shocked for life

It is always shocking to meet life where we have thought we were alone. ‘Look out!’ we cry, ‘it’s alive.’ And therefore this is the very point at which so many draw back - I would have done so myself if I could - and proceed no further with Christianity. An 'impersonal God’ - well and good. A subjective God of beauty, truth and goodness, inside our own heads - better still. A formless life-force surging through us, a vast power which we can tap - best of all. But God Himself, alive, pulling at the other end of the cord, perhaps approaching at an infinite speed, the hunter, king, husband - that is quite another matter. There comes a moment when the children who have been playing at burglars hush suddenly: was that a real footstep in the hall? There comes a moment when people who have been dabbling in religion ('Man’s search for God’!) suddenly draw back. Supposing we really found Him? We never meant it to come to that! Worse still, supposing He had found us?
—  C.S. Lewis, Miracles, ch. xi
Guess what?

I’m actually writing fic.

Shocking, I know. Life’s been so nutso lately - I’ve missed this.

Also I probably have three dozen Holtzbert fics I need to read, so perhaps I shall accomplish that this weekend as well. 

10

Daisy Johnson in Agents of SHIELD: ‘What If…’

There is no "pro-life". There is just an elaborate misogynist long con to strip women of any rights or gains made in the 20th Century.

This statement is a response to the people who are continually shocked that “pro-life” doesn’t care about babies after they are born, the death penalty, making sure poor people don’t die b/c their health care has been stolen, etc.

Yes, of course “pro-life” doesn’t care about that. Because it’s not about lives and it never was.

They never cared about babies. The whole baby thing is part of the con. 

It’s a con. Stop believing in right wing lies.

It’s not about babies. It was never about babies. Stop arguing with them about babies. 

Never argue with a liar on their own liar terms.

This is why “pro-life” people are also coming after IUDs and the Pill and preventing people from getting life-saving miscarriage care.

So-called “pro-life” is a movement that murders doctors and bombs medical clinics. 


And we really need to talk about tactics here, b/c misogyny is winning the propaganda war and has been for decades.

If your personal stance is- I believe everyone should be able to get an abortion but… Just stop before the but.

Stop qualifying it with “but I never would” or I think it’s wrong" or whatever other “I’m a good person” signal you are trying to throw out.

B/c by doing that, you are ceding ground to misogynist violence. You are letting them win the “is abortion a bad thing” argument.

Abortion is not bad. And if you support abortion access- All you need to say is “I support abortion access for anyone who wants one”. 

We have to reframe the abortion fight as what it really is- a misogynist attack on gender equality. It’s not about babies at all. It never was.

If you understand that, you will understand why the so called “pro-life” movement behaves as it does.

The rhetoric and behavior does not match up at all. That should tell you something. 

Don’t pay attention to what they say. Only to what they do.

4

Kea are known for being utterly fearless around humans. This can be both a blessing and a curse; on the one hand, many tourists fall in love with the kea’s comical antics.  On the other, this fearlessness combined with the parrot’s natural curiosity has led them to cause significant damage to property.  Kea have been known to rifle through clothes, open backpacks, strip windshield wipers and rubber sealant from cars.  They are also unrepentant thieves, flying away with anything that catches their fancy.  One kea flew through the open window of a camper van, making away with a bag containing $900 of a tourist’s money.  And a Scottish tourist got the shock of his life when a kea flew off with his passport!  The tourist in question stated: “My passport is somewhere out there in Fiordland. The kea’s probably using it for fraudulent claims or something. I’ll never look at a kea in the same way.”

Supergirl 2x12 ending recap ft Mom

So, while I was quietly enjoying my show and waiting for The Hug my mother came and sat with me and this was her commentary during these scenes

Me: What?

Me: *completely shocked, and starts laughing very hard*

Me: *still laughing*

Me: Hug a pillow? Seriously? *continues laughing*

Me: *explains the whole x-ray vision and lead thing*

Me: *bursts out laughing again*

Literally, even my mom can see the chemistry they have! I absolutely did not expect that!

somebodylost-chan  asked:

I'd like to ask, how do you know when fight/smut scenes are necessary? Or how to make them effective & not simply as fanservice or just for word count? Usually, I find myself skimming through fight scenes as a reader, bored. As a writer, I'm inclined to just 'fade to black' and imply stuff at the next chapters. I'm not really a fight/smut-scene writer, even though my characters know & need to fight. Thanks for keeping this blog. :D

A good fight scene (and a good smut scene for that matter) always works in the service of the narrative. It works toward the cohesive big picture.

From an entertainment standpoint, violence is boring.

You need your audience invested in the characters participating in the violence, in the actions and events leading up to the fight, in the aftermath and how this will effect the character’s overall goals.

In a narrative context, if you’re bored during a fight scene or a sex scene it’s because the build up to that moment failed. The scene itself may also have failed. However, your foundation is what makes your story sing.

Think of a story like building blocks. You’re playing Jenga with your reader on a homemade house, they’re slowly pulling out the pieces and you’re betting you built your blocks well enough to withstand scrutiny. You’ve got to keep them interested long enough to get to the end before the whole thing comes tumbling down.

A fight sequence which works in concert with it’s narrative is enjoyable, doesn’t overstay it’s welcome, and ultimately works to build up the story it’s telling. Fighting isn’t fighting, you see. Combat is a form of problem solving, the fight itself is an expression of the character’s individuality. Everything we’ve been learning about them, their goals, and their behaviors are being put in a pressure cooker and dialed up.

You should be learning about the character as the fight progresses, the fight working on multiple levels in concert with its narrative to get the story where it needs to go. Often, a first fight is like an establishing shot in film. You get a feel for who this character is when under pressure, who they are. Peril can be a great way to get the audience invested, but its up to the author to prove why they should.

Poor fight sequences don’t tell you anything. They’re there to establish the character as capable of fighting but don’t even do that because their concept of combat is generic.

The combatants aren’t individuals expressing themselves, the fight isn’t proving anything except fighting, it doesn’t have meaning except for its attempts to prove the narrative’s poor concept of badassery. This often happens with no regard for the setting’s rules, the aftermath consequences, what the character’s actions will effect in the long run.

It doesn’t mean anything and, while violence is shocking and terrifying in real life, in fiction violence has to mean more than just an exchange of blows.

How many times have you read a book where several mooks show up to get their ass kicked by the protagonist? They limp off at the end and while they’re often in a perfect position to be seen again due to their connections, we never do.

In even just a moderately competent narrative, those same mooks are characters. We’ll see them again in bit roles. They’ll play a role, either to help or hurt later as an aftermath consequence of the protagonist’s earlier actions. These are callback characters we can use to remind the audience of what happened previously in the narrative, and offer up some catharsis.

In a really well written scene, these mooks serve an important purpose when it comes to establishing the protagonist’s character in a quick snapshot. Like the moderately competent character, they come back later to the aid or the detriment of the protagonist. The mooks’ response actions are a direct result of their encounter with the character, often acting as an inciting incident. The protagonist suffers direct consequences as a result of their actions, whether its injury, loss, or the attention of the villain which causes them to lose something. In these fight scenes, you can see the story’s trajectory because it acts as another way to get to know the hero, the secondary characters, the tertiary characters, and whoever else is participating. It’s working on five different levels.

What you often see in a good fight sequence, whether it’s in a written medium or film, is the culmination of a great deal of hard work on the part of the author. A smut sequence is a reward, it’s a way to pay off on the reader’s investment in the relationship between these two characters and the narrative’s investment in them. It doesn’t matter if that’s hardcore sex, or a Victorian hand touch, or a knockout blow to the jaw, the end result is the same. It’s entertaining, satisfying, and even cathartic.

A poor sex scene is just dolls bumping bits. A poor fight scene is just dolls trading blows. Nothing occurs, nothing happens, there’s none of the underlying satisfaction or catharsis in the outcome. You don’t have any investment, no consequences, it overstays its welcome and tells you nothing about the characters.

You’ve no reason to care, so you don’t.

As a reader, you don’t owe a writer attention when reading their work. They’ve got to earn it. If they aren’t, then it may be that the story isn’t for you and that’s okay. Take into account your tastes,

It takes practice to choreograph a fun fight scene. Writing sex and violence is mostly about learning to find your limits (i.e. what you’re comfortable with writing), and overcoming embarrassment. Determine the difference between need and want.

Are you avoiding writing these scenes because you’re scared of being bad at them or because they just don’t interest you?

These are two very different issues, and it’s easy to hide from the first behind the second. Be honest with yourself. If it is fear, then don’t give into it. The easy solution if you’re afraid of being bad at something is to practice. Start looking critically at the media you consume, when you start to get bored during a fight scene or a sex scene, when you want to skip ahead, ask yourself, “why?”. Check out the sequences and stories where this doesn’t happen, and try to figure out the differences between the two.

When it comes to the mechanics of both violence and sex, the more you learn the better off you’ll be at writing it. The more you practice writing violence/sex/romance then the better you’ll be. Like with everything, it’ll probably be pretty terrible in the beginning but the more you practice, the better you get. Writing itself is a skill, but its also a lot of sub-skills built in underneath the surface. Being good at dialogue doesn’t mean you’ll be good at action, having a knack for great characterization doesn’t mean you’ll be good at writing setting description. Putting together great characters doesn’t mean you’ll automatically be good at worldbuilding.

Don’t be too hard on yourself.

All it takes to figure out whether or not the time to fight is right is by listening to your gut.

Remember, the best scenes are based in narrative cohesion and emotional investment. They’re a pay off in and of themselves for your audience, dessert after dinner. They aren’t the meat and potatoes. If you set out to just write a fight scene or write a smut scene then it’ll get gratuitous. Then the focus is on the fight or the sex itself, hangs entirely on their shoulders, and you’ve just upped the ante for how entertaining you need to be.

It’s not “how do I write a fight scene”, it’s “how did my characters get to this point and why are they fighting”. If you start from a character place, it gets easier. The same is true with romance. “How do my characters participate in a romance (sex or not)”.

Make it about the individuals, that’s when it really gets fun.

And, if you get too stuck, try writing fight scenes with characters who don’t know much about how to fight. Sometimes, it’s easier to get into it when you begin at the beginning. There’s a lot less pressure convincing an audience with a character who knows nothing than one at the top of their field.

There’s a lot less stress about “is this right?” when you’re trying to get a feel for the flow if you’re dealing with a character who doesn’t know jack shit. Fight scenes with characters who know nothing can also be really, really, really fun. They’re wild, improvisational frenzies where all you have is the character sorting through their alternative, non-fighting skills trying to figure out how to survive.

Believe it or not, this will help you because you don’t get to cheat with the idea that your character already knows what they’re doing when you don’t. It’ll help you tap into the character, seeing scenarios from their perspectives, and writing to that instead of “generic fight scene”. When you’re unsure, characters who know nothing about the subject matter they’re engaging in but still have to engage are great. They teach you how to write from the standpoint and perspective of the individual. You need those skills just as much when writing characters who are professionals or at the top of their field.

If you don’t think you can write an interesting fight sequence with a neophyte, then that might be a part of the problem. A character doesn’t need to be good at something to be entertaining. A smut sequence where everyone’s fumbling, knocking into each other, embarrassed, stuck in their clothing, cheesy, corny, and laughing can be just as fun (if not more so and more honest) than the ones that generally get envisioned.

For me, good is entertaining and the entertainment is based in humanity but you need to define “good” for yourself in your own writing. Be honest with yourself about your fears and you’ll find a way to bridge yourself to the kind of writing you want to be doing.

Freeing yourself of your own internalized preconceived notions will help a lot, and produce stories that are way more fun.

-Michi

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For some reason all I can imagine is when Combeferre admits to Courfeyrac that he likes him, Courf is so surprised and nervous and so didn’t see that coming that he just jazz hands away backwards and into a different room so he can hyperventilate ecstatically in peace and Combeferre is just bemused like that did not go as expected

  • Me before seeing "Rogue One": Well, it's not Episode VIII, but it has Darth Vader and it's still a Star Wars movie, so maybe it'll be decent enough to hold me over :/
  • Me after seeing "Rogue One": Was there a time before Rogue One and stardust and the Erso family I don't know but I will forever claim Jyn, Cassian, Bodhi, Baze, Chirrut & K-2SO as my precious little cinnamon roll babies who deserved so much better than what they got and I will never again think of a beach without sobbing over RebelCaptain nor can I watch the New Hope opening crawl without screaming about the unknown "rebel spies" who were galactic heroes and while we're at it, hey Lucasfilm, how bout some Rogue One references in the future Star Wars movies or maybe a cameo in the Han Solo movie actually you know what, no one really wants the Han Solo movie anyway so how about a prequel about the Rogue One crew instead...???
Incredulity // Jughead Smut

Summary: Fred Andrews is the single parent of twins. He walks in on his daughter with her girlfriend in the middle of sex. Following that breakup you got together with your brothers best friend whom doesn’t have experience in sex so you teach your boyfriend. Guess your not the only twin in a forbidden relationship…only one is legal.

Characters: Jughead x Andrews!Reader, Betty x Reader, Kevin Keller, Archie Andrews (mentioned) and Fred Andrews

Words: 3237

Disclaimer: I do not own Riverdale or the characters. I do not own the Comics either. Jughead is NOT asexual in his.

Warnings: Swearing, underage drinking, smut, former same sex relationship,

Author: Caitsy

Tagging: At the bottom

A/N Originally this was going to be a Veronica fic but apparently my subconscious was needy for Jughead.

Master List

Prompt List

ASK US A QUESTION LIST

Jokes were always made about the Andrews twins, Archie was the boy that got hit by the puberty bus during the summer before sophomore year. You however had came out of the awkward phase a lot early than your twin brother, it was the end of middle school when you hit puberty in the most graceful way.

While Archie incredibly straight, you were bisexual with no real preference to be honest. Nobody believed that you were bisexual, especially your dad because he had never seen you look at a female before. Fred Andrews got a rude awakening when he walked in on Betty Cooper going down on his freshmen aged daughter. Next the whole town found out about the relationship, minus the sexual side, with the knowledge that Betty had been crushing on you. It was purely fun for you and experimental for her so it didn’t cause any problems when she discovered she was only into guys and actually liked your twin. You guys continued to be best friends.

It was amusing when your father walked in on Betty and you because he fumbled through the safe sex talk. He didn’t know much about safe sex between females but he tried his best even if both of you were embarrassed beyond belief. He was happy however that you wouldn’t become the parental nightmare of pregnant teenager.

It was the last day of summer that he caught you with your boyfriend in bed together and getting the shock of his life for the second time. Jughead and you had gotten together at the very end of freshman year. Nobody, even Archie whom knew everything about you, knew about it because there was no real reason that they needed to know. You were a slut by any means, you only had had sex with Betty so you didn’t care if someone found out that Jughead and you were together. The only thing was that you hadn’t gone that far yet.

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Pure Panic // Jackson Wang

Originally posted by kookihyunnie

Pairing: Jackson x Reader

Genre: Fluff, Drama, slight Angst

Summary; Jackson receives confusing, devastating news that you’ve been severely injured, so he gets on the next flight back to Korea to try and find you.

Reminder; (Y/F/N) = Your Full Name

Reminder; (Y/L/N) = Your Last Name

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