she is a relatable character now

anonymous asked:

I'm working with a therapist on trauma related issues. I have text conversations with her almost everyday. The texts are usually about coping with emotions and they are very helpful conversations for me to have. They don't have a "bad" character, but I do tell her about urges and she tries to provide support so that I don't act on them. I see many people on here writing about how therapy should be kept at sessions and now I worry this communication is "too much" or bad? Any general opinions?

Maybe it’s cause it’s been a long, hard week and I ain’t got a lot of tact left but my initial response is seriously fuck anyone else’s opinion of your therapy if it’s working for you. I’m glad you find texting supportive. If you are worried about the frequency of contact, talk about it. If you feel it’s not helpful, stop it. Your therapist gets to make their own choices around boundaries with client within reason. I text some clients and not others. I know folks who text frequently. I know folks who don’t text at all. Hell my therapist texts me

The communication should be focused on you and your treatment (i.e. “omg client I just went on the best date” is major no no but “can you remember do your breathing exercise”). It sounds like it does. You keep doing what’s working for you. Talk about it with your therapist about how it makes you feel.

 Does It Pass The Aila Test?

We all know the rules of The Bechdel Test. In recent years, fans of more feminist-friendly films have included their own character tests, like The Mako Mori Test, The Furiosa Test, The Sexy Lamp Test, the list goes on. While these are all helpful (though comical) tools feminists have used to criticize media narratives, very few of them seem to empower or apply when viewing Indigenous and Aboriginal women in media narratives / storytelling.

As a Native woman, I’ve experienced disappointment and heartache from the way Native women were represented on film, television, cartoons, and other forms of media. From stereotypical “Indian princesses” to the distressing amount of physical and sexual violence in live action period pieces, it felt that a Native woman was not a character you were meant to love and root for. She was never a character you were supposed to relate to or want to be. In almost every role she’s in, she cannot exist without being a prop for another character’s story, and if she has a “happy ending,” it’s usually in the arms of a white colonist or settler.

I’ve created the Aila Test to bring my own concerns to the table when feminists criticize media. Not only should these issues be analyzed and addressed, but content creators who write about Indigenous / Aboriginal women should consider writing characters who pass this test. We need them now, more than ever.

To pass the Aila Test, your film / animation / comic book / novel / etc, must abide by these three important rules:

1. Is she an Indigenous / Aboriginal woman who is a main character…

2. Who  DOES NOT fall in love with a white man…

3. And DOES NOT end up raped or murdered at any point in the story.

Do you know characters that pass the Aila Test? Please submit them to this page!

Things to keep in mind WRT: Joey WLW subtext and her conversation with Xefros

The year is 1994 in Joey’s universe.

In 1994, LGBT issues were almost universally kept completely hushhush from kids. For example, “Ellen” was taken off TV and cancelled after Ellen DeGeneres came out, in 1998.

Even in the 2000′s, while great strides were made in open conversation about LGBT issues, I remember it was still VERY taboo to even acknowledge as existing. I was in high school through 2006-2010 and people would still whisper the word “gay” under their breath.

In the 90′s, the internet wasn’t really a thing. You had online bulletin boards that would take 2 hours to get onto and often forbade any talks of politics, sexuality, or the like. The only place you could find information on LGBT topics was the library, in old encyclopedias possibly from the 70′s classifying homosexuality as a mental disease, IF (and big IF) you could find anything at all. 

This persisted even into the early 2000′s. It improved somewhat during what I call the Forum Renaissance wherein everyone had their own more or less functioning web forum and were free to write whatever they wanted in whatever context they liked without having to cowtow to a company’s rules, but that didn’t start until around 2003 on.

Now back to Joey. 1994. Joey seems to live in a small town, with very little of a social ring (just her brother’s friends, apparently), and therefore very limited access to information.

Joey is 14 years old, clearly having trouble at school from her diary entries, and clearly very, very lonely. Joey, like many young WLW, particularly young lesbians (although not limited to just lesbians, of course), doesn’t seem to realize that being attracted to women is even an option.

This is a concept that resonates completely with me, in fact. I didn’t realize I didn’t have to force myself to like boys until I MET someone who was in a relationship with someone of the same gender. However EVEN THEN I still tried, because I was 13, and struggling, and wanted to be liked, and very very very afraid of how people would see me because I was already being bullied and just added fuel to the fire.

Joey’s questioning of Xefros actually echoes a conversation I, in fact, had once. Her quiet contemplation right afterwards is really telling.

Joey hadn’t realized, until this moment, that being in a relationship with someone of the same gender was an option. Joey’s life has been one of sheltered heteronormativity.

She accepted it very quickly. Now she can blossom. Maybe she’ll have a Thing with Xefros. Who knows? I sure don’t. Perhaps Joey is bi. Perhaps Xefros and she will become moirails. WHO KNOWS.

All I know is, her being a WLW is not subtext. At this point, it’s blatantly Text. I do believe Joey is a great realistic WLW character as well, and one that young struggling WLW might be able to relate to if they’re going through the same things as she is.

I know I related to her a lot. She reminds me of me at that age.

This is not Hiveswap’s team being homophobic or what-the-fuck-ever, and it certainly isn’t ‘qu**rbaiting’. It’s literally being realistic for the era, and I have full faith that they WILL address these issues people have over the course of the continuing story. A young LGBT character is allowed to question themselves and society on their own time. That’s part of what makes Joey so realistic.

After some thinking, I want to politely point out a few things to those of you saying Touka and Kaneki’s sex scene was rushed and meaningless.

Did kaneki and touka rush into having sex? Yes. But that’s entirely the point - in no way does that make it meaningless or perverted.

Kaneki and Touka have seen all of this happen before. Their hideout has been found. Their faces have been unmasked. Kaneki is the most wanted ghoul in Japan, and this is pretty much the beginnings of war for them. People are going to die. And they both know it can be either one of them at any time. Neither of them were going to wait for the “perfect moment, ” not when there’s a good chance that neither of them will live to see it.

What you’ve got to remember is that people don’t always make the best decisions when it comes to sex. More often than not, people get caught up in the moment and do it before they should do. This rushed nature is actually quite realistic. Even with Yorirko’s life hanging, Touka is keeping cool because she knows jumping to conclusions and being rash will do no good - she’s seen this before with Hinami’s mother.

Touka has experienced enough loss to know that she has to live for the living, and do whatever she can to keep those people alive. Sure, she’ll fight to protect kaneki, but that isn’t always what it’s about; with kaneki being suicidal in the past, she’s trying her best to give him an incentive to live. She’s letting Kaneki know that he’s loved even though she struggles to express anything other than her primal emotions. Kaneki needs to know that he’s loved right now. If there was anything more about Hide right now, it would be a bad turn for kaneki since he’d be living for the dead. It’s so important that he learns other people than Hide care for him that I’m shocked that people actually want Hide related stuff instead of this. Even though Touken wasn’t my favourite ship, I’m so happy because this is such an important hurdle for Kaneki’s character being overcome.

So yes, they rushed into having sex. However, I honestly feel this was a perfectly natural action for two broken people under pressure. They weren’t going to wait when there is a good chance there wasn’t going to be any other time for them. They both wanted to do it. Even if this is a sort of humorous thing to add remember they were virgins in their twenties as well; touka has done enough waiting on Kaneki, haha.

Please stop saying that their relationship is meaningless compared to his and Hide’s because it just isn’t true. The only other time Kaneki cried during a happy time was their first visit to :Re when he was so relieved to see Touka alive and he thought about what a beautiful person she was. After this, Haise gazed at her the same way Kaneki gazed at Rize - which Kaneki didn’t deny. If this doesn’t show how much Kaneki loves touka then I don’t know what will.

I’m honestly so proud of Touka for being so bold and collected here. She’s developed in so many ways. Sometimes, when written well, sex can really bond characters in books. While it remains to be seen, I’m really excited to see their relationship change and, hopefully, kaneki opening up to her by learning that people other than Hide love him. This is a good turn of events for both of them.

SO LET’S TALK “WHO’S THE TRAITOR” SOME MORE

If you’ve never read my initial theory post, please do yourself a favor and check that shit out. It is a foundation for the theory that, regrettably, was missing a lot of information that I wasn’t able to get to until I was able to do a reread of the series, plus I wanted to wait for the series to develop a little further. The original post was made right after “Deku vs Kacchan 2” was released, so we’ve had about 30 chapters of development. You might be wondering how on earth 3k words isn’t enough to make my point the first time, but here I am yet again! 

I might sound crazy, but believe me when I say… I am the MOST serious. 

Keep reading

Why "Night In the Woods" is really important

So with the recent rise in popularity (and @therealjacksepticeye ’s playthrough) , Night in the Woods has a lot of really important topics, I don’t see many people talking about these topics, so I’m here to bring them up myself

-Bipolar Disorder
-Depression
-Dissassociation problems
-Anger Issues
-Loosing a family member and having to grow up a bit too quickly.
-school even
-loosing a friend
-not to mention GAY

I don’t see anyone talking about how calmly it brings up these subjects, when you talk to Gregg by the lake, they don’t address bipolar disorder in a scary or negative way, and brings it up very simply as down days and up days. It’s an important part of greggs character and Mae accepts it and gives him comfort when needed.

Mae canonly disassociates (and even disassociates in game a few times), she talks about things becoming “just shapes” and reality not being well…reality. They bring it up in a really good way to explain it to people who don’t understand what it is or how it affects moods (and how it’s connected to depression). Mae leaves college because she was really depressed there, everything didn’t seem real, and she needed to get out. It’s important to note that Gregg (or bea) acknowledge what’s she’s experiencing and also offer comfort and support. It’s so important.

Bea’s mother passed away senior year of high school, she now has to work a lot to take care of her family, many many many teens can relate to this, wether a family member has to be at work to make ends meet all the time, and they have to take care of their siblings, or they themselves have to get a job and give up dreams to support their family. It’s shown and I’m glad it is.

Not to mention canonly LGBT characters, it’s confirmed that Gregg and Angus are Gay. Very gay. It’s also confirmed that Mae is at least bi (and develops feelings for a female character). LGBT representation is so so so important.

Forgot to mention: it’s Canon that Angus comes from an abusive household, and still has to deal with family issues ( Thank you to @themightypotatoqueen for reminding me)


This game is amazing and beautiful, full of good humor and dialogue, and so many beautiful moments too. If you had doubts about it, support it. It’s really great. 👌 thanks to Jacksepticeye for really promoting the game! Without your help it wouldn’t be as mainstream as it is now.

Q&A Jem and Emma

sarahalavi322 said:Hey Cassie, I was wondering why Jessa did not ever come visit the blackthorns/Emma. I know Jem sent little gifts and they were looking for kit, but 5 years of not seeing someone after you say you want to be there is a long time. Is there a reason why they are so distant besides searching for kit or warlock sickness? No one able to remember their wedding is throwing me off and it doesn’t add up. Jem is my fav character. I wish that he could be there for Emma more and it’s sad that he isn’t 😢

It is sad. Sometimes people are separated for reasons they can’t control, and sometimes misunderstandings play into that, as they did here.

Your timing is a bit off — Jem didn’t tell Emma he wanted to be there for her five years before he saw her again. He only saw her and introduced himself to her at her parabatai ceremony — two years before he saw her again (aside from a wedding none of the Blackthorns or Emma remembers, which is not a meeting). And unless I’m remembering incorrectly, he’s pretty clear then that he and Tessa are in the middle of a dangerous search, and I don’t think he intends or tries to get Emma’s hopes up that he’ll be there a lot — he knows he has to find the Lost Herondale first.

[Yep, updated to add:


““But I don’t know when I can be with you again,” he said. “Tessa and I, we have to find something. Something important.” He hesitated. “It will be dangerous looking for it, but once it’s found I’d like to be part of your life once more. Like a sort of uncle.””

That couldn’t be clearer. Once it’s found, I’d like to be part of your life. In no way is he suggesting he’s going to be there for Emma as an uncle/friend before Kit’s life is saved, which are exactly the priorities anyone who knows and loves Tessa and Jem would expect them to have.]

Now, we may know that Emma lives in a precarious situation with an unfit guardian. But Jem doesn’t — he doesn’t live anywhere near Los Angeles, or in fact have any permanent home, since he’s engaged in a worldwide search for Kit! As far as he knows, the kids all live a happy life with their uncle and their wonderful tutor, Diana. They lost their parents tragically, but so did he — and he didn’t need someone to swoop in and rescue him from his life with Will and Henry and Charlotte (who he considered as his real family — Jem would never think blood and a matching last name made people family; he would always think love and caring was the important aspect). Elias never really visited and Jem didn’t mind (more on Elias in TLH). As far as Jem is concerned, he’s something of an extra relative, and he’s not even sure how much Emma would want to see him and how much she’d think it was a kind of annoying visit from a distant relation. (She would love to see him, but Jem isn’t the sort to assume that.) Plus, Jem is only barely adjusting to life as a non-Silent Brother and probably doesn’t think of himself as a fit mentor for anyone. Now, I think he’d probably be great, but that doesn’t mean he thinks it. We can’t expect characters to view themselves the way we view them (”I am a popular character and will surely be welcome wherever I go!”) They’re going to have insecurities, and complicated feelings.

Lastly, looking for the Lost Herondale isn’t just because Jem and Tessa like Herondales. Kit isn’t even descended from Will. It’s partly because of a duty to the family, but partly because Kit is more than a Herondale: his heritage on his mother’s side makes him very important in the upcoming situations of TDA and TWP. Tessa and Jem knew they were racing against the clock to save Kit’s life before someone else figured that out: Jem didn’t think he had to race the clock to save Emma’s.

(Also a lot of times we wish that characters could be there to help other characters, but from a purely writing perspective, it would destroy the story. Julian and Emma’s story only works because there was no responsible adult around for five years except Diana, and she was forced to keep secrets that prevented her from changing the situation. It would have been nice to have Aline and Helen around, too* — it would have made for much happier characters, but unfortunately totally wrecked the story I had to tell about the consequences of prejudice and the results of growing up parented by a sibling. It’s not that no YA story can survive responsible adults blocking the kids’ attempts at agency at every turn, but this one couldn’t.)

*On the plus side, one of the fun things about writing Eldest Curses is being able to go back in time, so we’ll see Helen and Aline meet and fall in love in TEC.

Gem Class Analysis: Pearls

Prior to the recent Steven Bomb, some of the most divisive fan theory characterisations have been for Blue and Yellow Pearl. Theories would range from their having a close and intimate relationship with the Diamonds, to their being physically abused, to it sometimes being a mix of both.

And we can understand the source of what seems like a contradiction. That these Pearls, in particular, are serving the Diamonds directly puts them in a very privileged position, not exactly in the modern sense of the word.

That Pearls are in such close contact with the ruling elite makes them privy to the goings on of upper Homeworld that other gem classes would remain ignorant to. At the same time, they’re also living objects, dehumanised and treated as utilities rather than individuals.

It’s a unique position of power and powerlessness and, unconsciously, we as fans pick up on that; hence, the muddled characterisations of what their relationship with their Diamonds would have been like.

In the latest Steven Bomb, we got to see more of all of these characters and we know now that their relationship isn’t one or the other but somewhere in between.

“Oh no. It was very serious. When I still served Homeworld, I saw it myself.”

In that regard, I want to talk about how Diamonds and their Pearls relate to each another, and look at the implications this has for our very own Pearl, who admits she served Homeworld at one point.

1. The function of the Pearl class

To get this out of the way as early as possible, Pearls are being dehumanised. It’s not right to limit an entire class of gems to objects and prevent them from having individual inclinations, when other gems can manage some level of individuality. Pearls are individuals with their own capabilities, thoughts, and feelings.

Even before we knew about the Diamonds, the way other gems like Peridot initially treated our own Pearl showed us that Pearls are one of the lowest classes on Homeworld.

Words like “owner,” “stand there,” and “hold your stuff” were being thrown around. Not much was expected from them.

In light of all the new information received, a consolidated understanding of what Pearls were expected to do on Homeworld would help in the succeeding discussions. And what we know is that Pearls were gems created specifically to serve particular individuals. This service did not entail doing a job like other gem classes.

Other gems serve a specific function in servicing gem society as a whole. Like builders, soldiers, technicians, and leaders.

This public- or collective-oriented approach to organising gem society makes a lot of sense considering the way the gem life cycle is perpetuated.

The reason we don’t have gem classes specifically for private affairs, like the home life, is because their concept of “home” is much different from ours. Gems are born as full adults; they don’t need to eat or sustain themselves physically. That means a lot of our human necessities don’t apply to them.

That in turn puts the service sector of Gem society, where Pearls are, as something extraneous to functioning. 

It’s much the same for social constructs. Would the Ruby Squad consider themselves a “family?” Probably, but not in the way we understand the word. Instead of families, gems are groups into classes. And in these classes they socialise each other on what it means to be the gem they are.

The best example of this would be the soldier gems, who train each other and depend on each other in missions.

Leggy, the newbie “just born yesterday,” according to Rebecca Sugar’s early sketches of the Rubies, was being oriented by her more senior teammates.

Even though we felt threatened by the Ruby Squad, and Eyeball in particular, Leggy had absolutely no fears hiding behind the latter and it’s more than clear their shared experiences made them more cohesive as a unit.

In that way, gems don’t seem to spend a lot of time with gems outside their class.

The very “function” of Pearls is very different from that of other gems. Their work is relegated inward into the private sphere. They attend to very specific individuals. They are always with gems who aren’t like them.

And the key to this is the value system on Homeworld.

I talk about the utilitarian nature of Homeworld a lot of the time. So in a society in which utility is one of the key aspects, having work that is visible, like the creation of buildings or the colonisation of planets, puts a high premium on certain types of gems.

Service is invisible.

It’s not as easy to measure the impact of telling people they’re great everyday has on the rest of their lives. But this is the work Pearls do. Their work makes Pearls appear like they’re of even less use, which in turn puts them lower down in the eyes of individuals.

It’s very similar to how the work of medical nurses wasn’t recognised as legitimate until very late on in the history of medicine. Nurses comforted patients, checked on them daily, and attended to them, while doctors stepped in for a diagnosis and prescribed the treatment plan.

Because one involved something tangible and the other involved the daily grind of caring for another human being, the “usefulness” of latter was taken for granted.

It was (and in many places still is) very difficult to quantify the effects of their contribution and they were viewed lowly.

2. Servicing the Diamonds

Now to the specific question: What exactly do Pearls do?

Keep reading

5

July’s Featured Game: SLARPG

DEVELOPER(S): Bobby “ponett” Schroeder
ENGINE: RPGMaker VX Ace 
GENRE: RPG, Fantasy
SUMMARY: SLARPG is a short, turn-based RPG following the story of Melody Amaranth, a kindhearted but meek transgender fox who’s decided to learn healing magic and become a paladin. She’s joined by her adventurous girlfriend Allison, as well as their friends Claire (a sarcastic, rule-bending witch)(she is also trans) and Jodie (a dependable, somewhat motherly knight). Over the course of the story, our inexperienced heroes will meddle with forces beyond their control and find themselves responsible for the fate of their quaint little hometown. They’ll also fight some spherical frogs, travel to a forgotten land in the sky, befriend a robot or two, and anger the local librarian. But that should go without saying. 

Our Interview With The Dev Team Below The Cut!

Keep reading

ok but dave was always my favourite homestuck character and has managed to cling onto that title and sometimes i wish i could be a bit more original since he seems like such a cliched choice as silly as that sounds but just….. hes so much fun to read. 

his characterisation is so strong and consistent but it also develops. his flaws are so interesting and relatable. like today i was rereading openbound and his conversation with meenah. she goes about trying to convince people to go take on an evil almost unbeatable demon. and most people say  i want to, but its too dangerous, now isnt the right time, im not strong enough yet, or we’re making another plan, this can be plan b, but hell yeah we need to take this guy down!! 

then she asks dave and just nah. not interested. what does he want to do instead? draw comics. what has he been doing all this time on the meteor so far? finding ways to manipulate the afterlife - get this - in order to emulate one of his shitposty blogs, leaving his quotes around in ‘ebubbles’ like little easter eggs for people to find. despite most people literally being dead aliens who dont know or care about who he is. like its just so ridiculous. this kid is impossible. how insanely clever and creative and funny and yet so weird and apathetic and passive - why is he aiming so much lower in terms of heroics than all his friends? why is he so damn normal and desperate to ignore what is going on in the face of all this reality-threatening catastrophe in comparison for everyone else? 

also, may not be worth reading into, but interestingly meenah seems to account for his behaviour as being due to him ‘being down in the dumps’ or something which is just so odd since its not something dave ever really explicitly lets on and ESPECIALLY never says anything to meenah about it but implies that the ebubbles to her look sort of like… you know when ben makes that stop motion animation of himself when hes depressed in parks and rec? yeah, like that.

and he literally prattles about bro and dirk unprompted in that conversation too and also randomly brings up the fact that he also sometimes thinks about puppets (’#unrelated’) like argh

theres literally so much emotion and stuff buzzing around just below the surface and he NEVER makes it clear or explicit or easy, at least not for long but its all there and bits are always slipping out haphazardly like hes begging anyone, everyone, from his sister to some random alien ghost girl to notice, and its just so interesting

Svt as Studio Ghibli Characters

Scoups: Sosuke - Ponyo

“I love Ponyo whether shes a fish, a human or something in between.”

Originally posted by yyh

Jeonghan: Howl - Howls Moving Castle

“They say the best blaze burns brightest, when circumstances are at their worst.”

Originally posted by jihen

Joshua: Sho - The Secret World of Arrietty

“It’s funny how you wake up each day and never really know if it will be the one that will change your life.”

Originally posted by shishi-gamii

Jun: Haku - Spirited Away

“Once you’ve met someone you never really forget them. It just takes a while for your memories to return.”

Originally posted by auroras-boreales

Hoshi: Tombo - Kikis Delivery Service

“We need to find our own inpiration. Sometimes its not easy.”

Originally posted by thegirlreturns

Wonwoo: Seiji - Whisper of the Heart 

“The rough stone is inside of you. You have to find it… and then polish it.”

Originally posted by socionicsanimegifs

Woozi: Prince Arren - Tale of Earthsea   

“Life is a wave on the sea. Would you force the sea to grow still to save one wave?” 

Originally posted by lawlu

DK: Markl - Howls Moving Castle

“Here’s another curse for you - may all your bacon burn.”

Originally posted by neonearthtone

Mingyu: Shun - From Up on Poppy Hill

“There’s no future for people who worship the future, and forget the past.”

Originally posted by studioghiblishy

The8: Ashitaka - Princes Mononoke

“You cannot change fate. However, you can rise to meet it, if you so choose.”

Originally posted by darkwonderlandfantasy

Seungkwan: Asbel - Nausicaa Valley of the Wind

“Why does everything that’s good for you have to taste so bad?”

Originally posted by a-night-in-wonderland

Vernon: Jiro Horikoshi - The Wind Rises

“Who has seen the wind? Neither I nor you: But when the leaves hang trembling, The wind is passing through.”

Originally posted by socionicsanimegifs

Dino: Pazu - Castle in the Sky

“The earth speaks to all of us, and if we listen, we can understand.”

Originally posted by genarooz

Full Esquire Interview - CHRIS EVANS IS READY TO FIGHT

“HIS SUCCESS AS CAPTAIN AMERICA HAS MADE CHRIS EVANS ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S SURE THINGS, WHICH MEANS HE CAN DO WHATEVER HE WANTS WITH HIS FREE TIME. SO WHY JUMP OUT OF AIRPLANES AND GET INTO IT WITH DAVID DUKE?

BY MAXIMILLIAN POTTERMAR 15, 2017


The Canadian commandos are the first to jump. Our plane reaches an altitude of about eight thousand feet; the back door opens. Although it’s a warm winter day below in rural southern California, up here, not so much. In whooshes freezing air and the cold reality that this is actually happening. Out drop the eight commandos, all in black-and-red camouflage, one after the other. For them it’s a training exercise, and Jesus, these crazy bastards are stoked. The last Canuck to exit into the nothingness is a freakishly tall stud with a crew cut and a handlebar mustache; just before he leaps, he flashes a smile our way. Yeah, yeah, we get it: You’re a badass.

Moments later, the plane’s at ten thousand feet, and the next to go are a Middle Eastern couple in their late thirties. These two can’t wait. They are ecstatic. Skydiving is clearly a thing for them. Why? I can’t help thinking. Is it like foreplay? Do they rush off to the car after landing and get it on in the parking lot? They give us the thumbs-up and they’re gone.

Just like that, we’re at 12,500 feet and it’s our turn. Me and Chris Evans, recognized throughout the universe as the star of the Marvel-comic-book-inspired Captain America and Avengers movies. The five films in the series, which began in 2011 with Captain America: The First Avenger, have grossed more than $4 billion.

The two of us, plus four crew members, are the only ones left in the back of the plane. Over the loud drone of the twin propellers, one of the crew members shouts, "Okay, who’s going first?”

Evans and I are seated on benches opposite each other. Neither of us answers. I look at him; he looks at me. I feel like I’ve swallowed a live rat. Evans is over there, all Captain America cool, smiling away.

While we were waiting to board the plane, Evans told me that as he lay in bed the night before, “I started exploring the sensation of ‘What if the chute doesn’t open?’. . .”

Oh, did you now?

“. . .Those last minutes where you know.” As in you know you’re going to fatally splat. “You’re not gonna pass out; you’re gonna be wide awake. So what? Do I close my eyes? Hopefully, it would be quick. Lights out. I fucking hope it would be quick. And then I was like, if you’re gonna do it, let’s just pretend there is no way this is going to go wrong. Just really embrace it and jump out of that plane with gusto.” Evans also shared that he’d looked up the rate of skydiving fatalities. “It’s, like, 0.006 fatalities per one thousand jumps. So I figure our odds are pretty good.”

Again the crew member shouts, “Who’s going first?”

Again I look at Evans; again he looks at me. The rat is running circles in my belly.

I look at Evans; he looks at me.

Another crew member asks, “So whose idea was this, anyway?”


That’s an excellent question.

I ask Evans the same thing when we first meet, the evening before our jump, at his house. He lives atop the Hollywood Hills, in a modern-contemporary ranch in the center of a Japanese-style garden. The place has the vibe of an L.A. meditation retreat—there’s even a little Buddha statue on the front step.

The dude who opens the front door is in jeans, a T-shirt, and Nikes; he has on a black ball cap with the NASA logo, and his beard is substantial enough that for a second it’s hard to be sure this is the same guy who plays the baby-faced superhero. Our handshake in the doorway is interrupted when his dog rockets toward my crotch. Evans is sorry about that.

We do the small-talk thing. Evans is from a suburb of Boston, one of four kids raised by Dad, a dentist, and Mom, who ran a community theater. The point is, he’s a Patriots fan, and with Super Bowl LI, between the Pats and the Falcons, just a few days away at the time, it’s about the only thing on his mind. You bet your Sam Adams–guzzling ass he’s going to the game in Houston. “Oh my God,” he says, doing a little dance. “I can’t believe it’s this weekend.”

Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

Evans won’t be rolling to SB LI with a posse of Beantown-to-Hollywood A-listers like Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon, and Ben Affleck. For the record, he’s never met Damon, and his only interaction with Wahlberg was a couple years ago at a Patriots event. Evans has, however, humiliated himself in front of Affleck.

Around 2006, Evans met with Affleck to talk about Gone Baby Gone, which Affleck was directing. Evans was walking down a hallway, looking for the room where they were supposed to meet. Walking by an open office, he heard Affleck, in that thick Boston accent of his, shout, “There he is!” (Evans does a perfect Affleck impersonation.)

By then, Evans had hit the big time for his turn as the Human Torch, Johnny Storm, in 2005’s Fantastic Four, but he still got starstruck. As he tells it, “First thing I say to him: 'Am I going to be okay where I parked?’ He was like, 'Where did you park?’ I said, 'At a meter.’ And he was like, 'Did you put money in the meter?’ And I said, 'Yep.’ And he says, 'Well, I think you’ll be okay.’ I was like, this is off to a great fucking start.” Stating the obvious here: Evans did not get the part.

No, Evans will be heading to the Super Bowl with his brother and three of his closest buddies. Like any self-respecting Pats fan, Evans is super-wicked pissed at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for imposing that suspension on Tom Brady for Deflategate. Grabbing two beers from a fridge that’s otherwise basically empty, Evans says, “I just want to see Goodell hand the trophy to Brady. Goodell. Piece of shit.”

In Evans’s living room, there’s not a single hint of his Captain Americaness. Earth tones, tables that appear to be made of reclaimed wood. Open. Uncluttered. Glass doors open onto a backyard with a stunning view of the Hills. Evans stretches out on one of two couches. I take the other and ask, “Just whose idea was it to jump?” Since we both know whose idea it wasn’t, we both know that what I’m really asking is Why? Why, dude, do you want to jump (with me) from a goddamn airplane? “Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Settling in on the couch, he groans. Evans explains that he’s hurting all over because he just started his workout routine the day before to get in shape for the next two Captain America films. The movies will be shot back to back beginning in April. After that, no more red- white-and-blue costume for the thirty-five-year-old. He will have fulfilled his contract.

“Yeah,” he says, popping open his beer, “I don’t know what I was thinking.”

Back in 2010, Marvel presented Evans with a nine-picture deal. He insisted he’d sign on for no more than six. Some family members thought he was nuts to dial back such a secure and lucrative gig. Evans saw it differently.

It takes five months to shoot a Marvel movie, and when you tack on the promotional obligations for each one, well, shit, man. Evans knew that for as long as he was bound to Captain America, he would have little time to take on other projects. He wanted to direct, he wanted to play other characters—roles that were more human—like the lead in Gifted, which will hit theaters this month. The script had brought him to tears. Evans managed to squeeze the movie in between Captain America and Avengers films.

FOX Searchlight

In Gifted, Evans stars as Frank Adler. You don’t get much more human than Adler, a grease-under-his-nails boat-engine mechanic living the bachelor life in Florida. After a series of tragic circumstances, Adler becomes a surrogate father to his niece, Mary, a first-grader with the IQ of Einstein. He recognizes that Mary is a little genius, and he does his best to prevent anyone else from noticing. Given the aforementioned circumstances, Adler has witnessed what can happen when a kid with a brilliant mind is pushed too hard too quickly. Then along comes Mary’s teacher. She discovers the child’s gift, and a Kramer vs. Kramer–esque drama ensues.

During a moment in the film when things aren’t going Adler’s way, he sarcastically refers to himself as a “fucking hero.” Evans says the line didn’t lead him to make comparisons between superhero Steve Rogers (aka Captain America) and Everyman hero Frank Adler. But now that you mention it . . . 

“With Steve Rogers,” Evans says, “even though you’re on a giant movie with a huge budget and strange costumes, you’re still on a hunt for the truth of the character.” That said, “with Adler, it’s nice to play someone relatable. I think Julianne Moore said, 'The audience doesn’t come to see you; they come to see themselves.’ Adler is someone you can hold up as a mirror for someone in the audience. They’ll be able to far more easily identify with Frank Adler than Steve Rogers.”

Dodger. That’s the name of Evans’s dog, the one who headbutted my nuts and has since done a marvelous job of making amends by nuzzling against me on the couch. Evans got him while he was filming Gifted; one of the last scenes was shot in an animal shelter in Georgia. Evans had wanted a dog ever since his last pooch died in 2012. Then he found himself walking the aisles of this pound, and there was this mixed-breed boxer, wagging his tail and looking like he belonged with Evans.

Dodger is not exactly a name you’d think a die-hard Boston sports fan would pick. His boys from back home have given him a ton of shit over it. But he has not abandoned his Red Sox for the L.A. team. As a kid, he loved the Disney animated movie Oliver & Company, and his favorite character was Dodger. Anticipating the grief he was going to get from his pals, Evans considered other names. “You could name your dog Doorknob,” he says, “and in a month he’s fucking Doorknob.” Evans’s mom convinced him to go with his gut.

Right around when Evans was wrapping Gifted and heading back to L.A. with Dodger, the 2016 presidential campaign was still in that phase when no one, including the actor—a Hillary Clinton supporter—thought Trump had a shot. He still can’t believe Trump won.

“I feel rage,” he says. “I feel fury. It’s unbelievable. People were just so desperate to hear someone say that someone is to blame. They were just so happy to hear that someone was angry. Hear someone say that Washington sucks. They just want something new without actually understanding. I mean, guys like Steve Bannon—Steve Bannon!—this man has no place in politics.”

Evans has made, and continues to make, his political views known on Twitter. He tweeted that Trump ought to “stop energizing lies,” and he recently ended up in a heated Twitter debate with former KKK leader David Duke over Trump’s pick of Jeff Sessions for attorney general. Duke baselessly accused Evans of being anti-Semitic; Evans encouraged Duke to try love: “It’s stronger than hate. It unites us. I promise it’s in you under the anger and fear.” Making political statements and engaging in such public exchanges is a rather risky thing for the star of Captain America to do. Yes, advisors have said as much to him. “Look, I’m in a business where you’ve got to sell tickets,” he says. “But, my God, I would not be able to look at myself in the mirror if I felt strongly about something and didn’t speak up. I think it’s about how you speak up. We’re allowed to disagree. If I state my case and people don’t want to go see my movies as a result, I’m okay with that.”

Trump. Bannon. Politics. Now Evans is animated. He gets off the couch, walks out onto his porch, and lights a cigarette. “Some people say, 'Don’t you see what’s happening? It’s time to yell,' ” Evans says. “Yeah, I see it, and it’s time for calm. Because not everyone who voted for Trump is going to be some horrible bigot. There are a lot of people in that middle; those are the people you can’t lose your credibility with. If you’re trying to change minds, by spewing too much rhetoric you can easily become white noise.”


Evans has a pretty remarkable “How I got to Hollywood” story.

During his junior year of high school, he knew he wanted to act. He was doing it a lot. In school. At his mom’s theater. He loved it. “When you’re doing a play at thirteen years old and have opening night? None of my friends had opening nights. 'I can’t have a sleepover, guys; I have an opening night tonight.' ”

That same year, he did a two-man play. For all of the twenty-plus plays Evans had done up to that point, preparation meant going home, memorizing lines, and doing a few run-throughs with the cast. However, for this play, Fallen Star, he and his costar would rehearse by running dialogue with each other. Hour upon hour, night after night.

Fallen Star is about two friends, one of whom has just died. As the play opens, one of the characters comes home after the funeral to find his dead friend’s ghost. Evans was the ghost. Waiting backstage on opening night, he knew he didn’t have every line memorized, but he had the essence and emotion of the play down. Onstage, he remembers, “I was saying the lines not because they were memorized but because the play was in me. I was believing what I was saying.”

He was hooked. He wanted to do more of this kind of acting—real acting. He wanted to do films, in which the camera was right on him and he could just be the character, rather than theater, in which an actor must perform to the back of the room.

A family friend who was a television actor advised Evans that if he wanted to go to Hollywood, he needed an agent. Toward the end of his junior year, he had a ballsy request for his parents: If he found an internship with a casting agent in New York City, would they allow him to live there and cover the rent? They agreed. Evans landed a gig with Bonnie Finnegan, who was then working on the television show Spin City.

“I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

Evans chose to intern with a casting agent because he figured he had more of a chance to interact with other agents trying to get auditions for their clients.

The kid was sixteen years old.

Finnegan put Evans on the phone; his responsibilities included setting up appointments for auditions. By the end of the summer, he picked the three agents he had the best rapport with and asked each of them to give him a five-minute audition. All three said yes. After seeing his audition, all three were interested.

Evans went with the one Finnegan recommended, Bret Adams, who told Evans to return to New York for auditions in January, television pilot season. Back home, Evans doubled up on a few classes the first semester of his senior year, graduated early, and went back to New York in January. He got the same shithole apartment in Brooklyn and the same internship with Finnegan. He landed a part on the pilot Opposite Sex. Even better, the show got picked up and would start shooting in L.A. that fall.

“I know I’m going to L.A. in August,” Evans says, recalling that period. “So I go home and that spring I would wake up around noon, saunter into high school just to see my buddies, and we’d go get high in the parking lot. I just fucked off. I lost my virginity that year. 1999 was one of the best years of my life.” Until it wasn’t.

He wasn’t in L.A. for even a month when he got a call from home. His parents were divorcing. Evans never saw it coming.

Family and love and the struggles therein are part of what attracted Evans to Gifted.

“In my own life, I have a deep connection with my family and the value of those bonds,” he says. “I’ve always loved stories about people who put their families before themselves. It’s such a noble endeavor. You can’t choose your family, as opposed to friends. Especially in L.A. You really get to see how friendships are put to the test; it stirs everyone’s egos. But if something goes south with a friend, you have the option to say we’re not friends anymore. Your family—that’s your family. Trying to make that system work and trying to make it not just functional but actually enjoyable is a really challenging endeavor, and that’s certainly how it is with my family.”


the plane, a decision is made.

“I want to see you jump first,” Evans shouts my way.

Of course he does.

Like any respectable and legal skydiving center, Skydive Perris, which is providing us with this “experience,” doesn’t just strap a chute on your back. First, you go to a room for a period of instruction. Then you go to another room, where you sign away your rights.

You may be wondering how the star of a billion-dollar franchise with two pictures to shoot gets clearance to jump from an airplane—never mind the low rate of fatalities, as Evans has presented it. So am I.

“Well, they give you all these crazy insurance policies, but even if I die, what are they going to do? Sue my family? They’d probably cast some new guy at a cheaper price and save some money.”

Thinking the answer is almost certainly going to be no, I ask Evans if he’s ever gone skydiving before. Turns out he has, with an ex-girlfriend. Turns out that ex-girlfriend is now married to Justin Timberlake. Evans and Jessica Biel dated off and on from 2001 to 2006. They took the leap together when Biel hatched the idea for one Valentine’s Day. According to media accounts, Evans was recently dating his Gifted costar Jenny Slate, who plays the teacher. “Yeah,” he says, “but I’m steering clear of those questions.” You can almost feel his heart pinch.

“There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around.”

We end up broadly discussing the unique challenges an international star like Evans faces when it comes to dating, specifically the trust factor. Evans supposes that’s why so many actors date other actors: “There’s a certain shared life experience that is tough for someone else who’s not in this industry to kind of wrap their head around,” he says. “Letting someone go to work with someone for three months and they won’t see them. It really, it certainly puts the relationship to the test.”

In Gifted, there’s a moment when Slate’s character asks Adler what his greatest fear is. Frank Adler’s greatest fear is that he’ll ruin his niece’s life. Evans’s greatest fear is having regrets.

“Like always kind of wanting to be there as opposed to here. I think I’m worried all of a sudden I’ll get old and have regrets, realize that I’ve not cultivated enough of an appreciation for the now and surrendering to the present moment.”

Evans’s musings have something to do with the fact that he has been reading The Surrender Experiment. “It’s about the basic notion that we are only in a good mood when things are going our way,” he says. “The truth is, life is going to unfold as it’s going to unfold regardless of your input. If you are an active participant in that awareness, life kind of washes over you, good or bad. You kind of become Teflon a little bit to the struggles that we self-inflict.”

He continues: “Our conscious minds are very spread out. We worry about the past. We worry about the future. We label. And all of that stuff just makes us very separate. What I’m trying to do is just quiet it down. Put that brain down from time to time and hope those periods of quiet and stillness get longer. When you do that, what rises from the mist is a kind of surrendering. You’re more connected as opposed to being separate. A lot of the questions about destiny or fate or purpose or any of that stuff—it’s not like you get answers. You just realize you didn’t need the questions.”

This here—this stuff about surrendering, letting life unfold, taking the leap—this is why he wanted to go skydiving. It’s why that sixteen-year-old took the leap and did the summer in New York; it’s why he took the leap and turned down the nine-picture deal; it’s why he got Dodger. Surrender. Take the leap.

And so I go first.

Oh, one important detail: Novice jumpers like Evans and me, we don’t jump solo. Thank God. Each of us is doing a tandem jump. Each of us is strapped with our back to a professional jumper’s front. I’m strapped to a forty-four-year-old dude named Paul. Considering what’s about to happen, I figure I should know a little something about Paul. He tells me he used to own a bar in Chicago. Evans is strapped to a young woman named Sam, who looks to be twenty-something. She’s got a purplish-pink streak in her black hair and says things like “badass.” In fact, Sam introduced herself  by saying, “I’m Sam, but you can call me Badass.”

At the plane’s open door, my mind goes to my wife and two teenage sons, to those I love, and to the texts I just sent in case my chute fails. Then Paul and I—well, really mostly Paul—rock gently back and forth to build momentum to push away from the plane, to push away from all that seems sane.

Three.

Two.

One.

Holy fuck.

HOLY FUCK. This is what I scream as we free-fall from 12,500 feet, at more than a hundred miles an hour, toward the earth. Which I cannot take my eyes off of. I think about nothing. Not living. Not dying. Nothing. I simply feel . . . I have let go.

Suddenly, it all stops. I’m jerked up. Paul has pulled the chute, and it does indeed open. This is fantastic, because it means we have a much better chance of not dying. But it’s also kind of a bummer. I had let go. Of everything. I had chosen to play those odds Evans had talked about. I had embraced jumping and letting life unfold.

Now I had been jerked back. I would land. Back on the earth I had been so high above and from which I had been so far removed. Back in all of it.

Once I’m on the ground, safe and in one piece, a staffer runs over and asks how I feel. I say, “I feel like Captain America.”

The staffer runs over and asks Evans the same question. He says he feels great. Then he’s asked another question: What was your favorite part?

“Jumping out,” he says. “Jumping out is always a real thrill.”


This article appears in the April '17 issue of Esquire.

An Open Letter to People Who Say "This character isn't autistic," "Stop trying to take the character away from us," "They're just quirky," "Stop projecting onto the character," etc,.

Hi, as an actually autistic person, saying these things doesn’t automatically make them not autistic. The thing is, us autistic people have a point of view that allistics and NTs lack; we see those traits in other characters because we see them in ourselves.

And so what if it’s projecting? Let’s not forget about the other characters NTs and allistics project onto. People do that all the damn time and it’s totally fine. People have headcanoned Hermione Granger as a woman of color and now it’s almost a universally-accepted headcanon. But it used to have opposition. That’s how many great things start out.

Believe me, I didn’t used to think Luna Lovegood was autistic, but I had no idea we could headcanon characters as autistic. But when @silly-autistic-luna pointed it out (and I hope you don’t mind me tagging you in this), it started to make sense to me. Luna had officially become my favorite Harry Potter character before I found out about the headcanon and I even related a lot to her, but all I knew was that we were both outcasts. The possibility of her being autistic hadn’t even occur to me. So when I found out, how did I react? I said “Huh. I never thought about that.” But she was still my favorite character, even after that. In fact she became even more of my favorite character and I started to realize I kinda was Luna.

To say that a character is just quirky is saying “this character can’t be autistic because they’re loveable and their quirks make them loveable. Autism is a bad thing and should be treated as such, therefore we don’t want it anywhere near our precious angel.”

Aka, you’re ableist.


As for taking the character away? Autistic people are a minority. Even with the increasing statistics, much of the world is still allistic or neurotypical. There are billions of neurotypical characters in media and only a small handful of canonically autistic characters, especially for us women. By saying that a character CAN’T, under any circumstances, be autistic, that’s saying “we don’t care about your happiness or your need to feel comfortable in society like we do, so we’re going to deny you the right to relate to fictional characters even though we do it all of the time.”

Who’s REALLY taking the character away from who?


And if I’m still not getting to you, try this. Think of your most favorite character. The one you say you’d love no matter what. Now imagine that they ARE autistic. Would you still love them as they are? If not, you need to rethink your love for the character.

Especially if it’s Luna Lovegood. If Luna were to find out a favorite character of hers was autistic, she would still embrace it. She wouldn’t shy away from it. Her character embraces those differences whole-heartedly. If you say you love Luna Lovegood, but would question or deny your love for her if she was canonically autistic, you miss everything the character stands for and need to rethink your perspective.

-Savage/Informative Luna

Man, I think part of the reason it took me so long to realize I’m a lesbian is because romance stories SO OFTEN look EXACTLY like my past relationships with men. Like, literally indistinguishable, to the point where I can watch those straight romcoms now and very easily interpret the main characters as lesbians dealing with the overwhelming pressures of compulsory heterosexuality.

Like, first she is annoyed by the guy, okay? She has zero interest, she finds him tedious and sees no reason she should be interested in him, or she sees him purely as a friend and does not expect any kind of romance. Holy hell could I relate to that!

And then they’re forced together by some circumstance – his persistent interest or their jobs or being literally stranded or whatever – and it’s incredibly awkward but they eventually find a way to coexist together and she even discovers positive aspects of his personality. He’s not such a bad guy, he’s alright. And that happened in a lot of my relationships with men, too. I learnt to tolerate them and even appreciate their good qualities.

And then often without any kind of active choice on her part suddenly they’re in a context where he wants more from her.

And here’s where my interpretations of those scenes differed from what the writers intend. See, I thought the hesitations of those in-love heterosexual women were the same as my own total lack of interest and how I had to work myself up to perform romantic love – or sexual interest – for someone I wasn’t actually, it turns out, attracted to.

Because it looks, from the outside, exactly like the chain of events in my own relationships with men. When it seemed like I’d gone too far to gracefully extricate myself the right thing was to just… try my very hardest to be in love, to try to love the guy as wholeheartedly as all people need to be loved, or do my best to at least play the part.

And I thought that was what real romance was, I thought those were the usual internal workings of a woman deeply in love, to decide to try to love someone purely because she’d reached a point where he wanted more and she’d gone this far and how could she not? Especially if he’d made some big romantic gesture, or needed saving, or was less annoying than initially presumed.

“Love as a choice” made sense to me then in a way it was never intended to mean. I thought I was choosing to be in love with these guys. When straight women chose to stay, I saw them choosing to be in love. In the back of my mind I always knew I could flip my “feelings” off like a switch, but I chose to stay and perform love, and really I think I thought that was normal.

It looks so similar from the outside.

It took falling in love with women and realizing how different my feelings are for women to notice that, wait a second, was that love? Or did I just feel like I’d reached some kind of point of no return and had to see the relationship through because that’s what you’re supposed to do?

Let’s theorize about Star vs

Please be wary if you haven’t seen Into the Wand yet, as I’m going to talk about obvious spoilers.

I must say this episode gave us a lot of information to chew on, and luckily I have been sick and laying in my bed all day which sure gives me a lot of opportunity to mull things over.

So, assuming Eclipsa is Star’s grandmother, that would make her Moon’s mother. It’s very interesting that we now canonically have a queen that fell in love with a monster. Considering mewmans today are still at odds with monsters, I’m going to say the whole idea of the queen being in love with a monster didn’t go over well with the population back then.

The plaque says that Eclipsa was married to a mewman king, and presumably gave birth to Moon, before eloping with a monster (I find it interesting that the monster in the tapestry is noticeably wearing a ring on his ring finger). I imagine this happened when Moon was at a very young age, maybe she was even Star’s age, and she has grown a lot of resentment towards her mother and towards monsters over it. (Yay! She has mother issues!) Perhaps she sided with the mewman population and considered her a traitor, perhaps she put the blame entirely on monsters for stealing her mother away. It’s hard to say, this is all speculation, but it’s not hard to guess that Moon had a lot of negative feelings about these events.

Which brings us to this image

So it goes without saying that these tapestries are intended to depict a defining moment for the queen they are portraying, and boy is there a lot going on in this picture. First off there is the obvious proof that Toffee battled with Moon in the past. But there is something interesting in Toffee’s outfit upon closer inspection

His shoulder pads are skulls that have the same cheek marks as Moon and Eclipsa. This could have the obvious interpretation that he is an enemy of these two queens, but if you’re like me and love reading too much into everything it could mean that Toffee has a relation to these two in some way. And especially after seeing these tweets kicking around on twitter

There has been crazy fandom theorizing that Toffee is the son of Eclipsa and the monster she eloped with, making him Moon’s half-sibling. Juicy drama fitting of a spanish soap opera. It’s hard to say why Toffee was battling with Moon, maybe he was trying to claim the throne? To share it? Avenge his mother who was exiled from her kingdom? Maybe he’s not actually related at all and he’s just attacking the kingdom cus he’s an evil monster? Who knows.

Whatever the reason, Moon is attacking him with a ferocity and anger that we have never seen from her before. A character who we have barely seen crack a smile is now shown holding a vicious expression like this

With the plaque saying that she unleashed her “darkest spell” on Toffee. It is very clear that she has many personal feelings towards Toffee, for one reason or another.

My main thought that I get from all this is one thing: if it is true that Toffee is related to Moon, then this scene depicts a very decisive moment in Mewni history. With the last queen running off to be with a monster, the relations between mewmans and monsters was likely in a state of unrest. Moon had the power to either create a peace between the two parties, or forever sever them, making monsters the enemy of Mewni. In her state of anger and resentment over what her mother did, she released this dark spell, deciding that monsters do not deserve to be equals with mewmans. It certainly adds a lot of depth to her character.

This is all insane speculation on my part of course. I fully expect that when all is revealed in canon I will be proven completely wrong, but that’s kinda the fun part of theorizing.

I would not call “13 Reasons Why” incredible, or beautiful, or amazing. But I would call it real, and I do not regret watching it at all. I don’t think I’ll ever understand exactly why Hannah made the tapes, I’m not even sure that I agree with her doing so.

And I know a lot of people are upset with how triggering it is, or that they portrayed depression the wrong way. Because yes I understand that depression is a chemical imbalance. But when someone commits suicide, having depression is not always the reason.

Depression I know is the main cause to suicide, and you can’t control it. And maybe you’ve stopped reading this already but if not, just bear with me here for a second.

Hannah Baker went through things that unfortunately a lot of girls in high school have gone through. But if I read one more fucking thing where someone says that “they got through it so she should’ve” I’m going to riot.

I don’t think Hannah had depression. And anyone can correct me on this if I get it wrong I’m not trying to act like I know everything but from what I’ve read, depression is being constantly sad, tired, and empty without having a reason or not knowing what that reason is. A chemical imbalance.

Hannah knew exactly why she was empty. She knew her reasons. She was not depressed. She was scared, and violated, and broken down. But she knew exactly why she felt that way.

I wish she would’ve gotten help, I wish she would’ve told anybody about everything that was happening as it happened and not when it was all over.

But this show, I do believe It does have a message. I understand it was her choice, but every choice in life is led up to by previous events, sometimes those events are people.

Say that it’s an an awful show, you have that right. But don’t say that they portrayed what she went through the “wrong way” because a lot of people who watched this show really related to what she went through and were really affected not because of her actions but the things the other characters did to her.

So just understand, if you blame this show for doing it “the wrong way” you have now minimized the problems that those who relate to her character have gone through in real life,and they are not fictional.

Do not say bad things about Hannah Baker or how her character was represented on the show. Because there’s a real Hannah Baker out there, who probably has another name, and could’ve read your post about how “unnecessary and dumb” her storyline was.

The shows message was that what you say, and what you let be heard matters. Your words matter that you said negatively about the show and about Hannah and everything she went through.

So congratulations, you’re no better than anyone on the tapes. Except you’re real.

I hope that one day, all Hetalians will begin to realize that:

France isn’t a rapist, if he was, why would he have said, “Love isn’t something that should be forced upon others.”? Russia isn’t a psychopath, he is actually unaware of how cruel he can be. Romano cares a lot about his family, he just doesn’t feel the need to show it by being lovey-dovey all he time. Prussia likes Italy, it has even been said that he asked Veneziano out on a date, but Veneziano was oblivious to the confession (?). Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia aren’t weak. Being afraid of someone does not make you weak. You’d probably be scared too if you had to deal with Russia. Hetalia isn’t about yaoi.

Shipping wars are unnecessary, there’s no reason to fight over what ship is better. I’ve seen Hetalians tell others to kill theirselves because they simply just didn’t like a ship. Norway and Iceland care very much for eachother, they may have their disagreements here and there, but they still care about each other. Germany IS NOT the Holy Roman Empire. My evidence? Remember how it was stated that Germany was born into an EXISTING body? That existing body was HRE’s. While Germany has HRE’s body, he does not have the soul of HRE so therefore, is not HRE. I do try to respect other’s theories and opinions, people are practically trying to shove the “HRE is Germany” theory down my throat and I do not appreciate such actions. Belarus wasn’t originally designed to be Yandere; she was supposed to be more soft-spoken and kind, like her 2P. Or kind of like Liechtenstein. It’s been said that Hima doesn’t even know how she ended up as the Yandere character she is now. Spain is not a pedophile. Finland is not a coward, nor a useless baby. He’s quite strong. Despite his hard past, he managed to stay cheerful and optimistic. He’s not weak for disliking conflict, he’s suffered a hard past full of conflict. It makes sense that he would dislike conflict. Sweden is shy and isn’t that great when it comes to social activities, which his shyness is often mistaken as him being antisocial and emotionless. I relate strongly to Sweden since my parents often mistake my shyness and awkwardness as me being antisocial. Canada is not a suicidal pushover. And a lot more than what I’ve mentioned in this post.

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get to know me meme: favourite female characters → luna lovegood (the harry potter series)

“don’t worry, you’re just as sane as i am.”