shaar

Gunaah ka bhoj jo gardaan pai hum utaa ke chale

Khuda ke ahge khijalat se, sar jhuka ke chale

Milla jinay unay ustaad-e-gi se aauj mila

Unhi nay khayi hai tauhkar, jo sar uta ke chale

Anees, daam ka bharoosa nahi, tehr jao

Chiraag laykay kahan samne hawa ke chale?

— Mir Anees

Shaar oil field back with the Syrian Army soon

Official Syrian news channels just announced that the Syrian Army was able to regain control of most of Al Shaar oil field that the ISIS attacked and seized control over it few days ago.

Getting back this oil field is very important to the Syrian people as it feeds most of the electricity stations that supply Homs and Damascus.

Soon it will back to the Syrians and the blackouts will stop 

Sons of the father
Damian, Skaar and Daken …..sons of three of the most well known heroes in comic industry ( Batman, Hulk and Wolverine respectively). Are they destined to rule the earth after their fathers have died? will they take up the mantle and fight the good fight? or will they try to tear down want their fathers have tried so hard up hold any chance they get? 

At this point Damian is trying to do the right thing somewhat by becoming Robin and assisting in his father’s crusade against crime. However he still has that assassin’s mentality and would kill where his father would not. 

Daken has proven that he is the total opposite to Wolverine and he is willing to do what it takes to end his father. No father/son bonding has gotten through to him but his goals are clear, destroy his father and build an empire unheard of. 

Skaar came to earth to kill his father for the death of his mother and the destruction caused on his home world. Giving the chance and the resources Skaar would have destroyed the earth to achieve his goals however he has taken to the side of good (for now).

These three are just examples of the children some heroes produce that can make this world a better place or bring it to it’s knees.




#Syria : this child’s face tells you all you need to know about Assad’s reforms.

A frightened child stands in the street after a Syrian government artillery shell destroyed his family home in the Shaar neighbourhood of Aleppo, on October 13, 2012. Syria’s army retook control on October 14, 2012, of a historic mosque in second city Aleppo after fierce clashes with rebels in and around the area, a military official and an observer group said. (Zac Baillie/AFP/Getty Images)

youtube

07/08/2012 Aleppo, #Syria *EXTREMELY GRAPHIC*: Leg amputation surgery was done to an injured civilian in Al-Shaar field hospital in Aleppo.

Russia just helped the Assad regime accomplish 'in a few days what it had failed to do over 3 years'

(Abdalrhman Ismail/Reuters)
Residents inspect damage after airstrikes by pro-Syrian government forces in the rebel held Al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria on February 4, 2016.

Over the past week, the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad seized several villages north of Aleppo, the country’s largest city and one of the last remaining strongholds of Syria’s non-jihadist rebels, in a development that threatens to escalate the horrors of the Syrian civil war.

Thanks to heavy Russian air support, the regime “succeed[ed] in a few days in what it had failed to do for over three years,” according to an Atlantic Council analysis by Faysal Itani and Hossam Abouzahr. It severed rebel supply lines into Turkey and threatens to encircle the remaining opposition-held territory. 

Aleppo was always a checkerboard of military forces, divided between regime, opposition, and jihadist zones. No one camp has had the ability to fully control a city that had a pre-war population of more than 2 million.

As it is, the Assad regime has suffered from manpower and budgetary shortages. And Assad’s Iranian allies have taken substantial losses of their own, including several high-ranking Revolutionary Guards Corps officers. Meanwhile, Hezbollah, Iran’s proxy force in neighboring Lebanon, may have had one-third of its fighters killed or injured in Syria.

But the regime is making progress even amid this ambiguous ground-level situation. And a humanitarian catastrophe might be in the offing:

#BREAKINGNEWS#ALEPPO IS CUT OFF FROM ITS LIFELINE TO #TURKEY
CLOSE TO A MILLION CIVILIANS ARE DOOMED.#Syria pic.twitter.com/sGKVJJwIE1

— Julian Röpcke (@JulianRoepcke)

February 3, 2016

In recent days, thousands of people have reportedly fled Aleppo. Video posted on social media has shown civilians streaming out of the city:

Civilians fleeing #Aleppo after #Assad’s Iranian and Russian backed loyalists look to set siege to it. #SawaAlAssad pic.twitter.com/HIcyI7ot7l

— Mr. Green (@Mario_Greenly)

February 4, 2016

Reuters put the exodus in the “tens of thousands,” citing an opposition source claiming that Russian aircraft had carried out 250 strikes around the city in the span of a single day.

The Assad regime is now in a position where it could try to recapture the city. Itani and Abouzahr said they believe Assad could decide to “freeze the Aleppo city frontlines” and refocus on other pockets of non-jihadist resistance as part of a larger strategy of “isolating the opposition into manageable pockets and dealing with each individually.”

As Aron Lund, editor of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Syria in Crisis website, explained to Business Insider, the Assad regime isn’t in immediate danger of recapturing the country’s largest city — although its battlefield tactics would be highly destructive.

“I imagine a government reconquest of Aleppo would be a slow process involving both military assaults and bombings, siege tactics and pressure on the civilian population, and, ultimately, political deals with those factions willing to bargain,” Lund told Business Insider in an email, adding that it’s conceivable it could take the regime “many years” to fully retake the city.

(Thomson Reuters)
Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad is seen during an interview in Damascus

But Assad might not even need to conquer Aleppo to achieve its most important battlefield objective: crushing the country’s non-jihadist resistance, leaving western powers without an anti-regime force they can support and cornering the international community into a de-facto alliance with his regime.

“If the government manages to retake and secure eastern Aleppo, which is still a big if, I think the rebels are pretty much out of the game — as long as the government itself remains in the game,” Lund said. A rebel defeat in the city "would presumably have a devastating effect on international and Syrian confidence in the rebels’ ability to win the war or even wring real concessions from Assad,“ he added.

A regime victory in Aleppo could be the final defeat to any remaining US or Western strategy of propping the country’s non-jihadist opposition groups.

”I can’t imagine that anyone seeing Aleppo slip out of rebel hands after these past four horrifying years would just say, well, bad luck, let’s send some more guns into Syria and have another go at it,“ Lund told Business Insider.

(Reuters)
Fighters loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad celebrate with residents of Nubul and al-Zahraa after breaking the siege of their towns, northern Aleppo countryside, Syria, in this handout picture provided by SANA, the Syrian state-run media organization, on February 4, 2016.

The regime’s Aleppo encirclement motions toward what once seemed to be an unthinkable endgame in Syria: the permanent partition of the country between regime and jihadist-held spheres, with Assad as the country’s most seemingly viable source of long-term authority and no remaining force committed to the idea of Syria as a unified or coherent national entity.

But it would be a mistake to think of such a scenario as an "endgame." Even if Assad prevails in Aleppo, his regime will still be fundamentally weak and almost totally dependent on the direct military support of outside powers. A possible rebel defeat might also work to the advantage of jihadist groups like Jabhat al-Nusra and ISIS, which are still committed to fighting the Syrian regime, and which continue to control substantial territory.

The regime has had moments of relative strength and impending collapse throughout a now four-plus-year-long conflict — none of which have made the Syrian civil war any shorter or less deadly.

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Syrian opposition talks ‘balance of power on ground’

Syrian opposition talks ‘balance of power on ground’

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Stalls are seen on a street beside damaged buildings in the rebel held al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria, February 10, 2016.

The Saudi-backed Syrian opposition on Wednesday said it “prioritized” a political solution for the bloody conflict marring the country but also said “there needs to be a balance of power on ground” after President Bashar al-Assad’s regime made advances with Russian…

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#Syria rebels say captured 100 troops: activists

27/07/2012

Syrian rebels say they have captured 100 regime soldiers and militia members during fighting in the city of Aleppo in the north of the country, according to a video distributed by Syrian activists on Friday.

The video, which shows dozens of men in civilian clothing seated in a courtyard, was filmed by a man who describes himself as a member of the rebel Free Syrian Army.

The captured men tell the camera that they are members of the Syrian army and the “shabiha” pro-regime militia.

“I am Colonel Mohammed Rashid Mohammed al-Mhmeid… I was arrested at the entrance of Aleppo,” one of the men says.

“I am Captain Fuad al-Hosh, commander of the Aleppo police in Shaar district. I was captured when I left my post,” another said.

One man identified himself as a member of the shabiha, saying he was captured in Hanano in Aleppo and had “killed a demonstrator.”

Rebel fighters and Syrian troops have been massing in the city of Aleppo for a major battle that sources said could come as early as Friday or Saturday.

The two sides have already been battling in part of the city, including the southern Salaheddin neighbourhood.

Russia just helped the Assad regime accomplish 'in a few days what it had failed to do over 3 years'

(Abdalrhman Ismail/Reuters)
Residents inspect damage after airstrikes by pro-Syrian government forces in the rebel held Al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria on February 4, 2016.

Over the past week, the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad seized several villages north of Aleppo, the country’s largest city and one of the last remaining strongholds of Syria’s non-jihadist rebels, in a development that threatens to escalate the horrors of the Syrian civil war.

Thanks to heavy Russian air support, the regime “succeed[ed] in a few days in what it had failed to do for over three years,” according to an Atlantic Council analysis by Faysal Itani and Hossam Abouzahr. It severed rebel supply lines into Turkey and threatens to encircle the remaining opposition-held territory. 

Aleppo was always a checkerboard of military forces, divided between regime, opposition, and jihadist zones. No one camp has had the ability to fully control a city that had a pre-war population of more than 2 million.

As it is, the Assad regime has suffered from manpower and budgetary shortages. And Assad’s Iranian allies have taken substantial losses of their own, including several high-ranking Revolutionary Guards Corps officers. Meanwhile, Hezbollah, Iran’s proxy force in neighboring Lebanon, may have had one-third of its fighters killed or injured in Syria.

But the regime is making progress even amid this ambiguous ground-level situation. And a humanitarian catastrophe might be in the offing:

#BREAKINGNEWS#ALEPPO IS CUT OFF FROM ITS LIFELINE TO #TURKEY
CLOSE TO A MILLION CIVILIANS ARE DOOMED.#Syria pic.twitter.com/sGKVJJwIE1

— Julian Röpcke (@JulianRoepcke)

February 3, 2016

In recent days, thousands of people have reportedly fled Aleppo. Video posted on social media has shown civilians streaming out of the city:

Civilians fleeing #Aleppo after #Assad’s Iranian and Russian backed loyalists look to set siege to it. #SawaAlAssad pic.twitter.com/HIcyI7ot7l

— Mr. Green (@Mario_Greenly)

February 4, 2016

Reuters put the exodus in the “tens of thousands,” citing an opposition source claiming that Russian aircraft had carried out 250 strikes around the city in the span of a single day.

The Assad regime is now in a position where it could try to recapture the city. Itani and Abouzahr said they believe Assad could decide to “freeze the Aleppo city frontlines” and refocus on other pockets of non-jihadist resistance as part of a larger strategy of “isolating the opposition into manageable pockets and dealing with each individually.”

As Aron Lund, editor of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Syria in Crisis website, explained to Business Insider, the Assad regime isn’t in immediate danger of recapturing the country’s largest city — although its battlefield tactics would be highly destructive.

“I imagine a government reconquest of Aleppo would be a slow process involving both military assaults and bombings, siege tactics and pressure on the civilian population, and, ultimately, political deals with those factions willing to bargain,” Lund told Business Insider in an email, adding that it’s conceivable it could take the regime “many years” to fully retake the city.

(Thomson Reuters)
Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad is seen during an interview in Damascus

But Assad might not even need to conquer Aleppo to achieve its most important battlefield objective: crushing the country’s non-jihadist resistance, leaving western powers without an anti-regime force they can support and cornering the international community into a de-facto alliance with his regime.

“If the government manages to retake and secure eastern Aleppo, which is still a big if, I think the rebels are pretty much out of the game — as long as the government itself remains in the game,” Lund said. A rebel defeat in the city "would presumably have a devastating effect on international and Syrian confidence in the rebels’ ability to win the war or even wring real concessions from Assad,“ he added.

A regime victory in Aleppo could be the final defeat to any remaining US or Western strategy of propping the country’s non-jihadist opposition groups.

”I can’t imagine that anyone seeing Aleppo slip out of rebel hands after these past four horrifying years would just say, well, bad luck, let’s send some more guns into Syria and have another go at it,“ Lund told Business Insider.

(Reuters)
Fighters loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad celebrate with residents of Nubul and al-Zahraa after breaking the siege of their towns, northern Aleppo countryside, Syria, in this handout picture provided by SANA, the Syrian state-run media organization, on February 4, 2016.

The regime’s Aleppo encirclement motions toward what once seemed to be an unthinkable endgame in Syria: the permanent partition of the country between regime and jihadist-held spheres, with Assad as the country’s most seemingly viable source of long-term authority and no remaining force committed to the idea of Syria as a unified or coherent national entity.

But it would be a mistake to think of such a scenario as an "endgame." Even if Assad prevails in Aleppo, his regime will still be fundamentally weak and almost totally dependent on the direct military support of outside powers. A possible rebel defeat might also work to the advantage of jihadist groups like Jabhat al-Nusra and ISIS, which are still committed to fighting the Syrian regime, and which continue to control substantial territory.

The regime has had moments of relative strength and impending collapse throughout a now four-plus-year-long conflict — none of which have made the Syrian civil war any shorter or less deadly.

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Russia says U.S. Planes Bombed Syria's Aleppo on Wednesday, not Russian

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Stalls are seen on a street beside damaged buildings in the rebel held al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria, February 10, 2016. REUTERS/Abdalrhman Ismail

Russia’s Defence Ministry said on Thursday that the shelling of the Syrian city of Aleppo on Wednesday Feb. 10 was carried out by two U.S. aircraft and that Russian planes had not been operating in the area.

A Pentagon spokesman had blamed…

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World News Briefs -- February 11, 2016

World News Briefs — February 11, 2016

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World News Briefs — February 11, 2016 Stalls are seen on a street beside damaged buildings in the rebel held al-Shaar neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria, February 10, 2016. REUTERS/ABDALRHMAN ISMAIL The Guardian: Report on Syria conflict finds 11.5% of population killed or injuredExclusive Syrian Centre for Policy Research says 470,000 deaths is twice UN’s figure with ‘human development ruined’ after…

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Mais de 500 pessoas morreram em Aleppo em ofensiva do regime sírio

Mais de 500 pessoas morreram em Aleppo em ofensiva do regime sírio

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[ad_1] Regime iniciou ofensiva em 1º de fevereiro com apoio da aviação russa.23 crianças estão entre os mortos. Barracas são vistas nesta quarta-feira (10) ao lado de prédio destruído no bairro de al-Shaar, ocupado por rebeldes, em Aleppo (Foto: REUTERS/Abdalrhman Ismail) Aleppo, Síria Mais de 500 pessoas, entre elas dezenas de civis, morreram desde o início em 1º de fevereiro da ofensiva do…

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