shelled peas

Should Hallowe’en/Samhain Still be Celebrated on October 31 in the Northern Hemisphere?

This may seem like a ridiculous question, but hear me out. 

Usually, October is the end of the harvest, and the death of things is at hand. However, here in Southeastern, PA, this is not the case. I literally spent the day harvesting…but…harvesting like it was early August at the latest. It’s only just started getting cooler at night, and hunting is by and large too hot for the deer to be moving in great numbers. 

Usually at this time of year, the corn is yellowed, harvested, and dying. Instead, while we have harvested some, we still have ears on and the stalks are still somewhat green. 

Heck, I’m still shelling peas – and it’s not due to late planting. 

So, how tied is Hallowe’en/Samhain/The Veil tied to nature and the agricultural process? When global warming has had such a huge effect on the seasons and harvest, does it also effect the spiritual? Is the veil still thinnest at this time when we’ve only just got warnings for the first frost?

Just something I thought I would bring up for discussion and debate. 

Other observations from this episode:

–Jack’s idea of undercover is a sweater vest that looks like a grandmother handmade it for her least favorite grandchild and she doesn’t want anyone to have sex with him

–Hugh I love you and you are learning but boy boy boy boy boy I don’t even think that The Powerful Societal Regulation Of Patriarchy could convince you “Mrs. Hugh Collins who stays at home” is more enticing than “literally any person who gets to live with Miss Fisher are you kidding me hugh look at her hugh look at her”

–also love Dot saying to Mr. Butler “I couldn’t help her if I didn’t live here” and Mr. Butler just looking up from his pea shelling and like “I’m a humble butler named Butler who dedicated my life to this woman in the secret blood ceremony required to make butlering your name, your life, your soul, and Dot if you try to leave, I am bound by dark magic to bring you back to her”

–Miss Fisher’s toast to the happy couple like “Dot, you are a perfect effervescent angel of pure light energy and blistering competence that has helped me back the entire police force of this city irrelevant, and I love you. Also Hugh is here.”

–this episode needs more Mac as every episode needs more Mac, including episodes that focus on Mac

anonymous asked:

Would you care to write a drabble of the castle redoing Mrs. and Mr. Potts's wedding because Chip found his mother's wedding dress and was bummed that he missed it?

THIS! IS SO! FUCKING CUTE!!!! WHAT THE FUCK!!! WHO GAVE YOU THE RIGHT!


“Oof.” Lumiere sneezes. “I try not to go up to this attic, much—”

“Why? Worried you’re going to find an old flame?” Plumette teases.

No! No. Where do you hear such stories?! I never dated a Christmas ornament, I told you that never happened—”

“Mm-hmm. So why do you live in terror of the attic?”

“It’s not terr—AGH.” Lumiere sees a spider and leaps. Stubborn, still, as he stands on top of a chair: “It’s not terror. I just…don’t like old things.”

The two of them stand, surrounded by the dusting heaps of objects. Unmoving hat stands, cutlery, trunks, closets, knick-knacks: it is all too silent for Lumiere, too dead. Nothing here moves or feels or glows. Nothing has a heartbeat.

 It reminds him too much of the night of the curse.

Plumette sees his eyes start to glance toward a dusty, broken feather-duster, and sidesteps in front of it so all he sees are her skirts. “Mon amour! Come, now. We don’t have to stay. She just wants her old trunk, to get the linens from it—”

“Oui! Oui.” He starts from reverie and jumps toward the old trunk, hauled up in the back of the attic. “Beatrice” is inscribed on it, hard nails in cracked leather; and it still smells like tea and clean muslin and English-garden-rosemary. “I suppose she hasn’t had this out since she came across the channel—uff.”

Lumiere has never been strong in his arms. They get it down the stairs—where Adam, thank heaven, is there to pick it up with ease—and the maître d'sighs and massages his limbs.

“We’ve found you your trunk!” he calls to Mrs. Potts. “And about ten thousand pounds of dust. Did you secretly want to kill me? You know I’m allergic—”

“You’re just French, that’s what, no backbone for the harsher things in life,” says the housekeeper, bustling forward and smiling at the chest. “Now! Look at that! You’ve done wonderfully, Lumiere, Plumette. Hold it there, there’s a lock—”

The trunk flies open, with another cloud of dust. Lumiere sneezes in misery and stands back.

The whole castle has gathered for the momentous occasion of opening Mrs. Potts’ bridal trunk—Belle and Chapeau and Adam and Chip and all the rest, to see Mrs. Potts’ old life in all its dust and rosemary. She herself hasn’t looked at it for years; but she wants the linens, now, the ones her mother wove for her. They’ll look nice, out on the table. Mrs. Potts doesn’t like to hide things away, any more—she has the good china out at every meal, and lets Chip run around to his heart’s content.

He is not running now, though. He peers into the box with an eager face.

“I don’t see any linens,” he says.

“It’s not pirate treasure, dear, I told you,” says Mrs. Potts, digging down inside. “Just a trunk, with a few old secrets. Like—oh!—that.” She takes out an old, English-style Christmas ornament—a hammered-tin angel, with cunning eyes.

“I told you,” Plumette whispers, poking at Lumiere. He pretends to sneeze and looks away.

“Now let’s see, this isn’t table cloths—nor this either—now! Dear! What’s this?”

She draws it out, with careful fingers. A beautiful, light-blue dress—of the old sort, the kind from thirty, forty years ago, the kind Belle knows from the sketches of her mother. It’s a costly dress, for Mrs. Potts; it would have taken a year’s salary for a miller’s daughter to afford such a gown, though it looks plain enough in Adam’s hall.

Chip gapes. “Is it a fairy-gown?”

“No, dear, though it might have fit through a thimble once—my mother made this lace herself.” Mrs. Potts smiles, and fingers the fading fabric. “I got married, in this dress. To Mr. Potts himself. Pretty, isn’t it?”

“You—got married in this?” Chip’s eyes wander over the little English primroses embroidered on the silk.

“Yes, dear. My mother cried to see it.”

“Why wasn’t I there?” he demands.

“Luv! You weren’t born, yet.”

“Well, why didn’t you wait until I was born?” Chip is inexhaustible. Plumette hides a laugh, and Belle’s close-lipped smile tucks up in one corner.

“Oh, dear, it was such a long time ago. You wouldn’t have wanted to be there for it.”

“But I did! I do! Oh, mum, please! Can you do it again? So I don’t miss it this time?”

Mrs. Potts starts to say no. But then she remembers—don’t hide anything away—and Chip is so eager, so happy, as he holds the dress made by a woman he will never know.

“Well,” says Mrs. Potts, “my mother surely wouldn’t mind. She always said we’d have to do it again, do it proper, without the cats all crawling on the altar.”


She doesn’t let Lumiere help. Plumette, she does—“Because you’re a rational soul, dear, and don’t get these extravagant ideas”—but she keeps a steady order to things, and turns down the buckets of roses and the twenty bridesmaids and the gold-trimmed invitations the maid suggests.

“No, no, that won’t do at all,” she says. “We’re honest folk, me and Mr. Potts. We’ll get married in the ordinary fashion.”

“But a swan cut from ice is the ordinary fashion—”

“In Paris, maybe. But we’ll have a Yorkshire wedding, here in Villeneuve.”

So they trim up Pere Robert’s little church, and order in blackberry ice cream, the kind that Stanley makes himself. (he’s taken to new hobbies, since the old ones went out of style.) Belle researches old English vows, and together with Adam cobbles together some little promises the two old lovers can keep—to keep a steady hob, and love each other beyond curses and broken crockery. Mrs. Potts gets out the dress, and looks at the seams with a furrowed brow, and carefully lets it out an inch here, and an inch there. She washes the lace and tucks it up on a chair, with little rose-bundle sachets to keep it sweet.

Chip is everywhere. He cannot be stopped. The castle gives up on keeping up with him—he slips past Adam’s fingers, and skyrockets past Lumiere’s, and Belle can only get him to sit down after giving him peas to shell, or rings to polish, or shoes to shine. He is never happier than when his father asks him to pick out a proper corsage—“no enchanted roses, now; there’s my boy.”

The wedding is held on a morning. Plumette insists that late afternoon would be more fashionable, but Mrs. Potts maintains that afternoon weddings are always rainy. Never mind if that was in Yorkshire—she has a morning wedding, and Chapeau’s sisters help her get dressed.

Chip is perched in the front row. His legs won’t stop jiggling. He grins at the church’s high ceiling, and the fresh-scrubbed altar, and Belle standing there with her fingers on her lips.

Mrs. Potts looks beautiful. The old dress suits her perfectly; and Mr. Potts cries to see her, and opens his arms, and lets Adam give her away. Cogsworth dabs his eyes, and hands the two the rings—crafted to look like two clasped hands, and the ones they’ve worn forever, but shined to look new by Chip. And they say the gentle vows that Belle wrote, and Pere Robert blesses them, right as it starts to rain.

“Oh! This is lovely,” whispers Mrs. Potts, slipping on her ring. “My mother would be so proud.”

“I know she would, love,” says Mr. Potts. “And—oh! Oh! Dear!”

There are cats flocking all over the alter, tipping over the candles and strewing the bread. Chip stands by, an open sack in one hand, another cat crawling across the other.

“I thought,” he says, beaming at his mum and dad, “if I spoiled it again, we could have another wedding every year. Like your mum would want!”

And the Yorkshire rain—come just to Villeneuve to say hello to Mrs. Potts—can’t drown out the laughter in the little church.

[i’m running out of prompts!! get in here!!]

reigndrac  asked:

Sorry I sent my ask to ur main blog. How do you distinguish regular bloat, dropsy, and mystery bloat from each other? I'm trying to figure out what my betta has

Bloat from overeating looks like a swelling of the area behind the head (where the intestines are. It is TEMPORARY and goes away within 24 hours. There are no raised scales and it is symmetrical. You do not treat this with anything other than time. You can, if it is persistent, feed the betta a de-shelled frozen pea for a high fiber meal that will help clear the digestive tract faster. Do NOT “treat” with aquarium salt. All other forms of bloat WILL NOT respond to the “pea treatment”.

Dropsy is a full body swelling often (though not always) accompanied by raised scales, giving a “pinecone” look to the fish. It does not go away on it’s own and a fish may live for a day or over a month after swelling, but it is fatal. It is treated with epsom salt and antibiotics though it can have parasitic or viral causes.

(source)

Mystery bloat looks like the fish swallowed a marble. It too does not go away and only gets worse with time. No exact cause is known but it is treated with epsom salt, fluid aspiration, and antibiotics.

(source)

Pretty Enough

Originally posted by grboynews

Insecurities, no matter how big or how small, are a part of life. It does not matter how confident or comfortable that you are with yourself, it is inevitable that insecure thoughts will occasionally invade your bubble of positivity. They may not be frequent but they do happen and they can cripple the progress that you’ve made in coming to love yourself.

And for you, that progress had been enormous.

Growing up, you were not the most confident in your looks. There was always someone prettier. There was always something that you could change about yourself. You struggled for a very long to overcome those nagging, unwelcome thoughts. The journey was not one that could be completed overnight and you still felt the pull of insecurity drag you under from time to time, but you were doing better. You were learning to love the things that once made you so insecure.

Keep reading

Alistair’s Lamb and Pea Stew

“Now here in Ferelden, we do things right. We take our ingredients, throw them into the largest pot we can find, and cook them for as long as possible until everything is a uniform grey color. As soon as it looks completely bland and unappetizing, that’s when I know it’s done.”

Stew is a staple of Fereldan and, to a lesser extent, Alamarri cuisine. Alamarri cuisine tends to be much more interesting than Fereldan cooking, employing many more herbs and spices. To explain the difference, we have to go into a small little culinary history lesson as it applies to Thedas.

The movement from Tribal and Nomadic societies to feudal and city living caused a dynamic shift within the cuisine of Fereldan. Most farms belonged to the local lord, and thus were unavailable to the peasants working them. Fereldan freemen that worked the farms were limited to what they grew on their farm, minus their tithes and taxes to the local lord (who would in turn give some of those taxes and tithes to the king).

Gone were the days of foraging for herbs and hunting for game. Now, Fereldans were limited to what they had at hand. And for most, outside of the nobility, this was fairly little. Of course, they weren’t limited by our world’s limitations (potatoes and tomatoes weren’t introduced to europe until the middle of the 16th century). But that doesn’t mean they didn’t have their limitations. Spices like pepper, cloves, cinnamon, etc would - for the most part - be things that only the nobility could afford, as they would carry additional costs because of the export and import from places like Nevarra, Tevinter and the Anderfels.

This doesn’t mean that Ferelden was devoid of spices and herbs, of course. Edible laurels, juniper berries, borage, caraway seeds, parsley and thyme would all grow throughout Ferelden, The Korcari wilds and the Frostbacks. Rosemary is something that would not be very prevalent in Ferelden cooking, as it would mostly grow in the more temperate climates of Antiva, Nevarra, Rivain, and Tevinter. However, most Ferelden freemen would not have access to these herbs for two simple reasons: First, these herbs would be fairly expensive at the market unless they themselves grew them. Second: most ferelden freemen would have long lost the knowledge to forage for the wild variations of these herbs.

For most peasants, a stew would consist of perhaps one large onion, a few carrots, and a very tough piece of meat. Even farmers would most likely subsist on tougher pieces of meat, as they would sell the more tender pieces in order to make their living. Most Fereldans would most likely not know how to forage salt, and so salt would be something almost exclusive to the nobility. Therefore, most Fereldan cooking would be fairly bland, except for those smart few who knew how to get salt from other sources.

And so we come to the unfortunate reason why Leliana was so unimpressed with Alistair’s stew. However, to be fair, his stew was most likely rather impressive given what he had to work with. Unless the warden was carrying a personal chef in their backpack, whomever was doing the cooking most likely had to make do with whatever they could hunt or forage. This, of course, means that the party would most likely have much better food if their Warden was from the dalish - but that is neither here nor there as far as these recipes are concerned.

The following recipes assume that Alistair (or at least Morrigan) knew what they were doing in terms of foraging ingredients. 

For most recipes in this series, I will be using measuring instruments most commonly found throughout whatever region the recipe is from. For Ferelden cooking, feel free to use these conversions:

  • 1 small spoonful = 1 heaping tsp
  • 1 large spoonful = 1 heaping tbsp
  • 1 ladle = 1 cup
  • 1 mug’s full = 2 cups
  • 1 quarter bushel = 15 lbs, 2 gallons, 16 pints, or 8 quarts
  • 1 basket = 7 lbs, 1 gallon, 8 pints, or 4 quarts
  • 1 full pot (dry) = 4 lbs, 1.5 gallons, 6 quarts, 12 pints, or 24 cups
  • 1 full pot (wet) = 3 gallons, 12 quarts, 24 pints, or 48 cups
  • 1 bunch (herbs, etc) = 1 cup chopped, or as much un-chopped as you can fit into your closed fist without crushing any of it.
  • 1 bunch (plants): 1 full plant’s worth (for smaller plants), roughly 1 lb, or ½ kg (for larger plants)
  • 1 pot = 3 gallon pot / 12 quart pot
  • 1 large pot = 5 gallon pot / 20 quart pot
  • 1 very large pot = 10 gallon pot / 40 quart pot

As an added note: Hickory is not native to Britain, however Ferelden and the Free Marches have been shown to have many plants that are normally native to North America, particularly further up north where the climate is slightly warmer. Therefore, I feel justified in putting it here.

It should be noted that neither of these recipes will look especially appetizing when they are done (As the bone marrow and potatoes will turn the stew this weird uniform grey color). But if they are cooked correctly, both stews will taste delicious.

For an extra treat, consider serving either of these stews with a thick piece of freshly baked crusty bread and a generous amount of fresh butter.

All optional replacements are listed below both recipes.

Traditional Fereldan Lamb and Pea Stew
(makes enough for 30 portions, or enough for all DAO camp members to have 2 or 3 helpings)

  • 1 full Lamb shoulder, with neck attached (about 5-6 lbs), deboned and cut into large chunks, with largest bones reserved.
  • 4 bunches of carrots (about 24-30), roughly chopped
  • 4 bunches of onions (roughly 12 large onions), roughly chopped
  • 1 full pot of potatoes, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 fistful of lamb suet (roughly ½ cup)
  • 4 mug fulls of fresh green peas, shelled and cleaned
  • 1 large hickory root, roughly chopped and crushed
  • 2 mug fulls of brown ale
  • 1 half pot of water
  1. Place the hickory root in a very large pot with ¼ of the water. Bring to a heavy boil, and allow it to boil down until it starts to thicken. Immediately remove the hickory root and discard. Reduce the water until you are left with a black substance. Remove this black hickory salt and reserve.
  2. Return the pot to the fire and add your lamb suet. Once suet starts to render, add your carrots and onions. 
  3. Cook carrots and onions, stirring to make sure they cook evenly.
  4. Once carrots and onions start to brown, add meat.
  5. Once meat is browned, add potatoes, bones, ale and ½ of the remaining water (enough to cover by 1 inch). Allow to cook at a light boil until the water turns a brown-greyish color and starts to thicken. 
  6. Add your peas and just enough water to cover by 1 inch. Make sure stew is covered with a small bit of water during cooking, adding extra water when needed.
  7. Cook at a low simmer or light boil until the stew is full of flavor, and water has thickened to a nice gravy, and potatoes have started to break down. Most, or all of the bone marrow should have been cooked out of the bones and been absorbed into the stew.
  8. Add as much or little of the hickory salt as your taste desires.
  9. Remove bones when serving.

Casendz Wacancosÿn
(Alamarri Hunter’s Stew / Chasind Stew)
(A much more seasoned and herbaceous variant of the previous stew)
(30 servings, or enough for 10 people to have 2 to 3 helpings)

  • 5-6 lbs of shoulder, either lamb, venison, or bear
  • 2 lbs of large lamb, venison, or bear bones
  • 4 bunches of carrots (about 24-30), roughly chopped
  • 4 bunches of onions (roughly 12 large onions), roughly chopped
  • 1 full pot of potatoes, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 fistful of suet or butter (roughly ½ cup)
  • 4 mug fulls of fresh green peas, shelled and cleaned
  • 1 large hickory root, roughly chopped and crushed
  • 4 fresh bay leaves
  • A small handful of juniper berries
  • A small handful of borage leaves
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 1 bunch fresh mint
  • 2 mug fulls of brown ale
  • 1 half pot of water
  1. Place the hickory root in a very large pot with ¼ of the water. Bring to a heavy boil, and allow it to boil down until it starts to thicken. Immediately remove the hickory root and discard. Reduce the water until you are left with a black substance. Remove this black hickory salt and reserve.
  2. Return the pot to the fire and add your suet or butter. Once suet renders, or butter melts, add carrots and onions.
  3. Cook carrots and onions, stirring to make sure they cook evenly.
  4. Once carrots and onions start to brown, add meat.
  5. Once meat is browned, add potatoes, bones, ale and ½ of the remaining water. Allow to cook at a light boil until the water turns a brown-greyish color and starts to thicken.
  6. Add your peas and all herbs except for half of the mint, and add just enough water to cover by 1 inch. Make sure stew is covered with a small bit of water during cooking, adding extra water when needed.
  7. Cook at a low simmer or light boil until the stew is full of flavor, and water has thickened to a nice gravy, and potatoes have started to break down. Most, or all of the bone marrow should have been cooked out of the bones and been absorbed into the stew.
  8. Add as much or little of the hickory salt as your taste desires.
  9. Remove bones when serving.
  10. Before serving, add a small handful of the reserved fresh mint.

REPLACEMENTS:

  • Instead of suet, use butter or oil
  • Instead of hickory root, simply use 2 tbsp of salt and remove the process of extracting the hickory salt
  • You can use lamb, beef, venison or pork for either of these recipes. 
  • Dried versions of all included herbs can certainly be used, but the flavor profile will not be the same. There are certain flavor profiles that you get with fresh bay, juniper and borage that you simply cannot replicate with the dried variants.
  • You can certainly include celery in this stew if you want. However, this would traditionally be a fall and winter dish, and celery is a summer vegetable. If you want the flavor of celery without compromising the authenticity, then you can simply use celery root instead of celery stalk. However, because of the strong and sometimes overpowering flavor, celery and celery root would usually not be used in these stews.

Tonights dinner was conchiglie with creamy vegan pesto, peas, arugula, toasted pine nuts, sea salt, cracked black pepper, and lemon juice 

I made enough to take to work with me tomorrow for lunch, and I’m super excited to eat it again. For the sauce, mix two parts vegan pesto (like this or this) with one part plain soy greek yogurt or vegan sour cream. 

I like to eat this dish room temperature or chilled. It’s perfect for spring evenings! :) 

drimeth-of-bag-end  asked:

Would you be willing to do like shoutout or something to your followers on cheap ways to make your little beardie happy? I was given one as a birthday gift and have limited money so I know I'm struggling to give my lovely girl the home she deserves. I bought a 40 gallon tank but that still seems too small but I can't afford better at the moment (job hunting as we speak) I feed her fresh lettuces, pea shells, and broccoli daily and give her protein (dried bugs/pellets)ever two days. (1/2)

(2/2) I want to do better but as I have no money at the moment, is there any suggestions I can get from the community? I have a few climbing spots, a rock under her heat lamp, a little rock bridge, a “branch” (wood but not really good to climb on) and a hammock. She loves her hammock and will sleep on it or under it. I also try and give her a bath twice a month. Is there anything else I can do to make her happy on a limited budget?