shalmaneser iii

4

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 2 “The Age of Iron”

Shalmaneser III -the god Shulmanu is pre-eminent- was king of Assyria (859 BC – 824 BC). During his reign he was capable of expanding the frontiers of the Neo Assyrian Empire, subduing most of the small kingdoms from the Euphrates in the north to the Jordan in the south. 

No king of Assyria left more royal inscriptions and annals than him. He also left several monuments to himself in highly visible places like the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser, erected as a public monument to glorify the achievements of the king and his chief minister.

In the statue, Shalmaneser III holds a mace which is a symbol of kingship. The symbols of the most important Assyrian deities (Adad, Shamash, Ishtar and Sin) are placed around his neck.

Istanbul Archaeological Museums, Istanbul,Turkey

The correction to that post was that at first I said the Indo-Iranian nomads who would become modern Kurds and Iranians overthrew the Neo-Assyrian Empire, when, in fact, it was the Neo-Babylonian Empire.

All I remembered was that the earliest recorded reference to Parsua (the ‘land of the Persians’) is from the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III, who was Assyrian, so…

But yeah, just realized my mistake, and as usual if anyone sees anything else, please point it out.

The signs as Ancient Monarchs

Aries: King David of Israel

Taurus: Pharaoh Ramses II of Egypt

Gemini: King Hammurabi of Babylon

Cancer: King Shalmaneser III of Assyria

Leo: King Leonidas II of Sparta

Virgo: Queen Cleopatra of The Seleucid Empire

Libra: King Alexander III of Macedon

Scorpio: Emperor Qin Shi Huang of China

Sagittarius: King Cyrus of Persia

Capricorn: Emperor Sujin of Japan

Aquarius: King Eglon of Moab

Pisces: Queen Elizabeth II of England

4

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 2 “The Age of Iron”

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III; the king receiving tribute.

Shalmaneser III was king of Assyria (reigned 858(9) - 824 BC). During his reign he was capable of expanding the frontiers of the Neo Assyrian Empire. No king of Assyria left more royal inscriptions and annals than him.

The black limestone monument was discovered by the archaeologist Henry Layard in 1846, in the ruins of the palace of Shalmaneser III, at ancient Kalhu (or Calah; Nimrud), northern Iraq.  It was erected as a public monument in 825 BC -at a time of civil war. It contains many panels glorifying the achievements of King Shalmaneser III and his chief minister. It lists their military campaigns and the tribute they received from their neighbours, including camels, monkeys, elephants and a rhinoceros.

The Black Obelisk is one of the most important discoveries in Biblical Archaeology because the second register from the top depicts the king of Israel Jehu, or possibly one of his servants, bringing gifts to Shalmaneser and kneeling at his feet (in around 841 BC). The king -or servant- is represented adopting the position recommended in the presence of the king’s dazzling melammu -this Assyrian word means literally: “the shining radiance that flashed forth from the king and placed terror in the hearts of his enemies”. The importance of the melammu is emphasized in the inscriptions, annals and bas-reliefs through which the Assyrian monarchs recorded their mighty deeds.

The relief is the earliest surviving picture of an Israelite. The inscription above the scene, written in Assyrian cuneiform, reads:

“The tribute of Jehu, son of Omri, silver, gold, bowls of gold, chalices of gold, cups of gold, vases of gold, lead, a sceptre for the king, and spear-shafts, I have received.”

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser, British Museum, London, UK

5

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 2 “The Age of Iron”

At the mouth of the Dog River (Nahr el Kelb - the ancient Lycus River), near Beirut, an Assyrian king (some scholars believe it was Shalmaner III) erected a monument to himself and boasted of the tribute he had received from his victims.

Countless armies from the ancient Egyptians to the British and Napoleon’s French have crossed the Dog River in the ensuing millennia each leaving their own monument to mark their passing.

PART II

Dog River - Nahr el Kelb, Beirut, Lebanon

5

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 2 “The Age of Iron”

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III.

Shalmaneser III was king of Assyria (859 BC – 824 BC). During his reign he was capable of expanding the frontiers of the Neo Assyrian Empire and he was first Assyrian king to go to war with Israel.

No king of Assyria left more royal inscriptions and annals than him. The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser was erected as a public monument in 825 BC at a time of civil war. The relief sculptures glorify the achievements of the king and his chief minister. It lists their military campaigns of thirty-one years and the tribute they exacted from their neighbours: including camels, monkeys, an elephant and a rhinoceros. Assyrian kings often collected exotic animals and plants as an expression of their power. One of the scenes of tribute includes the earliest surviving picture of an Israelite: the Biblical Jehu, king of Israel, brought or sent his tribute in around 841 BC.

PART I

Statue of Shalmaneser III at Istanbul Archaeological Museums, Istanbul,Turkey

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser, The British Museum, London, UK