sincecombahee

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Black, Feminist, Revolutionary Remembering the Combahee River Collective

“Our politics initially sprang from the shared belief that Black women are inherently valuable, that our liberation is a necessity not as an adjunct to somebody else’s may because of our need as human persons for autonomy. This may seem so obvious as to sound simplistic, but it is apparent that no other ostensibly progressive movement has ever consIdered our specific oppression as a priority or worked seriously for the ending of that oppression. Merely naming the pejorative stereotypes attributed to Black women (e.g. mammy, matriarch, Sapphire, whore, bulldagger), let alone cataloguing the cruel, often murderous, treatment we receive, indicates how little value has been placed upon our lives during four centuries of bondage in the Western hemisphere. We realize that the only people who care enough about us to work consistently for our liberation are us. Our politics evolve from a healthy love for ourselves, our sisters and our community which allows us to continue our struggle and work.

This focusing upon our own oppression is embodied in the concept of identity politics. We believe that the most profound and potentially most radical politics come directly out of our own identity, as opposed to working to end somebody else’s oppression. In the case of Black women this is a particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at all the political movements that have preceded us that anyone is more worthy of liberation than ourselves. We reject pedestals, queenhood, and walking ten paces behind. To be recognized as human, levelly human, is enough”.

~ Combahee River Collective

Remembering the #CombaheeRiverCollective #BarbaraSmith: challenging the marginalization of Black women from other civil rights movements; reflecting on40th anniversary of its founding @EbonyMag @Sincecombahee

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Fracking is a destructive process of extracting oil and gas from deep underground by fracturing layers of rock with a high-pressure blast of toxic chemicals, water and sand. Why is fracking so bad? The dangers are proven:

  • Fracking pollutes — a lot! It wastes millions of gallons of water, releases toxic fumes and leaves behind pools of radioactive wastewater that can’t be transported or disposed of safely. Even worse, oil and gas companies aren’t required to disclose the chemicals they use, but we know that fracking fluid includes carcinogens and endocrine disruptors — seriously nasty stuff.

  • Fracking hurts communities. We’re hearing more and more stories about families getting sick when they live near fracking wells. Often, fracked communities can no longer even drink the local water — instead, they rely on water that’s trucked in by the very companies that poisoned their groundwater.

  • Fracking affects everyone, no matter where you live, because water doesn’t stay put. Contaminated water and fracking waste are a serious threat to our precious, limited supply of fresh water on this planet. The same goes for air pollution caused by fracking.

  • Fracking worsens climate change. The methane released from fracking wells can be even more damaging to our climate than burning coal.

Tell your members of Congress to ban fracking now.