shaft 1971

2

EMEMBERING GORDON ROGER ALEXANDER BUCHANAN PARKS (November 30, 1912 - March 7, 2006)
Gordon Roger Alexander Buchanan Parks was an African-American photographer, filmmaker, writer and composer who used his prodigious, largely self-taught talents to chronicle the African-American experience and to retell his own personal history. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film, Shaft. In 1948, Parks became a staff photographer for Life magazine, the FIRST African American to hold that position. Parks, who remained with the magazine until 1972, became known for his portrayals of ghetto life, black nationalists, and the civil rights movement. A photo-essay about a child from a Brazilian slum was expanded into a television documentary (1962) and a book with poetry (1978), both titled Flavio. Parks was also noted for his intimate portraits of such public figures as Ingrid Bergman, Barbra Streisand, Gloria Vanderbilt, and Muhammad Ali. Gordon Roger Alexander Buchanan Parks received the: Spingarn Medal · National Medal of Arts · NAACP Image Award – Hall of Fame Award (1984) and
Gordon Roger Alexander Buchanan Parks was born in Fort Scott, Kansas on November 30, 1912. He died March 7, 2006, in New York City, New York at the age of 93.

buzzfeed.com
70 Classic Black Films Everyone Should See At Least Once
♬ "Do you know where you're going to?"♬ Here are 70 of the most iconic black films, through the year 2000.
By Kelley L. Carter

this list ignores the last 15 years of movies, but that makes sense. if we’re going to talk about “classics”, we have to give the movies time to become classics.

legend ( italicized - seen it, bold- have a copy of it too)

  1. Carmen Jones (1954)
  2. Imitation of Life (1959)
  3. Raisin in the Sun (1961)
  4. Shaft (1971)
  5. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971)
  6. Super Fly (1972)
  7. Lady Sings the Blues (1972)
  8. The Mack (1973)
  9. Coffy (1973)
  10. Black Caesar (1973)
  11. Cleopatra Jones (1974)
  12. Foxy Brown (1974)
  13. Claudine (1974)
  14. Uptown Saturday Night (1974)
  15. Cornbread, Earl and Me (1975)
  16. Dolemite (1975)
  17. Cooley High (1975)
  18. Mahogany (1975)
  19. Sparkle (1976)
  20. Car Wash (1976)
  21. The Wiz (1978)
  22. Breakin’ (1984)
  23. Beat Street (1984)
  24. A Soldier’s Story (1984)
  25. Purple Rain (1984)
  26. Krush Groove (1985)
  27. The Color Purple (1985)
  28. Hollywood Shuffle (1987)
  29. Raw (1987)
  30. School Daze (1988)
  31. Coming to America (1988)
  32. Lean On Me (1989)
  33. Glory (1989)
  34. Do the Right Thing (1989)
  35. Harlem Nights (1989)
  36. Mo’ Better Blues (1989)
  37. House Party (1990)
  38. The Five Heartbeats (1991)
  39. Jungle Fever (1991)
  40. Strictly Business (1991)
  41. Boyz n the Hood (1991)
  42. New Jack City (1991)
  43. White Men Can’t Jump (1992)
  44. Bebe’s Kids (1992) (used to have this on VHS lol)
  45. Boomerang (1992)
  46. Malcolm X (1992)
  47. Juice (1992)
  48. Class Act (1992)
  49. What’s Love Got to Do With It (1993)
  50. CB4 (1993)
  51. Posse (1993)
  52. Poetic Justice (1993)
  53. Menace II Society (1993)
  54. Jason’s Lyric (1994)
  55. A Low Down Dirty Shame (1994)
  56. Tales From the Hood (1995)
  57. Bad Boys (1995)
  58. Friday (1995)
  59. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
  60. Higher Learning (1995)
  61. Set It Off (1996)
  62. Hav Plenty (1998)
  63. Eve’s Bayou (1997)
  64. Love Jones (1997)
  65. Soul Food (1997)
  66. Belly (1998)
  67. How Stella Got Her Groove Back (1998)
  68. The Best Man (1999)
  69. The Wood (1999)
  70. Love & Basketball (2000)

of course she couldn’t get ALL of the movies on here… but some notable misses :

  • The Temptations (1998)
  • Why Do Fools Fall In Love (1998)
  • Dead Presidents (1995)
  • Polly (1989)
  • A Hero Ain’t Nothing But A Sandwich (1978)
  • The Marva Collins Story (1981)
  • Sister Act II (1993)
  • Hoodlum (1997)
  • Women of Brewster Place (1989) 
  • Little Richard (2000)
  • Bamboozled (2000)
  • I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988)
  • The Jacksons: An American Dream (1992)
  • Introducing Dorothy Dandridge (1999)
  • Preacher’s Wife (1996)
  • The Bodyguard (1992)
  • Mo Money (1992) (ok maybe not so notable, but yeah)
  • Blankman (1994)
  • The 6th Man (1997)

November 30—Happy Birthday Mr. Gordon Parks.

Gordon Parks (November 30, 1912 – March 7, 2006) was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film Shaft.

Parks is remembered for photography, film making, music composition, and writing. He also is known for his activism and campaigning for civil rights. He was the first African American to work at Life magazine and the first to write, direct, and score a Hollywood film. He was profiled in the 1967 documentary The Weapons of Gordon Parks, by American filmmaker Warren Forma.

Parks was a co-founder of Essence magazine. He was one of the early contributors to the style of movies that became known as the blaxploitation genre, in which negative stereotypes of black males being involved with drugs, violence and women, were exploited for commercially-successful films featuring black actors.

Parks said that freedom was the theme of all of his work. He described it as, “Not allowing anyone to set boundaries, cutting loose the imagination, and then making the new horizons.”

Parks’ son, Gordon Parks, Jr. (1934–1979) also directed films, including Super Fly, Three the Hard Way, and Aaron Loves Angela. His career was cut short when he died in a plane crash in Africa.

In 1995 Parks announced that he would donate his papers and entire artistic collection to the Library of Congress and one year later, “The Gordon Parks Collection” was curated.

Daily inspiration. Discover more photos at http://justforbooks.tumblr.com

Remembering Gordon Parks

Born on this day November 30th, in 1912.

Gordon Parks (1912–2006) was a groundbreaking photographer, writer, composer, activist, and film director. He may be best known for his photo essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film Shaft

Parks was only sixteen when he moved from Kansas to St. Paul, Minnesota, after his mother’s death. There, homeless and hungry, he began his fight to survive, to educate himself, and to fulfill his potential dream. This compelling autobiography A Choice of Weapons, first published in 1966, now back in print by popular demand and with a new foreword by Wing Young Huie, tells how Parks managed to escape the poverty and bigotry around him and to launch his distinguished career by choosing the weapons given him by “a mother who placed love, dignity, and hard work over hatred.” Parks, the first African American to work at Life magazine and the first to write, direct, and score a Hollywood film, told an interviewer in 1999, “I saw that the camera could be a weapon against poverty, against racism, against all sorts of social wrongs. I knew at that point I had to have a camera.”