shitbenedictsays

I’ve been very lucky at what’s happened in my career to date, but playing something as far from me as possible is an ambition of mine - anything from a mutated baddy in a comic book action thriller, to a detective. If anything, I’d like Gary Oldman’s career: he’s the perfect example of it. I’ve love to have a really broad sweep of characters - to be able to do something edgy, surprising and unfashionable.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, BBC Press Release, May 2005 (x)

I have found myself casually [analysing] people on the train. At the businessman, say, who had a pale line around his ring finger, I’d think, ‘Hmm, I wonder what’s going on there, then?’ And I’d look at his shirt collar to see whether he had washed it, and the size of his luggage to see if he had been away overnight… Well, you can’t help but go there in your mind, can you?
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Benedict Cumberbatch, Telegraph interview, July 2010 (x)

Sherlock Holmes and John Watson are a fantastic pairing. They are in many ways… not quite chalk and cheese, but they complement each other, really. It’s not a thing of difference being a problem; it’s the thing that allies them. They are the missing half of either part of them.
—  Benedict Cumberbatch, Unlocking Sherlock
The coat was interesting, because there is so much about Sherlock in the original Conan Doyle books, that is modern, so the hardest thing to get right were the clothes and how to dress him for a contemporary audience and what should the silhouette be. The coat was Ray Holman’s, the costume designer’s idea. Sherlock’s suits have a clean, linear, perfunctory beauty about them, there’s nothing showy or flamboyant. They’re very well cut, functional but still very stylish and I think that sums up Sherlock perfectly.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, on Sherlock’s coat and suits, BBC Press Release, December 2011 (x)

It’s a crucial relationship in the story and Guillam sacrifices a lot for Smiley, a man he respects enormously and regards almost as a parental figure. Guillam sees Smiley as a man who is trustworthy in an increasingly opaque and slippery moral landscape.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, on George Smiley and Peter Guillam’s relationship in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, Daily Mail interview, July 2011 (x)

John le Carré is an actor’s dream. He knew the spying profession well enough to see what it did to human beings, especially men. He really was part of that world, and that’s where the authenticity comes in - it’s not just the colours or geography or historical accuracy.
He is a fantastic man - so eloquent and beautiful. Every single nuance of the characters has been thought out, all the back story, and he gives you a very rich and detailed tip of an iceberg.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, on John le Carré - author of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, Daily Mail interview, July 2011 (x)

I had a real yearning to make use of the opportunities I had at school. When I heard about the gap year of teaching English at a Tibetan monastery, I knew I had to do something about it really quickly otherwise it was going to get allocated.
I was very decisive. I worked for six months to drum up the finance as it was voluntary - there was no income. I worked in Penhaligon’s the perfumery for almost five months and I did waiting jobs.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, BBC Press Release, May 2005 (x)

It’s really odd when you meet somebody you’re about to play, and Stephen must have been as terrified by that as I was. I felt a huge responsibility.
The first thing you get when you meet someone with motor neurone disease is the complete person. You see past the disability instantly to all the rich complexities of a human character. It was very important for me not to let the symptoms swamp the character.
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Benedict Cumberbatch, on playing Stephen Hawking, Telegraph interview, April 2004 (x)