ship in stormy sea

“Jeez, Kid…” Often times It’s impossible to navigate the stormy seas of friendship because the other “ships” don’t want you in their waters. When you don’t know what is happening, or why it’s happening, Aspies make assumptions to fill in those gaps. When that happens, you often end up with heartbreaking moments like this.

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etsyfindoftheday 3 | 11.9.16

handmade pottery finds by karaleighford

karaleighford’s minimalist style is a go-to for this pottery lover … i’m all about her gorgeously glazed mugs and other rad ceramic items, like juicers and spoons and more.

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On February 5th 1941 a young man was combing a beach in South Uist when he saw a ship in trouble and beginning to list, the captain fought a valiant struggle with the stormy sea to keep his ship on course but it was futile, his ship came to rest on sandbanks off the Isle of Eriskay where she began to flood.

This ship would go down in history and would arguably become the most famous shipwreck in the Hebridean islands primarily because of it’s cargo, amongst other things 260,000 bottles of whisky, the ships name? The SS  Politician.
Unfortunately as the ship had veered off course an incorrect location was given to the lifeboat crew on Barra. Local islanders were roused and they set forth in a sailing boat to offer assistance to the crew. The lifeboat finally reached the ship and all the crew were rescued.

When the locals learned from the crew exactly what the ship was carrying, a series of illegal salvage operations took place at night, before the customs and excise officials arrived. The islands supplies of whisky had dried up due to war-time rationing, so the islanders periodically helped themselves to some of the 260,000 bottles of whisky before winter weather broke up the ship. Boats came from as far away as Lewis as news of the whisky travelled across the Outer Hebrides. No islander regarded it as stealing, as for them the rules of salvage meant that once the bounty was in the sea, it was theirs to rescue.

This of course was not the view of the local customs officer, Charles McColl, who was incensed at the blatant thievery that was going on. Not a penny had been paid in duty for this whisky so Mr McColl whipped up a furore and made an official complaint to the police. Villages were raided and crofts were turned upside down. Bottles were hidden, secreted, or sometimes drunk in order to hide the evidence.

On 26 April at Lochmaddy Sheriff Court a group of men from Barra pleaded guilty to theft and were charged between three and five pounds. Mr McColl was furious at the leniency of the men’s sentences, but the police, being mainly locals themselves, were tired of the bothering the locals who had not, in their minds, done such a bad thing. However, Mr McColl continued his crusade against these illegal salvagers and some of the men were sentenced to up to six weeks in prison in Inverness and Peterhead.

Back at sea, the official salvage attempts were not going too well, and it was eventually decided to let the Politician remain where she was. Mr McColl, who had already estimated that the islanders had stolen 24,000 bottles of whisky, ensured that there would be no more temptation. He applied for, and was granted, permission to explode her hull and as one islander, Angus John Campbell, commented: “Dynamiting whisky. You wouldn’t think there’d be men in the world so crazy as that!”

In 1987 Donald MacPhee, a local South Uist man, found eight bottles of whisky in the wreck. He sold them at auction for £4,000.

The wreck of the SS Politician still lies off the coast of Eriskay, although it is below the water line as winter gales have destroyed the deck and cabins. In 1988 the island got its own ‘legitimate’ pub, named ‘Am Politician’.

The events surrounding this ship were immortalised in the “fictional” book and a year later film Whisky Galore. The pic of the bottle is an original salvaged from the wreck, it is on display in the pub on Eriskay, you can pick up decanted bottle for as little as £70, not bad for a piece of history.

Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle solved? Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with 170mph winds may be to blame for disappearing ships and planes, scientists claim

By GARETH DAVIES. PUBLISHED: October 21, 2016
  • Bermuda Triangle has been been blamed for hundreds of missing vessels
  • The 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean is still unsolved
  • Scientists now believe the clouds and weather phenomenons are to blame
  • The so-called air bombs can create waves of up to 45ft, experts have said

Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with winds of 170mph could be behind the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle. Scientists have claimed the stormy blasts can flip ships into the sea and bring planes crashing down into the sea. The mystifying 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean has been blamed for the disappearance of at least 75 planes and hundreds of ships, but the oddly-shaped clouds may hold the secret to the vanishing acts.  

^ Hexagonal clouds creating terrifying air bombs with winds of 170mph could be behind the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

^ The mystifying 500,000km square patch in the North Atlantic Ocean has been blamed for the disappearance of at least 75 planes and hundreds of ships, but the oddly-shaped clouds may hold the secret to the vanishing acts

^ The winds created by the so-called air bombs are so powerful they generate 45ft high winds

The winds created by the so-called air bombs are so powerful they generate 45ft high winds. Meteorologist Randy Cerveny told the Mirror: ‘These types of hexagonal shapes over the ocean are in essence air bombs. 'They are formed by what are called microbursts and they’re blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size as they start to interact with each other.’

Researchers added massive clouds were appearing over the western tip of Bermuda Island – ranging from 20 to 55 miles across - and Dr Steve Miller, satellite meteorologist at Colorado State University told Science Channel’s What on Earth said: 'You don’t typically see straight edges with clouds. 'Most of the time, clouds are random in their distribution.' Scientists believe these weather phenomenons are behind the Bermuda Triangle mystery, according to the Mirror. At least 1,000 lives have been lost in the Triangle in the last 100 years. On average, four planes and 20 ships go missing every year.

“Seeking Harbor” oil on canvas 18″ x 32″

My last oil painting study. I’ve learned countless lessons about light and shadow, color blending, and patience from doing these studies and now I want to use these skills to focus on my own projects and fanart.