situla

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Urartian Silver Pectoral, c. 7th Century BC

The pectoral is decorated with sirens walking in profile, five in the upper register and seven in the lower, interspersed with palmettes (possibly representing a sacred tree), each frieze with a raised band above and below, the panel bordered above and below with a punched double-triangle motif, the curved panels and each end decorated with a profile figure of a winged genius (benevolent spirit) in the ‘Knielauf’ (kneeling-running) position, each holding a situla (a bucket-like vessel associated with purification rituals in and around the ancient Mesopotamian region).

The region of Urartu (map) corresponds to the mountainous plateau between Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, and the Caucasus mountains, later known as the Armenian Highlands. The Urartian Kingdom rose to power in the mid-9th century BC, but was conquered by Media in the early 6th century BC. The heirs of Urartu are the Armenians and their successive kingdoms. Urartu is cognate with the Biblical Ararat

Situlae were vessels used to pour offerings of milk or water in purification rituals. They take the form of a human breast and were associated with the goddess Isis. Situlae were found in temple treasuries at Amarna, the city built by the pharaoh Akhenaten to honor Aten, the sun-disk deity. This vessel continued to be used after the demise of Akhenaten and the king’s birth name has been erased. It has a central field containing three columns of inscription executed in dark blue glaze.

VITA E MORTE DI UNA SITULA

VITA E MORTE DI UNA SITULA

VITA E MORTE DI UNA SITULA

di Piero Valdiserra

La cronaca, innanzitutto. In occasione della XXVII edizione della “Rassegna Vini Müller Thurgau”, recentemente tenutasi a Cembra (TN), è stata nuovamente esposta al pubblico la celebre situla cembrana, il prezioso contenitore in bronzo del IV secolo a.C. considerato ormai un’icona dell’antica cultura trentina del vino. Rinvenuta in Val di Cembra nel…

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