simple arithmetic problems

Is it possible to be INFP but to have developed intellectual Ti sort of functions (like analysis etc) by spending lots of time with a Ti user and learning to think that way? I think I’m INFP, but I don’t relate much to the emotional awareness aspect, and I think my close sister is INTP and that I could have learned critical analysis of things that interest me from her. However, I definitely think I have more sympathy and empathy than INTPs tend to have, like often if people are talking and I think they’re wrong, I’m content to just sit there and think how silly they are instead of telling them how dumb they are, which apparently is an INTP trait.

Also, additionally, I took that INTP vs INFP test which I didn’t really like? Because the INTP answers were the RIGHT answers which I learned in college whereas INFP were very individual based to the point of flaw. I felt like it was similar to “What is 2+2!?” And the INTP answer would be “Uh, 4.” And the INFP answer would be “You can’t define what 2+2 is, let them be individuals!”

Anyway, these are just my thoughts… What is a logical, not extremely emotional INFP like? Thanks!

- @win-chan

I’m not quite sure what you’re asking here. If you’re asking whether INFP can develop Ti, then no - that would be make them not INFP. If you’re asking whether INFP’s existing functions can mimic Ti, then I suppose it’s possible to an outside viewer for an INFP to resemble an INTP. Learning to think a certain way is not the same as utilizing cognitive functions; rather, cognitive functions should be viewed as tendencies, and developing new skills would be better described as finding how to use those tendencies in the most beneficial way.

Additionally, INFP isn’t exactly lacking in analytical skill. You might think of INFPs and INTPs both as primarily seeking to analyze, albeit in different ways. You have INFP’s individualized and complex moral scale, and you have INTP’s individualized and complex logical system. I imagine you and your sister both like to tackle problems that exercise your dominant function, but you might approach it from a good vs bad angle, whereas she might approach it from a true vs false angle.

The emotional awareness aspect is also somewhat misleading; Fi by nature isn’t good at monitoring and maintaining others’ emotions - it’s introverted, meaning it’s highly aware of internal emotions. Fi can be very good at identifying with people and making them feel welcome, but this usually stems from knowing where that person is coming from or feeling a connection before they act.

I’m content to just sit there and think how silly they are instead of telling them how dumb they are, which apparently is an INTP trait.

INTP does seek to clarify and ‘bring truth to light,’ so to speak, but an INTP with developed Fe probably won’t speak out either. It depends on the situation and the person, not to mention how important it is that they correct the misinformation. In general, INFPs value people over truth, and INTPs value truth over people. How this manifests will differ.

I felt like it was similar to “What is 2+2!?” And the INTP answer would be “Uh, 4.” And the INFP answer would be “You can’t define what 2+2 is, let them be individuals!”

If there is indeed this bias, then it sorely misrepresents the use of Fi (and Ti as well, actually). If you really want to follow this analogy, then it should go like this:

Q: ‘What is 2 + 2?’

Fi: ‘It depends on the person and their morals!’
Ti: ‘It depends on the person and what makes sense to them!’
Te: ‘4.’
Fe: ‘I don’t know, what does everyone else think?’

But I think you’ll agree that this is silly. Te-users are not the only ones capable of solving simple arithmetic problems. Not to mention the fact that 2 + 2 = 4 has nothing to do with logic and everything to do with what we, as humans, have arbitrarily defined what it should be. Anyway, this is irrelevant to the issue at hand.

So let me give you an answer in (hopefully) briefer terms:

A logical, unemotional INFP is an INTP.

An INFP who is capable of using logic but prefers moral judgment and connection to other people as their modus operandi, who prefers not to express their emotions or has trouble being appropriate to the occasion - whether saying what shouldn’t be said or not saying what should be said…

… is just an INFP.