shirley chisholm

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Black Heritage Stamps with Ella Fitzgerald, Hattie McDaniel, Madam C.J. Walker, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Bessie Coleman, Sojourner Truth, Anna Julia Cooper, Marian Anderson, Shirley Chisholm.

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28 Queens Of Black History Who Deserve Much More Glory

Black history lessons in classrooms shouldn’t be limited to the names of men and only a few women. Especially when there are countless women who’ve made enormous strides for the black community, too.

The revolutionary words Angela Davis spoke, the record-breaking feats of Wilma Rudolph and the glass ceiling-shattering efforts of Shirley Chisolm paved the way for black women and girls across the country to dream big and act courageously.

Here are 28 phenomenal women everyone should acquaint themselves with this black history month.

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Women to remember today:

Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, feminist, Georgist, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.

Shirley Chisholm was an American politician, educator, and author. In 1968, she became the first African American woman elected to the United States Congress, and she represented New York’s 12th Congressional District for seven terms from 1969 to 1983. In 1972, she became the first black candidate for a major party’s nomination for President of the United States, and the first woman to run for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination.

Barbara Jordan A Democrat, she was the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first Southern African-American woman elected to the United States House of Representatives… Jordan’s sexual preference has never been determined, but some sources list her as a lesbian. She would have been the first lesbian known to have been elected to the United States Congress.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2013/03/03/despite-the-tremendous-risk-african-american-women-marched-for-suffrage-too/?postshare=2011478578433499&tid=ss_tw

Shirley Chisholm for President 1972: Unbought and Unbossed

In 1969, Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American woman elected to Congress. She advocated for minority rights, strongly opposed the Vietnam War and was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus. She would serve seven terms in office.

In 1972, Chisholm became the first African-American to make a run for a major party’s presidential nomination. Later, in her book, The Good Fight, she wrote, “I ran for the presidency, despite hopeless odds, to demonstrate the sheer will and refusal to accept the status quo.”

When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom that profit loses. - Shirley Chisholm (November 30, 1924 – January 1, 2005)

She was an American politician, educator, and author. She was the first African-American woman elected to Congress and the first major-party black candidate for President of the United States and the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

The liberals in the House strongly resemble liberals I have known through the last two decades in the civil rights conflict. When it comes time to show on which side they will be counted, they excuse themselves. - Shirley Chisholm (November 30, 1924 – January 1, 2005)

She was an American politician, educator, and author. She was the first African-American woman elected to Congress and the first major-party black candidate for President of the United States and the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

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Our Gender Cards feature fierce, trailblazing women who have changed America. Celebrate Women’s History Month and support reproductive rights by purchasing your very own deck –> http://bit.ly/2mRj2to