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FEY (2016) - Sheridan College

Our third year group film from 2015-2016!  Finally uploaded our eight months’ journey; please watch in HD!

A young girl named Theo is enticed into a mysterious and playful journey through the woods by the fairy Etain.

Listen to your elders.

Created by:

Rachel Li - Max Morgan - Fin Hickey - Kelsey Gottschlich - Jacquelyn Meadows -Daisy Wang - Larry Yang - Chen Chen - Krzysztof Ubysz -
Michael Hutton - J.M. Monserrat

ORIGINAL MUSIC TRACK BY EMILY FITCH

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twzKcsnkwik)

10

Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor Part 2

1) M1A1 Abrams. American third-gen MBT named after General Creighton Abrams. Highly mobile, the Abrams is designed for modern armored warfare and tank-to-tank combat. Notable features include the use of a powerful multifuel turbine engine, the adoption of sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. The M1 Abrams entered U.S. service in 1980, replacing the M60. The M1 remains the principal main battle tank of the United States Army and Marine Corps, and the armies of Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Australia and Iraq. The M1A1 upgrade began production in 1985 and continued to 1992, adding a pressurized NBC system, a rear bustle rack for improved stowage of supplies and crew belongings, redesigned blow-off panels and new M256 120 mm smoothbore cannon.

2 & 3) XM1 Abrams. American limited production prototype for the M! Abrams MBT. After the MBT-70 program was cancelled, as well as the iterative XM803, funds were reallocated to the XM815, renamed later XM1 Abrams. This new program reused most of the XM803 features but again, in a simpler and cheaper way. The need to eliminates the costliest technologies from the failed MBT-70 project, defined those used in the new tank. In June 1973, Chrysler and GM were awarded the contract to built prototypes of the new tank designated M1, handed over to the US Army for trials in February 1976. The first batch of M1s, before standardization, were still designated XM-1s, as Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) models.

4 & 5) M52A1. American 105mm SPG based off of the M41 Walker Bulldog light tank’s chassis. Development began in 1948 and was known as the T98 Howitzer Motor Carriage and entered service in 1951. Total production amounted to some 541 vehicles and the M52 saw extensive use during Vietnam and remains in service with some armies to this day. This M52A1 was donated by the Army in 1965

6) XM551 Sheridan. American prototype for the M551 Sheridan light tank. In the immediate post-World War II era, the US Army introduced the M41 Walker Bulldog into service to fill the role of a light tank. The lifespan of the M41 was fairly short; at 25 tons it was considered too heavy to be a true light tank, and had a rather short cruising range. With the appearence of the Pt-76 amphibious tank, the prototypes in development were scrapped and the XM551 begun. The XM551 would turn into the questionably useful M551 Sheridan and serve in Vietnam. This Sheridan was acquired by the museum from Army Material Command at Rock Island, Illinois in May 1971/

7) M4A3E8(76)w HVSS. American medium tank of WWII, the M4A3(76) HVSS upgraded the standard M4′s main gun to a more powerful 76mm cannon and Horizontal Volute Spring Suspension. This new suspension allowed for greater mobility as well as heavier armor. The vehicle was mass-produced beginning in late March 1945, with a total of 4542 the М4А3(76)W tanks with both suspension types manufactured.

8) M7B1 Priest. American SPG of WWII. Witnessing the events of the war, U.S. Army observers realized that they would need a self-propelled artillery vehicle with sufficient firepower to support armored operations. Lessons learned with half-tracks also showed that this vehicle would have to be armored and fully tracked. The result was the Priest, based off of the M3 Lee chassis, mounting an open superstructure and a 105mm gun. In addition to WWII, the Priest would fight in Korea with UN forces, and with Israel in the Six-Day War, War of Attrition and Yom Kippur War. The M7B1 variant uses the M4A3 Sherman chassis instead of the M3 Lee.

9 & 10) M41 Walker Bulldog. American postwar light tank that saw limited service in Korea and Vietnam. Designed to succeed the M24 Chaffee. While the Chaffee was a success, its main gun was not effective enough against well armored opponents. Although the primary mission of a light tank was scouting, the U.S. Army wanted one with more powerful armament. The M41 was the solution, thought it did not exactly fulfill the role of a light tank, and rather fit somewhere inbetween a medium and light tank. While the M41 was an agile and well armed vehicle, it was also noisy, fuel-hungry and heavy enough to cause problems with air transport. In 1952 work began on lighter designs (T71, T92), but those projects came to naught and were eventually abandoned.