shooting in america

Abdelkrim Hassane, 41, worked as an analyst-programmer for the Quebec government. “He  had two young children who waited in vain for their father to return home,”

Azzeddine Soufiane, 57, was originally from Morocco and emigrated to Quebec City to attend  Laval University. He was known as a backbone for newly arrived Muslims. “He was almost like the president of the community. He helped and guided all the people who arrived here – students, families,” said a member of his Moroccan community group.

Khaled Belkacemi, 60, was from Algeria. He received a master’s in chemical engineer from Université de Sherbrooke and was a professor at Laval University.

Boubaker Thabti, 44, was a pharmacy worker from Tunisia who lived only 5 minutes away from the mosque. He had two children, ages 3 and 10.

Mamadou Tanou Barry, 42, and Ibrahima Barry, 39, were friends and civil-servants from Guinea that lived in the same apartment building, but were not related despite sharing the same last name. Ibrahima Barry worked for the health insurance board and had four young children, and Mamadou was an IT worker who left behind two sons.

I want every news org to put this fact front and center when writing about the shooting.

USA. Ohio. Kent. May 4, 1970. Mary Ann Vecchio, a 14 year-old student, kneels beside Jeffrey Milley who’d been shot by the National Guard. Though the photo that first circulated turned out to be manipulated, this is the original, un-doctored version. This picture won the Pulitzer Prize.

The Kent State shootings occurred at Kent State University and involved the shooting of college students by the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970. National Guardsmen fired into a group of unarmed students, killing four and wounded another nine—some marching against the Vietnam War and American invasion of Cambodia, some walking by or observing the protest from a distance. 

Guardsmen had on the previous day used tear gas to disperse protesters and, by May 4th, rallies were banned and classes resumed. But 2,000 people gathered in what quickly turned into confrontation. Tear gas and bayonets were met with rocks and verbal taunts, which were met with more than 60 rounds of gunfire. In 1974, all charges were dropped against eight of the Guardsmen involved. There were 28 guards who admitted to firing on top of the hill, 25 of these guards fired 55 rounds into the air and into the ground, 2 of the guards fired .45cal pistol shots, 2 into the crowd, and 3 into the air, one guard fired birdshot into the air. The guardsmen fired 61 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others, one of whom suffered permanent paralysis.

There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of four million students, and the event further affected public opinion—at an already socially contentious time—over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

Photograph: John Filo/Getty