sharpsburg

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Today marks the 155th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day in US history.

The Army of the Potomac, under the command of Maj. Gen. George McClellan, mounted a series of powerful assaults against General Robert E. Lee’s forces along Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17th, 1862. The morning attacks by the Union First and Twelfth Corps on the Confederate left flank, and vicious Confederate counterattacks by Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson’s brigades swept back and forth through Miller’s Cornfield, across the Hagerstown Turnpike and into the West Woods. Later, towards the center of the battlefield, Union Second Corps assaults against the Sunken Road pierced the Confederate center after a terrible struggle but failed to capitalize on their breakthrough there. In the afternoon, the third and final major assault by Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s Ninth Corps pushed over a bullet-strewn stone bridge at Antietam Creek that now bears his name. Just as Burnside’s forces began to collapse the Confederate right, the timely arrival of Gen. A.P. Hill’s division from Harpers Ferry helped to drive the Army of the Potomac back once more. On the 18th, both sides remained in place, too bloodied to advance. Late that evening and on the 19th, Lee withdrew from the battlefield and slipped back across the Potomac into Virginia. The bloodiest single day in American military history ended in a draw, but the Confederate retreat gave President Abraham Lincoln the “victory” he desired before issuing the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation five days later.

Sources: Instagram and civilwar.org

Monument At Antietam National Battlefield, Dedicated In 1997

The lineage of the Irish Brigade has been officially assigned to “Fighting 69th” of the New York National Guard, which is the only currently active military unit that formed part of it.

On September 17, 1862, the Union and Confederate armies met at Sharpsburg Maryland, in the Battle of Antietam. Command confusion led to the disjointed use of the II Corps, and instead of supporting renewed assaults on the Confederate left at the West Woods, the Irish Brigade found itself facing the center of the Confederate line, entrenched in an old sunken farm road. 

The brigade again acted conspicuously, assaulting the road, referred to after the battle as “Bloody Lane”. Although unsuccessful, the brigade’s attack gave supporting troops enough time to flank and break the Confederate position, at the cost of 60% casualties for the Irish Brigade.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Brigade_%28U.S.%29

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The Battle of Antietam (also called the Battle of Sharpsburg) began at dawn on 17 Sept. 1862 as 1,000 Union troops crawled through the cornfield near Sharpsburg, MD and Antietam Creek.

Confederate troops from Georgia were waiting for the Union soldiers, and as they emerged from the cornfield, the Georgians opened fire. The battle would last a little more than 12 hours, and when it was over, more than 23,000 troops were dead or injured, making it the bloodiest day in US history.

2,108 Union soldiers were killed and 12,401 were injured (25% of total forces), while 1,546 Confederate soldiers were killed, with 10,318 injured (31% total forces)

The Confederate soldiers retreated, but the battle was essentially a stalemate (the union soldiers outnumbered the confederate side almost 3-1, but Union Gen. George McClellan refused to employ all his forces). The land had no strategic value.

Lincoln became increasingly frustrated with McClellan, who failed to pursue Lee’s army after Antietam, finally relieving him of command on 7 Nov. 1862. Publicly, however, Lincoln proclaimed a Union victory at Antietam and used it to issue the Emancipation Proclamation on 22 Sept. 1862 (he had wanted to issue it earlier, but his cabinet urged him to wait until after a battlefield victory).

50 States Most Haunted

Each state in the USA has it’s own tales of haunted hotels, houses, and various other places. But each state has what is considered their “most haunted” spot. What is your state’s most haunted place?

1. Alabama - Sloss Furnaces (Birmingham)
2. Alaska - UAA’s Wendy Williamson Auditorium (Anchorage)
3. Arizona - Bird Cage Theater (Tombstone)
4. Arkansas - The Crescent Hotel (Eureka Springs)
5. California - Alcatraz Island (San Francisco)
6. Colorado - The Stanley Hotel (Estes Park)
7. Connecticut - Seaside Sanatorium (Waterford)
8. Delaware - Fort Delaware (Pea Patch Island)
9. Florida - Florida Theatre (Jacksonville)
10. Georgia - Kennesaw House (Marietta)
11. Hawaii - ‘lolani Place (Honolulu)
12. Idaho - Old Idaho State Penitentiary (Boise)
13.  Illinois - Congress Plaza Hotel (Chicago)
14. Indiana - French Lick Springs Hotel (French Lick)
15. Iowa - Villisca Ax Murder House (Villisca)
16. Kansas - The Sallie House (Atchison)
17. Kentucky - Waverly Hills Sanatorium (Louisville)
18. Louisiana - The Myrtles Plantation (St. Francisville)
19. Maine - Wood Island Lighthouse (Wood Island)
20. Maryland - Antietam Battlefield (Sharpsburg)
21. Massachusetts - The Lizzie Borden House (Fall River)
22. Michigan - Henderson Castle (Kalamazoo)
23. Minnesota - Forepaugh’s Restaurant (St. Paul)
24. Mississippi - Cedar Grove Mansion (Vicksburg)
25. Missouri - Lemp Mansion (St. Louis)
26. Montana - The University of Montana (Missoula)
27. Nebraska - Nebraska State Capitol (Lincoln)
28. Nevada - Virginia City
29. New Hampshire - Pine Hill Cemetery (Hollis)
30. New Jersey - Seabrook-Wilson House (Port Monmouth)
31. New Mexico - Highway 666
32. New York - The Amityville Horror House (Amityville)
33. North Carolina - Brown Mountain Lights (Burke and Caldwell Counties)
34. North Dakota - Liberty Memorial Building (Bismarck)
35. Ohio - The Ridges (Athens)
36. Oklahoma - Skirvin Hotel (Oklahoma City)
37. Oregon - McMenamin’s White Eagle Saloon (Portland)
38. Pennsylvania - Gettysburg Battlefields (Gettysburg)
39. Rhode Island - The Ladd School (Exeter)
40. South Carolina - Old Charleston Jail (Charleston)
41. South Dakota - Bullock Hotel (Deadwood)
42. Tennessee - Loretta Lynn Plantation House (Hurricane Mills)
43. Texas - The Alamo (San Antonio)
44. Utah - Westminster College (Salt Lake City)
45. Vermont - The University of Vermont (Burlington)
46. Virginia - Ferry Plantation House (Virginia Beach)
47. Washington - The Palace Hotel (Port Townshend)
48. West Virginia - West Virginia State Penitentiary (Moundsville)
49. Wisconsin - Summerwind Mansion (West Bay Lake)
50. Wyoming - Wyoming Frontier Prison (Rawlins)

Elbert & Louisa Jemison, Wedding Picture, Talladega, Alabama

 He was a Captain in the Confederate Army of Texas, serving in the 1st Texas Infantry. Shot through the lungs at Gaines Mill, shot through the hip and thigh at Sharpsburg, wounded slightly in left breast at Cold Harbor. After the war, he entered the Cotton Brokerage business and wholesale grocery business in Houston, Texas. He later purchased a seat on the New York Cotton Exchange, and was controlling stockholder and President of the Houston East Texas Railway Company, which he later sold to the Harriman Interest in New York, which is now part of the Southern Pacific system.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50245058@N03/6083696114

anonymous asked:

Could you give us a list of fun/interesting facts about William McKinley?

  • Wiliam McKinley met his future wife, Nancy Allison, when he was only a young child.
  • McKinley grew up on a farm with both parents being of abolitionist sentiment. 
  • He was prone to illness and depression. 
  • When the American Civil War began, thousands of men in Ohio volunteered for service. Among them were McKinley and his cousin William McKinley Osbourne, who enlisted as privates.
  • While in the army, McKinley would write letters to his hometown newspaper with details of soldier life. 
  • During the war, future 19th president Rutherford B. Hayes become McKinley’s mentor with Hayes’s style in dealing with the men impressing young McKinley and began a friendship that would last until Hayes’s death.
  • McKinley and his regiment engaged in the Second Battle of Bull Run, Sharpsburg, Battle of Antietam,  Battle of Buffington Island and many other minor battles. 
  • The first person McKinley ever voted for for the presidency was Abraham Lincoln for his second term. 
  • McKinley had a parrot named “Washington Post” who could whistle to the tune of Yankee Doodle.
  • McKinley married Ida Saxton in January of 1871. Their first child, Katherine, was born on Christmas Day 1871. A second daughter, Ida, followed in 1873, but died the same year. McKinley’s wife descended into a deep depression while Two years later, in 1875, Katherine died of typhoid fever. Ida never recovered from her daughters’ deaths; the McKinleys had no more children. Ida McKinley developed epilepsy around the same time and thereafter disliked her husband’s leaving her side. He remained a devoted husband and tended to his wife’s medical and emotional needs for the rest of his life. During their time in the White House, Ida often needed sedation to enable her to sit through official functions as First Lady, and McKinley would throw a handkerchief over her face when she suffered an epileptic seizure.
  • McKinley defended a group of striking coal miners who allegedly incited a riot at a mine in Tuscarawas Valley before tussling with the Ohio militia sent by Governor Rutherford B. Hayes. All but one of the miners was acquitted, and McKinley refused any compensation for his services.
  • McKinley successfully campaigned for Rutherford B. Hayes’ presidency.
  • McKinley was the first president to use a telephone to campaign. 
  • McKinley’s inauguration was the first presidential inauguration to be filmed.
  • Theodore Roosevelt, allegedly claimed that William McKinley possessed “no more backbone than a chocolate éclair”.
  • McKinley’s wife, Ida, disliked the color yellow so much she had all things yellow removed from the White House, including the yellow flowers in the garden.
  • He is thought to hold the record of the most handshakes for a president–2,500 shakes per hour
  • McKinley loved carnations and wore them as a good luck charm. While attending the Pan-American Exposition on September 6, 1901, he greeted a line of people. McKinley pulled his famous red carnation from his lapel and gave it to a little girl waiting in line. Seconds later, he was struck by an assassin’s bullet. McKinley died eight days later.
  • After Leon Frank Czolgosz shot McKinley, the crowd subdued him and began to beat him severely. The wounded McKinley shouted “Boys! Don’t let them hurt him!” Later, at the Emergency Hospital on the Exposition grounds, McKinley said of his assassin, “It must have been some poor misguided fellow,” and “He didn’t know, poor fellow, what he was doing. He couldn’t have known.”
  • McKinley was the first president to ride in an automobile while in office. After he was shot, he was transported to the hospital in an electric ambulance.
  • William McKinley died on September 14th, 1901, eight days after being shot and just six months into his second term as President.
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Pennsylvania Food Part ½

Pennsylvania is one of the only states with a unique cuisine, most of which was brought over by German settlers during America’s colonization. Some of this food has made its way across America in the forms of snack brands and convenience stores. The following are some restaurants and brands that began or are based in PA. 

Food Wars

Wawa v Sheetz

The easiest way to tell if someone’s from PA is to ask them what gas station has the best food. If they’re from the west, they’ll say Sheetz. If they’re from the east, Wawa. And if they’re not from PA, they’ll tell you they don’t eat at a gas station. 

Snack Brands

Sturgis; Snyder’s of Hanover

Pretzels were first brought over by the Germans, and the first hard pretzels were actually made in PA by Sturgis in 1861. Both of these local PA companies have since expanded their brand to various sweet and salty pretzel snacks, as well as other snack food.

Herr’s, Martin’s, Utz

PA has a variety of local potato chip companies, but these three are the best known.

Candy

Hershey’s 

Hershey’s is of course America’s favorite and best known chocolate/candy brand. Milton Hershey established his company’s town in 1905 in Dauphin County. Hershey, PA is known for the Hershey factory, hotel, school, and amusement park, complete with Kiss-shaped street-lamps. It’s also famous for those singing cows, and I hope you’ve got that song stuck in your head, because you know I do. 

Wilbur Chocolate Company

Living in the shadow of Hershey is this small chocolate manufacturer in Lititz, PA. It makes cocoa products for sale to bakeries, as well a line of chocolates for consumers, including their famous Wilbur Buds.

Just Born

This Brooklyn candy company moved some of its operation to Bethlehem, PA in 1932. It’s famous for Mike and Ike’s, as well as Peanut Chews and Peeps, both of which were acquired from local PA candy companies after the move. Every New Year’s Eve, Just Born drops a large candy Peep in Bethlehem, as the local version of the Time’s Square ball. 

Boyer

This small candy company is famous for the Mallow Cup, marshmallow inside a chocolate cup. 

Gertrude Hawk

This gourmet chocolate manufacturer in Lancaster County probably provided your fundraising material if you went to school in PA. They have many retail stores across the northeast. 

Tastykake

They produce a wide variety of packaged baked good snacks, similar to Little Debbie or Twinkies. (But better)

Other brands

Primanti Bros. Restaurant

This Pittsburgh sandwich shop started as a sandwich cart in the 1930s, and has now expanded to over 30 locations across the northeast.

Heinz 

This ketchup brand is an American favorite that was founded in Sharpsburg, PA in 1869

Turkey Hill

Founded in 1931 by a bottled milk salesman, this family company eventually expanded into a dairy and ice creamery. This Lancaster County company is now owned by Kroger. Their ice cream is sold nationwide, and there are a few dairy stores across the northeast. Turkey Hill is also famous for their iced tea. 

A-Treat Bottling Company

Established in 1918 in Allentown, this soda company temporarily stopped production in 2015. Now back on the market, this soda is famous for its traditional manufacturing methods and products such as birch beer, root beer, and cream soda.

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Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg, Maryland: It’s reported to be haunted. Apparitions are seen and some hear soldiers still fighting the battle including the sounds of gun fire, shouting, singing & strong smells of gunpowder. Some see shadow figures and light anomalies are reported in the fields

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Antietam Battlefield

according to wikipedia:  “It is a National Park Service protected area along Antietam Creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland which commemorates the American Civil War Battle of Antietam that occurred on September 17, 1862. The area, situated on fields among the Appalachian foothills near the Potomac River.”

according to me:  one of the most influential battles in the civil war, no doubt. like every other national park, it is kept almost spotless and virtually untouched since the day it was abandoned by soldiers. the landscape and its simplistic beauty seems eerie, however, when considering the bloodshed that occurred back in 1862. still, it’s a really cool place with a really insane history.