silver binding

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1690s book with filigree silver binding - National Library of Sweden

This binding is an exquisite example of Danish filigree technique
from the 1690s.It belongs to the National Library’s Huseby
Collection and was once owned by Karren Mogensdotter Skoug.
Her name and the year 1692 are engraved on the inside of the clasps. -(x)
Ashes pt 5 [M]

A/N: HAPPY HALLOWEEN. I COULDNT NOT UPLOAD THIS TODAY ;-)

Genre: Angst, Smut, Vampire!AU

Pairing: Hoseok x Reader

Length: 6.0k

Originally posted by lethargicmin

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Final

You didn’t know if you were alive or dead. Except it was hard to breathe. The raging pain from your stomach was making it hard to fixate on anything. You slammed your eyes shut, hoping that when you woke up it would all be a dream. Maybe you would even be human again. That this was all some elaborate nightmare. You would wake up in your room. Your cat sleeping at the foot of your bed. Your parents would be downstairs arguing over sections of the newspaper.

It was all a dream. It had to be.

But when your eyes opened your realized you were still in hell. Someone had brought you to the room. The room. The room where you took your first drink. The room you were sure you weren’t going to ever leave. Except this time, you were the only person inside its walls.

You tried to pick yourself up off the floor but the searing pain that ripped through your body held you to the ground with invisible hands. You looked down at your body. There was so much blood. And then you remembered the guard you had killed. Everything was coming back in patches. Bits and pieces fitting together like a puzzle piece.

You noticed your open wounds. The source of the pain. Bullet holes. 5 of them. That son of bitch had shot you 5 times. You swallowed as you realized that none of the bullets were near your heart. He wasn’t trying to kill you. He had something else in mind.

Him. Kai. His voice echoed through your ears as you tried to think of how you got here. Kai wasn’t in the building. He had been waiting for you in the car. He must of somehow known what you were planning on doing. Somehow he wasn’t dead. You slammed your head against the wall. You felt the blood trickling down a new wound. But you didn’t care. You were going to be dead in a few hours anyway. How could I be so fucking stupid? All of this for nothing.

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The Job

Authors Note: I think everyone knows how I feel about a Tom Hardy gif but this particular one made me think the very thoughts that you are about to read. NSFW but also not too unsafe. I hope you enjoy! XOXO

Trigger Warning: Smut, Profanity, Slight fluff


“Come on then! No need to bang away knowing that I told you to get in here,” he yelled at the door.

I opened it slowly. Expecting to see him in a rather foul mood. I had already pissed him off by showing up late earlier and now I fucked up his scheduling for his auditions. It wasn’t technically my fault. While I was taking the notes, he was taking all of me in.

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Making new rune pendants.

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The Luttrell Psalter
London The Folio Society 2012
624 pages - Over 600 pages of illuminations
Limited edition 34/1480 copies only

Bound in the finest grade Nigerian goatskin, Blocked with a design by David Eccles using gold, silver and coloured foils
The binding design using motifs from the Psalter and the Luttrell coat of arms of six martlets argent.
Presented in a hand-made solander box, with a leather label, the Psalter is accompanied by Professor Michelle P. Brown’s fascinating scholarly commentary.

This Armenian manuscript was created in 1475 by a Armenian scribe named Aristakes for the Armenian Apostolic Church

It contains a series of sixteen images on the life of Christ preceding the text of the Gospels, as well as the traditional Evangelist portraits, and there are marginal illustrations throughout. The style of the miniatures, which employ brilliant colors and emphasize decorative patterns, is characteristic of manuscript production in the region around Lake Van during the fifteenth century.

This jeweled and enameled silver binding bears a composition of the Adoration of the Magi on the front and the Ascension on the back.


Numerous inscriptions  spanning a few centuries attest to the manuscript’s long history of use and revered preservation

Queen Margaret of Scotland (c. 1045 – 16 November 1093) also known as Margaret of Wessex and Saint Margaret of Scotland.

Granddaughter of King Edmund Ironside and grandniece of King Edward the Confessor, Margaret was well educated, mostly in Hungary, where her family was raised in exile during the rule of the Danish kings in England. As one of the last members of the Anglo-Saxon royal family, she was in danger after the Norman Conquest and took refuge at the court of Malcolm the Third, king of Scotland, made famous by Shakespeare in his play Macbeth. Intelligent, beautiful, and devout, Margaret married Malcolm in 1069 or 1070. Their union was exceptionally happy and fruitful for the Scottish nation, producing eight children. Two of her children, Alexander and David, became kings of Scotland. Through Margaret and her daughter Matilda English monarchs from the reign of Henry the Second to the present day can trace their ancestry to the pre-Conquest Anglo-Saxon kings of England.

According to her biographer Turgot, prior of Durham and bishop of Saint Andrews, Margaret sought with considerable zeal to reform what she considered to be careless practices in the Church in Scotland, then at a low ebb in its ecclesial life. She insisted that the observance of Lent was to begin on Ash Wednesday, rather than on the following Monday. She further insisted that the Mass be celebrated according to the accepted Roman rite of the Church, and not in barbarous form and language. The Lord’s Day was to be a day when, she said, “we apply ourselves only to prayers”. She played a prominent role in the foundation of monasteries, churches, orphanages, and hostels for pilgrims. She and Malcolm together worked to rebuild the abbey of Iona, made famous centuries before by Columba and Aidan, and they had Dumfermline built to be a burial place for the Scottish royal family, like a Scottish Westminster Abbey.

Margaret’s private life was devoted to prayer and reading, lavish almsgiving (including the ransoming of Anglo-Saxon captives), and ecclesiastical needlework. She saw to the spiritual welfare of her large household, providing servants with opportunity for regular worship and prayer. Her influence over the king was considerable as he, strong-willed and initially rough in character, came through love for her to value what she valued. Turgot wrote that Malcolm saw “that Christ truly dwelt in her heart…what she rejected, he rejected…what she loved, he for love of her loved too.” Although he could not read, he liked to see the books she used at prayer and would have them embellished with gold and silver bindings. One such book thought to be hers, a pocket Gospel with fine portraits of the Evangelists, survives in the Bodleian Library at Oxford. A psalter at Edinburgh University Library may well have been hers, too.

Margaret lived just long enough to learn of the tragic deaths of her husband and one of their sons on a military expedition against the English king William Rufus, who had confiscated her father’s estates in England. Worn by her austerities and the rigors of childbearing, Margaret died on the sixteenth of November, 1093, at the age of forty-seven. She was buried beside Malcolm at Dunfermline, and her body was translated in 1250. At the Reformation, her body and Malcolm’s were translated to the Escorial in Madrid. Her work among the people and her reforms of the Church made her Scotland’s most beloved saint, and the Roman Catholic Church named her a patron of Scotland in 1673.

Pictured: St.Margaret of Scotland, stained glass, Holy Cross, Swainby, North Yorkshire
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The ‘Mayer’ Helm from from Poland dated between the 10th-11th Centuries on display at the Royal Armouries in Leeds

This segment helm evolved from the Spangenhelm and popular in Eastern Europe until it was superseded in the 12th Century by the Great Helm. Both forms of helmets are closely-related to helmets made in East Asia, and were probably imported into Europe be migrant peoples from the the east such as the Huns and Avars.

Only the skull of the helmet survives, made of four iron plates covered with gilt copper attached by silver rivets, and originally with a silver binding round the base. The nasal and much of the decorative covering is missing.

Byzantine Museum of Ioannina:

Manuscript of the Gospels. Silver covered wooden binding (1575). Molyvdoskepastos-Ioannina. Monastery of Koimesis Theotokou.  

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Hello Mini-Monday fans! 

Today we have the very tiny and very lovely Codex Argenteus (The Silver Bible), from Uppsala University in Sweden, 1959.  The interior silver structure is a tiny replica of the 1662 binding of the Codex Argenteus, a manuscript which dates from the early sixth century, written during the period of Ostrogoth rule in northern Italy.  It contains fragments of the four gospels in the Gothic language, translated by the Bishop Ulfilas.  The manuscript is important because it is a rare example of the now extinct Germanic language. The codex itself, bound hundreds of years later in silver by the Count M.G. De La Gardie, was presented to Uppsala University in 1669.  All of this information and more is included inside this tiny pamphlet, translated into four different languages. 

Codex Argenteus (The Silver Bible), from Uppsala University in Sweden, 1959.  Un-catalogued miniature.

-Laura H.

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The Luttrell Psalter
London The Folio Society 2012
624 pages - Over 600 pages of illuminations
Limited edition 34/1480 copies only
Bound in the finest grade Nigerian goatskin, Blocked with a design by David Eccles using gold, silver and coloured foils
The binding design using motifs from the Psalter and the Luttrell coat of arms of six martlets argent.
Presented in a hand-made solander box, with a leather label, the Psalter is accompanied by Professor Michelle P. Brown’s fascinating scholarly commentary.

Our #TinyTuesday feature this week is small in size but big on design. This circa 1840 writing tablet boasts a mother of pearl binding with silver onlay, a velvet spine, red silk interior, and erasable pages. Pocket-sized luxury!

[LCP archive] [Writing tablet in mother of pearl with silver and velvet spine] [ca. 1840].

    For the brightest witch of your age, you are a foolish girl.
    Can you hear your heart? It beats like a bird’s. You can feel it pulse in your wrists and your neck and your chest. You’re frightened. There’s an incredible, intense agony in your head, something more marvellous than you could ever imagine.
    You have a right to be scared.
    The air burns around you. The molten silver binds you. The precious stones melt and leak into your mind like liquid, shimmering poison. Wit beyond measure is what you always wanted. Perhaps you didn’t anticipate how painful it would be.
    It was easy enough to come here when the library failed you. It was easy enough to stop on the seventh floor after dinner with quills and fresh parchment, a borrowed map in your hand and a phrase etched in your thoughts. I need to know what Horcruxes are.
    The room always provides.

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Byzantine Museum of Ioannina:

  1. (1st and 3rd row) Gospel. Venice, published by Nikolaos Glykis (1671). Silver-gilt binding with enamel decoration (1690). Vellas Monastery. Archbishop Spyridon Collection.
  2.  “Chronicle Book Containing the History of Byzance”, Venice, published by Demetrios Theodosios (1767)
  3. The bee, the publishing logo of Nikolaos Glykis.
  4. New Testament, Venice, published by Nikolaos Saros. (1695) Leather binding.

From the museum book collection (translation mine):

After the fall of Constantinople, a greek community flourishes in Venice. It was there that the first Greek printing workshop was founded in 1670, by a merchant from Ioannina named Nikolaos Glykis

Glykis with his compatriots Nikolaos Saros and Demetrios Theodosios who founded two more Greek printing workshops in 1686 and 1755, began publishing consistently liturgical texts, grammar manuals and popular texts that were then distributed in Greek space through Ioannina- the most important distribution point of the era. 

The books were printed on cheap paper with woodcut, or etching illustrations.

anonymous asked:

Omg is the first time that I see the ask box open!! Could you recommend some new vampire and highschool au fics please?? Thanks a lot for all your hard work, I really love this blog! ♡♡♡

hi anonie :) for hs!au you can head over to our masterlist since it’s just recently updated ^-^ now, it’s time for an update for vampire!au tag

ohoho that’s done (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧ happy kaisoo reading

- Admin N

Byzantine Museum of Ioannina:

Gospel. Venice, published by Nikolaos Glykis (1671). Silver-gilt binding with enamel decoration (1690). Vellas Monastery. Archbishop Spyridon Collection.