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If you’re reading this, you more than likely appreciate well-made products; and you understand that you get what you pay for. Back in the good ol’ days, the hard-working men & women who built our cities from the ground up, made our railroads go on for thousands of miles, and made America what it is today understood that concept as well. They were willing to pay for a boot or shoe that would last more than a single season, and understood that you do indeed get what you pay for. Workers used to count on their boots to last them for awhile, and thanks to the Goodyear welt – this was the case. Putting welts on shoes was around long before the Goodyear welt, but it was an extremely long process that was done with hand-stitching and abandoned due to the time it took. Fast forward to 1869 – machinery was invented to speed up the process of welting a shoe by Charles Goodyear, Jr – the son of Charles Goodyear (you know, the guy who revolutionzed the process to vulcanize rubber and what not.) This dramatically shortened the time it took to apply a welt to a shoe, and earned it the title: Goodyear welt.

“A welt is a strip of leather, rubber, or plastic that is stitched to the upper and insole of a shoe, as an attach-point for the sole. The space enclosed by the welt is then filled with cork or some other filler material (usually either porous or perforated, for breathability), and the outsole is both cemented and stitched to the welt.” Wikipedia

With the use of a welt, the shoe becomes resoleable – since the outsole can be removed from the welt and replaced with a new one. As long as the uppers of a shoe or boot are intact, it can be resoled over & over again. A welt also protects water from getting in through the outsole – so you’re getting another layer of protection from the elements. It’s just another reason why it is worth paying good money up front for a nice pair of boots that can be resoled for the years to come.


 

If you’re reading this, you more than likely appreciate well-made products; and you understand that you get what you pay for. Back in the good ol’ days, the hard-working men & women who built our cities from the ground up, made our railroads go on for thousands of miles, and made America what it is today understood that concept as well. They were willing to pay for a boot or shoe that would last more than a single season, and understood that you do indeed get what you pay for. Workers used to count on their boots to last them for awhile, and thanks to the Goodyear welt – this was the case. Putting welts on shoes was around long before the Goodyear welt, but it was an extremely long process that was done with hand-stitching and abandoned due to the time it took. Fast forward to 1869 – machinery was invented to speed up the process of welting a shoe by Charles Goodyear, Jr – the son of Charles Goodyear (you know, the guy who revolutionzed the process to vulcanize rubber and what not.) This dramatically shortened the time it took to apply a welt to a shoe, and earned it the title: Goodyear welt.

“A welt is a strip of leather, rubber, or plastic that is stitched to the upper and insole of a shoe, as an attach-point for the sole. The space enclosed by the welt is then filled with cork or some other filler material (usually either porous or perforated, for breathability), and the outsole is both cemented and stitched to the welt.” Wikipedia

With the use of a welt, the shoe becomes resoleable – since the outsole can be removed from the welt and replaced with a new one. As long as the uppers of a shoe or boot are intact, it can be resoled over & over again. A welt also protects water from getting in through the outsole – so you’re getting another layer of protection from the elements. It’s just another reason why it is worth paying good money up front for a nice pair of boots that can be resoled for the years to come.