises to help readers customize their job search, ensuring the best results in the shortest period of time.

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5. My True Type: Clarifying Your Personality Type, Preferences & Functions

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It is hard to overstate the value and importance of knowing who you are. After all, who you understand yourself to be, your sense of self and identity, influences everything; it is the compass we use to navigate life. Your personality type is an integral part of who you are. Knowing and understanding your type can bring confidence and direction in your life’s path. But like countless others, you may be unsure of your true type, perhaps feeling “stuck in the middle” between two or three types. My True Type was carefully researched and written to address these issues. It will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to clarify and better understand your personality type, preferences, and functions. If you really want to know yourself better and gain clarity in your life, this book is for you. 

Those in the Ni-Fi camp are more psychologically minded. Many take interest in abnormal psychology, such as the study of psychopathy or various personality disorders. As mentioned in our section on Fi, they may enjoy exploring the effects of past abuse or trauma on the psyche. In this respect, their interests may overlap with those of NFPs. INTJs in this camp often test as 5w4 on the Enneagram.
— 

The Sixteen Personality Types, Dr. A.J. Drenth

This fits me as an INTJ with 5w4 for an Enneagram type.

WRITING MASTERPOST

Words and References:

  • Massive Dictionary for Writers
  • Writing a Series
  • Visual Dictionary
  • Grammar Definitions
  • Glossary of Book Terms (2)
  • Literary Terms
  • Some Words About Word Count
  • English Grammar (with Russian translation)
  • Pronunciations of Words from All Languages
  • Punctuation Guide
  • Plot Terms and Definitions

Plot & Structure:

  • Plot Development
  • Developing Events in Your Story
  • The Hero’s Journey
  • Four Essential Plot Points
  • Basic Plots in Literature
  • Ten Simple Keys to Plot Structure
  • Plot vs Exposition
  • Plot Checklist
  • Exposition in Fiction
  • Balancing Exposition
  • Easing Exposition
  • Setting or Exposition
  • 3 Rules for Writing Endings
  • Writing Powerful Endings
  • Successful Endings
  • Writing a Story Middle
  • Beginnings, Middles, and Ends (2)
  • Three Parts to Every Story

Subplots:

  • Subplots
  • 7 Ways to Add Great Subplots to your Novels
  • The 7 Shoulds of Writing a Subplot
  • Who Needs Subplots?
  • Subplots
  • Knowing Your terms: Subplots
  • Weave Subplots into your Novel
  • Understanding the Role of Subplots
  • Plot, Plot Layers, and Subplots
  • Plot and Subplot
  • Subplots - Chicken Soup for your Novel
  • How Many Subplots are Acceptable?
  • Subplots by Word Count
  • Too Many Subplots?

World Building:

  • World Building Links
  • World Building Questionnaire (2)
  • Planet Maker
  • World Building 101
  • World Building for Science Fiction
  • Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
  • The Seed of Government (2)
  • The Magic of World Building

Characters:

  • Story Guide Worksheet
  • How to Create Great Characters
  • Character Arc 101
  • “Hero” is a Four Letter Word
  • Character Questionnaire (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Character Justification
  • Conflict Can Limit Your Characters
  • Creating Characters from Plot
  • Character Bio
  • Guide to Writing a Villain
  • Eight Female Archetypes
  • Sixteen Personality Types
  • Charahub
  • Fixing Unlikable Characters
  • Offensive Mistakes Well-Intended Writers Makes (2)
  • Character Sheet
  • Morality Alignment
  • Morality Alignment Test (2) (3)
  • Creating Compelling Characters
  • Consistency is Key 
  • Desires and Conflict
  • Mary Sue Test
  • Mary Sue Villain Test
  • Writing Lycanthropy
  • Body Language (2) (3) 

Dialogue:

  • Character Conversations
  • How to Write Dialogue (2) (3) (4)
  • Speaking of Dialogue
  • Ten Tips
  • Character Dialogue
  • Believable Dialogue
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Dialogue
  • Witty Dialogue Reference Post
  • Dialogue Tips
  • Writing Really Good Dialogue
  • Writing Good Dialogue
  • Dialogue

Point of View:

  • Types of POV
  • Point of View
  • Third Person Multiple POV
  • First Person vs. Third
  • Third Person Omniscient vs. Limited
  • Using Third Person Omniscient
  • Writing Exposition in the First Person
  • Writing in First Person
  • First Person POV (2)
  • First Person or Third?
  • How to Write Winning First Person Stories

Genre:

  • Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories
  • Crime Fiction Sub Genres
  • So You Want to Write Crime Fiction
  • How to Write Crime Fiction
  • Smut Writing Guide Master List
  • Adding Sexual Tension
  • How to Write Sexual Tension
  • Literary Genres
  • Genre Index
  • 13 Horror Writing Tips
  • Classic Horror Novel Structure
  • 10 Laws of Good Science Fiction
  • Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy

Names:

  • Irish Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)
  • Irish Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Scottish Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • Scottish Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • Welsh Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Welsh Surnames (2) (3)
  • English Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • English Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Brittany Names (2)
  • Gaelic Names (2)
  • Cornish Names (2) (3) (4)
  • Cornish Surnames
  • Celtic Female Names (2) (3)
  • Celtic Male Names (2) (3)
  • Bible Names (2)
  • Find Names by Sound
  • Medieval Asian Names
  • Medieval Islamic Names
  • Medieval Names & Titles
  • Middle Eastern Names
  • North American Indian Names (2) 
  • French Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  • French Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • German Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • German Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Western African Names (2) (3)
  • Northern African Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Latin American Names (2)
  • Traditional Hispanic Last Names
  • Chinese Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Asian and Pacific Names (2)
  • African and Middle East Names
  • Italian Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Italian Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Name Generator (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (Fantasy (2) (3) (4)) (Sci-fi (2))
  • Jewish Names (2) (3) (4) (5)
  • Jewish Surnames (2) (3) (4)
  • Russian Names (2) (3) (4)
  • Russian Surnames (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Scandinavian Names (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
  • Scandinavian Surnames (2) (3)
  • Spanish Names (2)
  • Pagan Names
  • Nook of Names
  • What a Lovely Name
  • List of Names from Around the World
  • Etymology Dictionary
  • Name Playground
  • What’s in a Name?
  • 7 Rules for Picking Names
  • How to Invent Names
  • Nickname Lists (2) (3)
  • Latin Place Names
  • Name Dictionary
  • First Names Reference Database
  • Slave Trade Names Database

History:

  • 1920’s Reference Post
  • 1920’s Setting
  • History of Childbirth
  • 1920’s Slang
  • Medieval Reference Post
  • Medieval Scotland
  • All About Scotland
  • World Myths, Creatures, and Folklore
  • Knighthood and Orders of Chivalry
  • National Heraldry
  • Titles in the Elizabethan Era
  • Titles Explained
  • Peerage Basics
  • National Museum of the American Indian
  • American Indian Tribes and Languages Master List
  • Historical Resources

Query Letters:

  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • The 10 Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Query Letter
  • Anatomy of a Query Letter: A Step-By-Step Guide
  • Successful Query Letters for Literary Agents
  • Query Letter FAQ
  • Master the Art of the Query
  • Writing a Solid Query Letter
  • Writing a Query Letter that Sells
  • Dos and Don’ts: How to Write the Perfect Query Letter
  • Query Letters
  • Rachelle’s Query Tips
  • How to Query a Literary Agent
  • Query Letters
  • A Pitch is a Pitch
  • Make the Perfect Pitch: The Novel Query
  • How to Write Great Queries
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • How to Query an Agent
  • How to Write a Dynamic Query Letter
  • Writing a Good Query Letter
  • Sample Query Letter PDF
  • Sample Novel Query Letter
  • Ten Ways to Hook a Literary Agent
  • What Not to Put in Your Query Letter
  • What (Not) to Put in Your Query Letter
  • Query Letters - What, Why, How?
  • What (Not) to do Before Querying
  • What to Write in the Bio Section of your Query Letter
  • How to Write a Bio Paragraph in your Query Letter
  • The Last Paragraph of your Query Letter: the Author Bio
  • Writing the Hook for your Query
  • Query Letter Dos and Don’ts
  • Agent Reveals Pet Peeves
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • Query Letter Mad Lib
  • How to Format a Query Letter
  • 15 Reasons Agents Pass Over Query Letters
  • The Right Way to Write a Query Letter PDF
  • Query Letters
  • Writing a Query Letter
  • The Query Letter
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • How to Write a Kick-Ass Query Letter
  • How to Write a Great Query Letter PDF
  • Query Letter to Agents
  • Writing a Killer Query Letter
  • 15 Resources for a Better Query Letter
  • 25 Reasons Your Query Letter Sucks
  • Query Letters: My Personal Journey
  • How to Write a Query Letter
  • A Bit of Regurgitated Query Letter Advice
  • Query Letter Advice: Let Someone Else Write It
  • Writing a Query Letter Part One: The Hook
  • Part Two: The Setup
  • Part Three: The Conflict
  • Part Four: The Consequence
  • Part Five: Everything Else
  • The Importance of Voice
  • The Query Letter that Won Me an Agent
  • How Not to Write the Perfect Query Letter
  • FAQ The Query Letter
  • Query Letters

Editing and Revision:

  • Editing Checklist
  • List of Freelance Editors
  • Tighten Your Manuscript
  • Editing Recipe
  • 7 Editing Questions
  • How to Rewrite
  • Revising a Novel
  • Editing Tips
  • Self Editing
  • How to Edit a Novel

Software:

  • Tip of my Tongue
  • Liquid Story Binder
  • Q10
  • 25 Writing Softwares
  • Jarte**
  • AbiWord
  • Calligra
  • Celtx**
  • Open Office
  • Scrivener*
  • Final Draft*
  • Atlantis Nova
  • Zoho**
  • Lit Lift
  • Hiveword
  • Story Book**
  • Character Writer*
  • Write Room (mac only)
  • Dark Room
  • Q10
  • Liquid Story Binder*
  • Now Novel**
  • yWriter 5
  • Time Toast
  • Interactive Timeline
  • Timeline Maker*
  • Preceden
  • Tiki Toki**
  • Time Glider**
  • Timeline Maker
  • My Timeline
  • Timeline JS
  • X Timeline
  • Our Story**
  • Dipity
  • Timeline Software*
  • Timelines*
  • Meograph
  • Timeline Charts*
  • Family Echo
  • Genealogy
  • Legacy Family Tree Maker**
  • Family Tree Builder**
  • XY Family Tree
  • Bubbl
  • Cliche Finder
  • *Not free. May include free trial.
  • **Includes free and premium content.

Prompts:

  • Inspiration Finder
  • Seventh Sanctum
  • Writing Prompts Generator
  • Timeline Generator
  • Writing Prompts
  • Plinky
  • Random Story Prompts
  • Random Prompts
  • Prompt Generator (2)
  • Writing Prompts
  • 14 Prompts

Writing Websites:

  • Galley Cat
  • Writer’s Digest
  • Absolute Write
  • Advanced Fiction Writing
  • Writer Beware
  • Chuck Sambuchino
  • Nathan Bransford
  • Novel Rocket
  • 101 Best Websites for Writers

OTHER

  • Inspiration 1
  • Instead of ‘whispered’
  • Writing fantasy
  • Emotions vocab sheet
  • How to reveal character
  • Writers block resource
  • Writing a death scene
  • BIO help
  • Writing prompt generators
  • How to torture a character
  • Degrees of emotion
  • Character names
  • Body language
  • Writing people of colour
  • character flaws
ENFP Females I’ve Met (by an INFJ)

I also have an “ENFP Males I’ve Met” post. I just decided to split ENFPs into two posts because I noticed some distinct differences between the two genders. http://the-anomalous-infj.tumblr.com/post/142998214873/enfp-males-ive-met-by-an-infj 

What I noticed and observed about them: 

  1. They talk. A lot. I admire how they can talk about anything out of thin air–just to fill the awkward silence (or just for the very sake of talking). However, sometimes they just won’t stop talking. They tend to talk about a lot of different things at once, that even they forget why they were talking in the first place. It’s so amusing. (They’ll keep talking even though no one’s actively listening or paying attention to them). 
  2. If they aren’t talking, there is definitely something wrong. Sure they have their calm and quiet moments, (since they are known for getting drained quite easily for extroverts), but if their silence is accompanied with an emotionless face and cold vibes (totally different from their usual cheery disposition)–then that means they are not in the mood. This side of them will make you miss their loudness (or noisiness). 
  3. One ironic thing I observed about the two ENFP females I know are that they are not morning people. You would think that their sunny attitude would match the morning sun–but no. They are the moodiest and most negative people in the morning. It is just not the right time for them to shine (yet).   
  4. They are rarely on time. Pretty much a continuation on why they aren’t morning people. This is why an early class schedule (or them having to get ready for something early) makes things worse. Both of the ENFP females I know are constantly late to class (and would blame other things for it–such as traffic and other people). They don’t like admitting that they could have gotten out of bed earlier–and not have purposely ignored their alarm (or anyone who attempted waking them up). 
  5. However, if they are going out to see their friends or if they’re going to camp–or some other place where extroverts thrive in– then they will wake up even before the sun rises. Basically, if they’re motivated and excited, they will give their full-on effort. 
  6. They aren’t the most organized females. They prepare their things last-minute, misplace things in their own room, study right before taking their tests–yes, they live dangerously. But for some reason…they still manage to remain unstressed–which is why the same cycle goes on and on. 
  7. When they are in the mood, they are the most energetic, hyper, random, and upbeat people ever. They can easily brighten people’s day. Or well, overwhelm people with their happiness. 
  8. They are super inspiring people. They stand up for what they believe in–even if deep down they’d actually prefer peace and unity with everyone. They are the type of people who are constantly torn between doing what they want and what is right.
  9. I know that the both ENFP females I’ve met had tough childhoods. They were bullied badly for being different, had bad experiences with so-called “friends”, and were judged at a young age. They were pretty much misunderstood. 
  10. Growing up, they learned to embrace their uniqueness– and that’s why they are so good at being no one else but themselves. (I truly admire this about them–they are strong-willed people who know that the ones who don’t accept them aren’t worth their time). 
  11. They dress quirky and don’t mind looking weird or dorky. They are full of surprises. They don’t give a care about what’s “in or “out.” They will wear mismatched socks and a ‘ton of different patterns at the same time and feel like gold. 
  12. They make the corniest jokes (or memorize them) and have a whole portion of pick-up lines and memes in their brain. 
  13. They are so caring and cuddly and clingy. Even to people they had just met. Their actions are as expressive as their mouths.    
  14. They love helping people. They know exactly how it feels to be down, and they wouldn’t dare let others feel the same way. 
  15. They have several groups of friends, yet they still don’t exactly know who their true friends are. They are always on a quest on finding true friendship.
  16. They do get quiet, when they end up in a place where they feel surrounded and outnumbered by people who judge/have judged them. They feel threatened and are unable to hide it–at times. 
  17. They are emotional people. They cry after watching sad movies, happy movies, bad movies, good movies–or after finishing their favorite book. And they will always end up crying–even after reading/watching a really good book/movie a thousand times. 
  18. There are times when they would just isolate themselves– After all, outgoing people also have the urge to just laze around and be couch potatoes too. Reading books and manga, or watching Buzzfeed videos (or just random videos that don’t make sense)–are activities that they like to do during alone time (is what I noticed, at least).
  19. They don’t admit it when they need help. They do show it though. They keep complaining–yet when you offer help to them, they just give that “It’s okay” phrase. But well, they are strong enough to get through it on their own. 
  20. They can almost talk to anyone and everyone–as most extroverts can. But what makes them different is that they even have the ability to be completely civil around people who clearly dislike them.
  21. Despite being such a people-person, they rant a lot about the human race. Check their Twitter or just pay attention to what they’re saying.
  22. Their presence has a big impact. You will feel their mood, whether you want to or not. 
  23. The ENFP females I know are much more friend-oriented than family-oriented. Well–it’s because they get to choose their friends. And that’s completely understandable. 
  24. Making fun of them (such as the way they do things, wear things, or the way they talk) is a big no-no. They are sensitive people beneath their confident and lively exterior. They need as much light as they give us.

Well guys, what do you think? :)  Agree or disagree?

things i associate with the mbti
  • enfp: constantly clicking through their own photos on facebook while imagining they were various acquaintances and/or celebrities reacting to them for the first time.
  • enfj: grinding on a former student at the club
  • infj: rewearing underwear inside-out to save water and protect the environment
  • infp: repeatedly apologizing for objectifying you during sex
  • intp: getting suspended as a kid for drawing a detailed map of their elementary school and showing how they would bomb it, solely as a creative exercise.
  • intj: actually bombing the school
  • entj: telling people that their favorite 'computer game' is microsoft excel
  • entp: picking all the locks in the host's house as a party trick every time they get drunk
  • estp: getting naked on space mountain at disney world, without removing their safety harness.
  • esfp: having a $700,000 wedding solely for the purpose of trying to make viral videos
  • isfp: getting out of the car on the highway to rescue a baby turtle
  • istp: having a tramp stamp of the entire periodic table
  • istj: being unaware that all of their acquaintances secretly fear that they're a robot with artificial intelligence, thinly disguised as a human.
  • isfj: using feng shui in the dentist's waiting room
  • esfj: being a little too reluctant to hand back friends' babies
  • estj: having been acquitted of murder, despite openly admitting to being a murderer
10

myers-briggs personality types

↳ INTJ (The Mastermind)

INTJs are one of the rarest of the sixteen personality types, and account for approximately 1-2% of the population.

Hallmarks of the INTJ include independence of thought and a desire for efficiency. They work best when given autonomy and creative freedom. They harbor an innate desire to express themselves by conceptualizing their own intellectual designs. They have a talent for analyzing and formulating complex theories. INTJs are generally well-suited for occupations within academia, research, consulting, management, science, engineering, and law. They are often acutely aware of their own knowledge and abilities—as well as their limitations and what they don't know (a quality that tends to distinguish them from INTPs). INTJs thus develop a strong confidence in their ability and talents, making them natural leaders.

In forming relationships, INTJs tend to seek out others with similar character traits and ideologies. Agreement on theoretical concepts is an important aspect of their relationships. By nature INTJs can be demanding in their expectations, and approach relationships in a rational manner. As a result, INTJs may not always respond to a spontaneous infatuation but wait for a mate who better fits their set criteria. They tend to be stable, reliable, and dedicated. Harmony in relationships and home life tends to be extremely important to them. They generally withhold strong emotion and do not like to waste time with what they consider irrational social rituals. This may cause non-INTJs to perceive them as distant and reserved; nevertheless, INTJs are usually very loyal partners who are prepared to commit smallstantial energy and time into a relationship to make it work.

Trivia:

  • the third rarest type in the population; the most rare among women
  • among types least likely to suffer from heart disease and hypertension
  • least likely of all types to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • one of two types with the highest college GPA
  • among types with the highest income
  • of all types, least likely to state that they value home/family, financial security, relationships & friendships, and community service
  • Over represented among MBA students and female small business owners
  • Commonly found in scientific or technical fields, computer occupations, and legal professions
  • famous intjs: hillary clinton, isaac newton, dwight eisenhower, and lewis carroll

This is a censored version of madisonsmagazine’s fantastic writing masterlist! I claim absolutely no credit for this wonderful list of resources! (I also hold no responsibility for any offensive material on any outgoing links).

Cool Other Masterposts:

  • Writing Specific Characters
  • Writing References
  • Writing Masterpost
  • Character Guides
  • Writing Help for Writers
  • Ultimate Writing Resource List
  • Lots of RP Guides
  • Online Writing Resources
  • List of Websites to Help You Focus
  • Resources for Writing Bio’s
  • Helpful Links for Writing Help
  • General Writing Resources
  • Resources for Biography Writing
  • Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
  • 8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  • The Ultimate Writing Masterpost

General:

  • The Official Ten-Step Guide to Becoming the Next Gatsby
  • The Periodic Table of Storytelling
  • Joss Whedon’s Top 10 Writing Tips
  • Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone
  • 34 Writing Tips that will make you a Better Writer
  • 50 Free resources that will improve your writing skills
  • 5 ways to get out of the comfort zone and become a stronger writer
  • 10 ways to avoid Writing Insecurity
  • The Writer’s Guide to Overcoming Insecurity
  • The Difference Between Good Writers and Bad Writers
  • You’re Not Hemingway - Developing Your Own Style
  • 7 Ways to use Brain Science to Hook Readers and Reel them In
  • 8 Short Story Tips from Kurt Vonnegut
  • How to Show, Not Tell
  • 5 Essential Story Ingredients
  • How to Write Fiction that grabs your readers from page one
  • Why research is important in writing
  • Make Your Reader Root for Your Main Character
  • Writing Ergonomics (Staying Comfortable Whilst Writing)
  • The Importance of Body Language
  • Fashion Terminology
  • All About Kissing
  • Genre Help: Romance
  • 187 Mental Illnesses
  • Types of Mental Illness
  • Eye Color List
  • Spectral Groupings
  • Do you have trouble creating your titles?
  • On being a co-writer || Additional tips on effective co-writing
  • The length of a chapter
  • How to deal with too many story ideas
  • On writing two stories simultaneously || a similar ask
  • When a story stops working
  • Copyright
  • Reading critically for writers
  • The question of outlining
  • Avoiding publishing scams
  • Finding story ideas
  • Tips on building a platform [guest blog]
  • How much does writing “in genre” matter?
  • What a “real writer” is
  • Pennames and aliases
  • A series of thoughts on series titles
  • The self-pub miniseries: the why
  • The self-pub miniseries: the what
  • Rewriting fanfiction into original fiction
  • Formatting long quotes and songs

Characters:

  • 10 days of Character Building
  • Name Generators
  • Name Playground
  • Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test
  • Seven Common Character Types
  • Handling a Cast of Thousands Part 1 - Getting To Know Your Characters
  • Web Resources for Developing Characters
  • Building Fictional Characters
  • Fiction Writer’s Character Chart
  • Body Language Cheat
  • Body Language Reference Cheat
  • Tips for Writers: Body Language
  • Types of Crying
  • Body Language: Mirroring
  • Character Building Workshop
  • Tips for Characterization
  • Character Chart for Fiction Writers
  • Villains are people too but…
  • How to Write a Character Bible
  • Character Development Exercises
  • All Your Characters Talk the Same - And They’re Not A Hivemind!
  • Medieval Names Archive
  • Sympathy Without Saintliness
  • Family Echo (Family Tree Maker)
  • Behind The Name
  • 100 Character Development Questions for Writers
  • Aether’s Character Development Worksheet
  • The 12 Common Archetypes
  • Six Types of Courageous Characters
  • Kazza’s List of Character Secrets - Part 1, Part 2
  • Creating Believable Characters With Personality
  • Angry
  • Bad A**es
  • Childishness
  • Emotional Detachment
  • Flirtatious
  • The Girl Next Door
  • Introverts (2)
  • Mean Persons (2)
  • Psychopaths
  • Party Girls
  • Rich (2)
  • Rebels
  • Sarcasm
  • Serial Killers (2)
  • Shyness (2, 3)
  • Villains (2)
  • Witt
  • Body Language Cheat Sheet
  • Creating Fictional Characters Series
  • Three Ways to Avoid Lazy Character Description
  • 7 Rules for Picking Names for Fictional Characters
  • Character Development Questionnaire
  • How to Create Fictional Characters
  • Character Name Resources
  • Character Development Template
  • Character Development Through Hobbies
  • Character Flaws List
  • 10 Questions for Creating Believable Characters
  • Ari’s Archetype Series
  • How to Craft Compelling Characters
  • List of 200 Character Traits
  • Writing Characters of the Opposite Sex
  • Making Your Characters Likable
  • Do you really know your characters?
  • Character Development: Virtues
  • Character Development: Vices
  • Character Morality Alignment
  • List of Negative Personality Traits
  • List of Positive Personality Traits
  • List of Emotions - Positive
  • List of Emotions - Negative
  • Loon’s Character Development Series - Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
  • Phobia List A-L (Part 1), M-Z (Part 2)
  • 30 Day In Depth Character Development Meme
  • Words for Emotions based on Severity
  • Eight Bad Characters
  • High Level Description of the Sixteen Personality Types
  • How Not to Write Female Characters
  • Writing Female Characters
  • How to write empowering female characters
  • Why I write strong female characters
  • Red Flags for Female Characters Written by Men
  • Writing strong female characters
  • The Female Character Flowchart
  • Eight Heroine Archetypes
  • Eight Hero Archetypes
  • Help on picking character names
  • A tip about realistic characters
  • Strategies to create believable characters
  • Additional tips on writing PoC characters
  • Advice on writing genders
  • Creating unstable characters
  • Ambiguous Antagonists
  • A tidbit on psychological trauma [trigger warnings]
  • On writing accents
  • What makes characters stick with me
  • Sweetening up character description
  • Making an introverted character stand out
  • Conveying too much or too little character “inner reflection”
  • Revealing a character’s asexual orientation
  • Revealing a character’s gender & orientation
  • A habit of killing characters
  • When characters aren’t standing out
  • Breaking hearts with character deaths
  • Quick tips on expressing character
  • Character development versus pacing
  • A mini guide to character voice
  • A Description Resource
  • 55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
  • Describing Skin Colors
  • Describing a Person: Adding Details
  • Emotions Vocabulary
  • 90 Words For ‘Looks’
  • Be More Descriptive
  • Describe a Character’s Look Well
  • 100 Words for Facial Expressions
  • To Show and Not To Tell
  • Words to Describe Facial Expressions
  • Describing Clothes
  • List of Actions
  • Tone, Feelings and Emotions
  • Writing A Vampire
  • Writing Pansexual Characters
  • Writing Characters on the Police Force
  • Writing Drunk Characters
  • Writing A Manipulative Character
  • Writing A Friends With Benefits Relationship
  • Writing A Natural Born Leader
  • Writing A Flirtatious Character
  • Writing A Nice Character
  • Fiction Writing Exercises for Creating Villains
  • Five Traits to Contribute to an Epic Villain
  • Writing Villains that Rock
  • Writing British Characters
  • How To Write A Character With A Baby
  • On Assassin Characters
  • Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder
  • Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Avoidant Personality Disorder
  • Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
  • Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
  • Cotard Delusions
  • Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)  
  • Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
  • Facitious Disorders
  • Histrionic Personality Disorder
  • Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
  • Narcissistic Personality Disorder
  • Night Terrors
  • Kleptomania (2)
  • A Pyromaniac
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Psychopaths
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2) (3)
  • Schizophrenia (2)
  • Sociopaths (2)
  • Aspergers Syndrome
  • Apathy
  • Autism
  • Someone Blind (2)
  • Cancer (2, 3)
  • Disability
  • Dyslexia
  • Muteness (2, 3)
  • Stutter
  • Actors
  • Ballet Dancer (2)
  • Christianity
  • Foreigners
  • Gamblers
  • Hinduism
  • Hitmen
  • Satanism
  • Smokers
  • Stoners
  • Taoism
  • Journalists
  • Vegetarians
  • Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Cocaine Influence
  • Ecstasy Influence (2)
  • Heroin Use
  • LSD Influence
  • Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
  • Opiate Use

Tips on Writing Dialogue:

  • It’s Not What They Say…
  • Top 8 Tips for Writing Dialogue
  • Speaking of Dialogue
  • The Great Said Debate
  • He Said, She Said, Who Said What?
  • How to Write Dialogue Unique to Your Characters
  • Writing Dialogue: Go for Realistic, Not Real-Life

Tips on Writing Point of View:

  • Establishing The Right Point of View
  • How to Start Writing in the Third Person
  • The I Problem

Style & Craft of Writing:

  • The literary “weak verb”
  • Do you have word tics?
  • Victoria’s Vitamins: vague descriptive words
  • Victoria’s Vitamins: mood
  • Breaking writing habits
  • Varying sentences
  • Describing colors
  • Sweetening up character description
  • Purple prose
  • Grammar is a tricksy thing
  • “Smartening” the language of your narrative
  • Building suspense and making readers sweat
  • A couple tips about description in fast-paced scenes

Content:

  • The story of exposition
  • 10 ways to hit your reader in the gut
  • Make your reader root for your main character
  • Make your reader hold their breath
  • What’s the big deal about intros?
  • A tip about description
  • The word count of your manuscript
  • Things that make me keep reading
  • Choosing ideas and endings
  • When to describe setting
  • Battling cliches
  • Is your story YA, NA, or adult?
  • When a plot isn’t strong enough to make a whole story
  • Flashbacks with multiple POVs
  • Bulking up your word count
  • Avoiding cliches
  • Conquer that opening line || response || discussion
  • Tips on revealing setting awesomely kind of
  • Deciding between different ideas for the same story

Revision:

  • You’ve finished your manuscript! Now what?
  • Revision sucks but doesn’t have to suck
  • Where to find beta readers/critique partners
  • Tips on taking critique
  • Tips on giving critique
  • What to do with bad writing advice
  • Additional insight on bad writing advice
  • Five quick steps to get into revising that manuscript
  • When to say you’re done revising
  • Beginning the awesome journey of revision
  • Friends are not always the best readers

Plot, Structure, & Outline:

  • Writing A Novel Using the Snowflake Method
  • Effectively Outlining Your Novel
  • Conflict and Character Within Story Structure
  • Outlining Your Plot
  • Ideas, Plots and Using the Premise Sheets
  • How To Write A Novel
  • Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense
  • Plunge Right In…Into Your Story, That Is
  • Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot
  • 36 (plus one) Dramatic Situations
  • The Evil Overlord Devises A Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plot Tricks
  • Conflict Test
  • What is Conflict?
  • Monomyth
  • The Hero’s Journey: Summary of Steps
  • Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes
  • Plotting Without Fears
  • Novel Outlining 101
  • Writing The Perfect Scene
  • One-Page Plotting
  • The Great Swampy Middle
  • How Can You Know What Belongs In Your Book?
  • Create A Plot Outline in 8 Easy Steps
  • How to Organize and Develop Ideas for Your Novel
  • Create Structure in your novel using index cards
  • Choosing the best outline method for you
  • Hatch’s Plot Bank

Setting & Making Your Own World

  • Magical Word Builder’s Guide
  • I Love The End Of The World
  • World Building 101
  • The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help Bring Your Settings to Life
  • Creating the Perfect Setting - Part 1
  • Creating a Believable World
  • Setting
  • Character and Setting Interactions
  • Maps Workshop - Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping
  • World Builders Project
  • How To Create Fantasy Worlds
  • Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds

Helpful Tools & Software:

  • Tip Of My Tongue - Find the word you’re looking for
  • Write or Die - Stay motivated
  • Stay Focused - Tool for Chrome, lock yourself out of distracting websites
  • My Writing Nook - Online Text Editor, Free
  • Bubbl.us - Online Mind Map Application, Free
  • Family Echo - Online Family Tree Maker, Free
  • Freemind - Mind Map Application; Free; Windows, Mac, Linux, Portable
  • Xmind - Mind Map Application; Free; Windows, Mac, Linux, Portable
  • Liquid Story Binder - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $45.95; Windows, Portable
  • Scrivener - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $39.95; Mac
  • SuperNotecard - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable
  • yWriter - Novel Organization and Writing Application; free; Windows, Linux, portable
  • JDarkRoom - Minimalist Text Editing Application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable
  • AutoRealm - Map Creation Application; free; Windows, Linux with Wine

Grammer & Revision:

  • How To Rewrite
  • Editing Recipe
  • Cliche Finder
  • Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written
  • Writing 101: Revising A Novel
  • 20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes
  • Synonyms for the Most Commonly Used Words of the English Language
  • Grammar Urban Legends
  • Words Instead of Walk (2)
  • Commonly Confused Adjectives
  • A Guide on Punctuation
  • Common Writing Mistakes
  • 25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
  • How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
  • Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
  • The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
  • Other Ways to Say..
  • Proofreading
  • 300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
  • List of Misused Words
  • 100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
  • Words to Use More Often
  • Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
  • Three Self Editing Tips
  • Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
  • Synonyms for Common Words
  • Alternatives for ‘Smile’
  • Transitional Words
  • The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
  • Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
  • A Case Of She Said, She Said

Creativity Boosters:

  • *Creative Writing Prompts
  • *Ink Provoking
  • *Story Starter
  • *Story Spinner
  • *Story Kitchen
  • *Language is a Virus
  • *The Dabbling Mum
  • Quick Story Idea Generator
  • Solve Your Problems By Simply Saying Them Out Loud
  • Busting Your Writing Rut
  • Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips To Engineer A Productive Flow
  • The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes
  • Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits
  • Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging
  • Random Book Title Generator
  • Finishing Your Novel
  • Story Starters & Idea Generators
  • Words to Use More Often
  • How to: Cure Writer’s Block
  • Some Tips on Writer’s Block
  • Got Writer’s Block?
  • 6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
  • Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block

Improvement:

  • Improve Your Writing Habits Now
  • 5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
  • Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
  • Improve Your Paras
  • Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
  • 4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
  • Writing Better Than You Normally Do
  • How’s My Driving?

Motivation:

  • Backhanding procrastination
  • On habits and taking care of yourself || Response
  • More troubles with writing motivation
  • The inner critic and ways to fight it
  • The writing life is hard on us
  • For troubles with starting your story
  • Writing to be published
  • “You’re a writer, will you write this for me?”
  • Writing a story that’s doomed to suck
  • Writing stamina builds slowly
  • When depression goes and writing goes with it
  • Additional inner critic strategies
  • Tips on conquering NaNoWriMo (or any project, really)
  • You will change as a writer
  • Ways to keep writing while in school
  • 13 quick tips when you’re starting your novel
  • First draft blues
  • Getting in your own way

Writing an Application:

  • How to: Make Your App Better
  • How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
  • 10 Tips for Applying
  • Para Sample Ideas
  • 5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
  • Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
  • How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
  • How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
  • How to: Lengthen Short Para’s

Prompts:

  • Drabble Stuff
  • Prompts List
  • Writing Prompts
  • Drabble Prompts
  • How to Get Into Character
  • Writing Challenges/Prompts
  • A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
  • Para Prompts & Ideas
  • Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
  • A List of Para Starters
INFJs I’ve Met (by an INFJ)

What I noticed and observed about them: 

  1. Most of the INFJ females I know–including me–tend to post deep, motivational, and inspirational quotes on their Facebook. It’s as if their profile is a feel-good page. It’s their way of reminding themselves to be positive and to understand things. However–if they’re going through bad times–be prepared to see a lot of emotional and heartbreaking posts.
  2. When I first met some of them, they seemed really outgoing and approachable. Super easy to talk to. Then later on I realized that they’re actually quiet individuals when they’re relaxed. This is often misunderstood by other people because of the abrupt change of behavior–making them think that they aren’t okay. But really, they’re just…like that. 
  3. They could be the friendliest people, yet the most distant. It’s confusing, really. But all you have to do is show that you care and be there most of the time. Then they’ll eventually open up. 
  4. They are so so so socially selective. When I’d see them talk with their close friends, they can seem so extroverted because of how loud they get. But you can only “unlock” this side of theirs if they feel comfortable enough around you (usual introvert thing). 
  5. The females INFJs I know (including me, I have to admit) are brutally honest but SO on-point that it hurts and can rip your heart out but…they say what you need to hear. It’s their way of helping people out. (their Judging aspect) 
  6. The male INFJs seem to be too nice at first, but it’ll fade away once you prove to them that you are not worthy. Once you reach their limits, they will be the coldest people ever–and it is the scariest thing ever.
  7. Some of the INFJs I know tend to stay in toxic relationships. After all, they’re known to be the “counselors” or “protectors” of the MBTI (similar to ENFJs). They see people as projects and they get confidence from helping others out–as if it’s their cry for help for someone to maybe…help them. (Which is impossible since INFJs know deep down that only they can help themselves. They’re very independent in that sense)  
  8. A continuation of the one above– they want to save everyone but can’t save themselves. I personally had experiences where I helped people several times and acted like their “life coach” when in reality, I, too–needed help as well. 

P.S. Finally got to update after 7 months!! I’ve been so busy with school… but now it’s Christmas break, so I can make some time for this :) 

I will be replying to your messages~ And I don’t think I’ll be continuing aesthetics–since I don’t want this to turn into another MBTI Aesthetic blog, so yeah, sorry guys! 

The Definition Of Hell For Each Myers-Briggs Personality Type

They say that one man’s heaven is another man’s hell and that couldn’t be truer when it comes to the sixteen Myers-Briggs Personality Types. Each one is inspired, enraged and absolutely tortured by something slightly different. Here’s the destiny that would psychologically destroy each Myers-Briggs Personality type.

ESTJ – An incredibly impractical person is put in charge of all of your major life decisions. You have to do whatever they say and are powerless to argue or reason with them.

INFP – Your deepest thoughts and feelings are exposed to a large audience and everyone thinks that you’re pathetic and unoriginal.

INTJ – Every time you open your mouth to say something intelligent, something entirely idiotic comes out instead.

ESFJ – Someone you love is in dire need of practical help and you can’t give it to them. Worse yet, they think you’re refusing to help them out of pettiness and they’re mad at you.

ESFP – You are stuck in a room by yourself for the rest of eternity.

ISTP – The Zombie apocalypse happens but you’re suddenly the world’s weakest fighter and must depend solely on your loved ones to keep you alive.

ENFP – Every minute of the rest of your life has been scheduled for you – and it’s a long series of arbitrary, solitary tasks.

ISFP – You have to listen to rude people criticizing your personal choices, your appearance and your art form all day long. Nobody cares that they’re hurting your feelings.

ENFJ – Your loved ones are in dire need of guidance but every piece of advice you gives them inadvertently makes things worse for them.

ISFJ – Everyone you love is yelling at each other and it’s all your fault.

ISTJ – You are expected to complete a highly esteemed project with absolutely no guidance as to what’s expected of you.

INFJ – You are eternally damned to working for a morally corrupt company that aims to exploit the weak and generally degrade conditions for all of society.

ESTP – You are completely paralyzed, lacking even the ability to speak.

ENTP – Freedom of speech is revoked from the constitution. Voicing your opinion in any way is now illegal.

INTP – You are eternally condemned to researching an extremely vapid topic using wildly inaccurate methods, mostly involving interviewing people who have no idea what they’re talking about.

ENTJ – Somebody is wrong, and they’re directing a large group of people! You can’t do anything about it and will have to obey whatever inefficient policies they decide to implement.

INTPs I’ve Met (by an INFJ)

What I noticed and observed about them: 

  1. They are super quiet at first but still have this approachable aura because they look harmless. 
  2. They tend to be pushed and dragged around by others because they are just that easy to “boss around”–not because they are weak; but because they are flexible enough to be around most types of people. 
  3. They are good company–even if they’re naturally quiet, they always have something interesting and random to say.
  4. They have such good humor if you’re the open-minded type. But even if you’re not open-minded, there is still something to laugh about them. They’re just that funny. And silly.
  5. They are actually very touchy– they tend to tap and pat people. And do other touchy-feely things that you wouldn’t really expect (from them).   
  6. They are gentlemen. Even the girls are. They know their manners and that’s what makes them charming. 
  7. When they’re quiet–it doesn’t mean they necessarily feel out of place or that they’re overthinking about something deep. They’re most likely thinking about something simple, (which isn’t simple to them), such as the last TV show they watched or a new piece of information that they had just recently discovered. 
  8. They can stay home the whole day and be okay–as long as they’re doing something stimulating; such as reading, playing video games, and using electronic devices. They’re fine being alone
  9. There are times when they are the most monotonous people ever. But when they’re comfortable around you, they become the most animated people ever–randomly saying movie line phrases aloud or even suddenly sharing their feelings. Yes, they have feelings. Although their feelings don’t usually revolve around real people–they get emotional when it comes to fictional characters though. 
  10. They don’t seem very into relationships…they’re independent people. 
  11. They get drained by big crowds, strangers, and just people in general–real easily. Which is why they always bring a set of earphones. 
  12. If they’re effortlessly smart–even without being organized–that’s a common trait of an INTP. The ones I’ve met aren’t necessarily the ones who receive super high grades, but they are very informational about all kinds of things. Probably ‘cause they read a lot. 

Well, what do you guys think? :) Agree or disagree? 

My Advice to the Sixteen Personalties

•ISTJ- Try something new, it might work.
•ISFJ- Spend some more on yourself; you deserve it.
•INFJ- Don’t be afraid to tell others how you feel.
•INTJ- It’s okay to fail because you can learn from your mistakes.
•ISTP- Use your natural gift to help others.
•ISFP- Make sure the people who you care about care about you.
•INFP- Make sure to share your creative ideas with others.
•INTP- Don’t be afraid to talk to someone new; they might be your best friend.
•ESTP- Sometimes it’s okay to have your head up in the clouds.
•ESFP- Join a hands-on activity like sports, clubs, etc.
•ENFP- Even though it’s good to think about the future, sometimes it’s better to live in the present.
•ENTP- If something’s not broke, don’t feel the need to change it.
•ESTJ- Stop and think about how others feel.
•ESFJ- Don’t let just anyone in your life.
•ENFJ- Find an outlet that works for you.
•ENTJ- Not everything needs to be planned.