sino soviet split

rapprochement

Summary: Alfred thinks he’s figured out the perfect way to put the squeeze on Ivan in the wake of the Sino-Soviet split. By making nice with Yao—what else? Because ‘the enemy of my enemy is my friend’ is tried and tested and completely foolproof, you bet.

Or: In which the world’s youngest empire has a conversation with one of the oldest. 

Notes: historical!hetalia. basically- the backdrop of Nixon Goes to China, and the Sino-Soviet split. not really shippyish, more like hard-nosed ‘what’s in it for me’ talk. takes place in the same continuity as the boy king.


1972, Beijing 

“Shit- I don’t get you at all—just think how much money you’d rake in from the tourists if you went and stopped being a hermit and threw your doors open tomorrow.”

And he wasn’t even being hyperbolic. The view was amazing; the way the ancient fortifications snaked across the undulating hills and mountains, a great stone dragon dozing amidst the snow-speckled landscape for miles and miles and miles—

“You have quite the one track mind,” Yao observes drily, “And you are very…cheerful today.”

Alfred grins broadly. He is in a good mood, and it’s not just the fine weather, or the boisterous atmosphere from the gaggle of reporters, government aides and other hangers-on around them.

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darmokontheocean replied to your post “i voiced my extreme discomfort over gulag jokes (and by extension, how…”

I really appreciate the phase “unprincipled peace.”

i’m pretty sure it comes from mao? or like, even if mao didn’t use it himself, maoists use it a lot, referring to the kind of thing Mao criticises in Combat Liberalism.

i realise there’s some irony referring to Mao when arguing about Stalin in this way, given Maoists generally uphold Stalin’s period as the relatively good part of Soviet history before the Sino-Soviet split happened and the Soviet Union became, as they term it, social-imperialist.

you, a second day communist kid:

you, a first day communist kid: lacks knowledge of the Sino-Soviet split’s importance

me, an intellectual: knows it’s importance and therefore follows the immutable revolutionary science of [something outdated, unimportant, and LARPy]

me, an intellectual: possess knowledge that the Sino-Soviet split is utterly irrelevant to the struggles of the working class today