short crust

PJO/HOO characters as things my friends have said (spring 2017 edition)
  • Nico: The gods got halfway through me and said "it's useless" and threw me in the reject pile yet here i am!
  • Sally: *notices divorce papers* OwO what's this?
  • Percy: I SCREAM BUT THE GODS WON'T LISTEN
  • Annabeth: Appreciate my science you ungrateful mango
  • Octavian: Do you fuk wit da war?
  • Paul blofis: I look like the creepy uncle at the barbecue who comments too much on your khaki shorts
  • Leo: FUCK PIZZA CRUST *proceeds to try and make a sassy exit but instead face plants into the ground*
  • Jason: *whispers* who am-*sings loudly* WHO AM I
  • Hazel: Like this vine if you've ever..... Died.... Inside Before
  • Reyna: I'm starting a new band called "Tragically Queer". You can find us collabing with panic at the dick in the near future.
  • Frank: Leave me and my bae alone you meme lords
  • Piper: might as well call me your waitress CUS I'M GONNA BE SERVIN UP SOME TEA FOR YOU TONIGHT LADIES
  • Will: My mom said i can't hang out tonight
Baking Vocabulary in Spanish

I recently marathoned the entirety of The Great British Bake Off and I found myself googling translations all the time so here’s some very specific vocab that you’ll probably never use, enjoy!

  • Baker: repostero
  • To bake: hornear / elaborar repostería 
  • Rolling pin: (el) rodillo.
  • Piping bag: (la) manga pastelera
  • To proof: dejar fermentar, ‘dejar que la masa suba’
  • To knead: amasar
  • To pipe: decorar con manga pastelera.
  • To pipe (icing) onto (a cake): echar (el glaseado) con manga en (el pastel)
  • To set (mousse, gelatin): cuajar
  • To temper (chocolate): templar
  • To crimp (the edges) (I took this one as a direct challenge Sue): pellizcar (los bordes) para unirlos.
  • To whisk: mezclar/batir 
  • Dough: (la) masa
  • French/swiss meringue: merengue francés/suizo
  • Marzipan: (el) mazapán
  • Mascarpone cream: (la) crema de mascaspone
  • (Lemon) curd: crema de limón
  • Pasty: (la) empanadilla
  • Fillings: relleno
  • Ganache: (el) ganache (be warned, unless you’re talking to a baker, nobody will understand what this means) 
  • Short crust pastry: masa quebrada
  • Cream puff pastry: pasta de profiteroles
  • Rough puff pastry: hojaldre simplificado
  • Puff pastry: hojaldre
  • Hot water pastry: masa de agua caliente (no se usa mucho en España)
  • Tier (cake): (el) piso
  • Bun: (el) bollo
  • Cookie (soft): pasta
  • Biscuit (crunchy): galleta
  • Cake: (el) pastel (has more cream), (el) bizcocho (just a sponge)
  • Pie: (la) tarta (sweet fillings)/ (la) empanada (savory fillings)
  • Icing: glaseado
  • Shortbread: (la) galleta de mantequilla, (la) mantecada
  • Flatbread: (el) pan plano, pan sin levadura
  • Pancake: (la) tortita
  • Scone: (el) bizcochito
  • To dunk (a biscuit): untar
  • To taste: probar, degustar (in a more professional setting)
  • To curdle (chocolate): cuajar, coagular
  • To crumble: desmigajarse 
  • Soggy (bottom): (base) pastosa
  • Scrumptious: sabroso, suculento
  • Scrummy: rico, delicioso
  • Overproofed (Paul Holliday’s voice): fermentado durante demasiado tiempo 
  • Bland: insípido (lacks flavor), soso (lacks salt)
  • Burnt: quemado
  • Raw: crudo
  • Edible: comestible
  • Chewy: gomoso
  • Crispy/crunchy: crujiente
  • Rubbery: chicloso/gomoso
  • Close textured: de miga (muy) junta/compacta
  • Overpowered (flavor): ahogado, enmascarado (por) (when specifying what overpowered it)
  • To come through (flavor): se nota (el sabor)

Some of these don’t really have translations so I just… went with whatever sounded best. So, if anyone has something that fits better, suggestions are welcome. Also this is obviously Spanish from Spain, again, if you know these in some other dialect, please do share!

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Streuselkuchen mit Erdbeeren. Streuselkuchen (“crumb cake”) is a German specialty, traditionally made of a yeast dough covered with sweet crumbs aka Streuseln. The Streuseln are made from sugar, butter, and flour, mixed at a 1:1:2 ratio. German Streuselkuchen is usually made on a baking tray and cut into oblong pieces. The crumbs should be about 50% of the cake or about 30% when fruit is added. The most popular fruity versions are with cherries or plums, but many fruits would work. Yeast dough is the original; a short crust is possible, too. Puff pastry at the bottom turns it into what is called a Prasselkuchen.