shaar

SYRIA. Aleppo governorate. Aleppo. March 9, 2017. Mohammed Mohiedin Anis, or Abu Omar, 70, smokes his pipe as he sits in his destroyed bedroom, listening to music on his hand-cranked gramophone in the city’s formerly rebel-held al-Shaar neighbourhood. Anis had recently returned to Aleppo, with plans to rebuild not only his home, but his large collection of vintage American cars, despite everything being reduced to wreckage and rubble. When reporters asked him about the gramophone, he responded “I will play it for you, but first, I have to light my pipe. Because I never listen to music without it.”

Photograph: Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty

Gunaah ka bhoj jo gardaan pai hum utaa ke chale

Khuda ke ahge khijalat se, sar jhuka ke chale

Milla jinay unay ustaad-e-gi se aauj mila

Unhi nay khayi hai tauhkar, jo sar uta ke chale

Anees, daam ka bharoosa nahi, tehr jao

Chiraag laykay kahan samne hawa ke chale?

— Mir Anees

SYRIA. Aleppo governorate. Aleppo. September 27, 2016. White Helmets hand the body of a girl down to civilians on the ground after she was pulled from rubble of a building following airstrikes on the then rebel-held neighbourhood of al-Shaar.

Photograph: Karam Al-Masri/AFP/Getty Images

What was the relationship between Sephardim and Ashkenazim on the West Coast?

By Leora Singer, Former Research Intern

This is my second blog post in a series of three posts in which I discuss the theme of Sephardim in the West Coast in the 19th-20th century. You can see my first post here. In this post, I compare and contrast the relationship between Ashkenazim and Sephardim in Seattle and San Francisco.

Seattle:

When Calvo and Policar (the first two Sephardim in Seattle) first encountered the Orthodox Ashkenazi Jews living in the city, they weren’t exactly welcomed with open arms. These observant Jews didn’t believe that Policar and Calvo were “real Jews” because they spoke Greek instead of Yiddish (Adatto, 56), and their names didn’t “sound Jewish” (Angel, 553). Because they felt ostracized by the Jewish community, Calvo and Policar spent a lot of time with Greek non-Jews living in Seattle (Adatto, 58). Fortunately, the rabbi of Bikur Holim, an Orthodox synagogue, convinced the Orthodox Ashkenazim that the Sephardim were just as observant as they were. The Ashkenazim accepted Calvo and Policar as members of the Jewish people.

The Seattle Sephardic community kept growing as Calvo and Policar brought family members over, and these family members spread the word about the opportunities available in Seattle (Adatto, 60). In 1904, the first Rhodesli Sephardic immigrant came to Seattle (FitzMorris, 29). As the number of Sephardim in Seattle grew, their ties to the overall Jewish community of Seattle grew. Many Sephardim prayed at Bikur Holim. They felt somewhat connected to the Orthodox Ashkenazim because they, like the Sephardim, upheld high religious standards (Adatto, 116). However, the perception was that their cultures were just too different to mix together, so the Sephardim and Orthodox Ashkenazim remained fairly separate. For example, intermarriage between the two groups was highly rare (Adatto, 117).

Despite its rocky nature, the beginning of the relationship between Orthodox Sephardim and Orthodox Ashkenazim was still stronger than the beginning of the relationship between Sephardim and Reform Ashkenazim. The Sephardim distrusted the Reform Ashkenazim because they believed that the Reform Ashkenazim were not following enough of the Jewish traditions. Fortunately, Aubrey Levy from the Reform Temple de Hirsch helped to change this negative view of Reform Judaism by forming a friendship with the Sephardic Jews. As a lawyer, he helped Sephardim with legal work, free of charge. For example, in 1914, he assisted them with the legal logistics in the purchase of the (previously Ashkenazi-owned) Bikur Holim synagogue (Adatto, 118-119). Levy was highly regarded by the Sephardim. By association, his synagogue became highly regarded as well. In fact, many Sephardic children got their Jewish education at the Hebrew School of Temple de Hirsch. However, even after many years, there was still very little intermarriage. The Sephardim still did not feel like a part of Ashkenazi culture.

San Francisco:

There was a temporary Sephardic congregation in the early 1850s (Zerin, 30). The congregation was called Shaar Hashamayim. It was so temporary that it never even had a building because the congregation stopped meeting only a few months after its creation (Zerin, 47). This is likely because the construction of new buildings for two Ashkenazi-run synagogues, Temple Emanu-El and Temple Sherith- Israel, was underway. Since the Sephardim and Ashkenazim in San Francisco were united, (especially in comparison to these sects in other West Coast cities) the Sephardim didn’t want to divide it by having their own synagogue. Also, some members of the Sephardic congregation had been leaders in the other synagogues, because they were so prominent and respected by the Ashkenazim (Stern and Kramer, 47).

Sephardim from San Francisco are sometimes difficult to identify because intermarriage with Ashkenazim and even non-Jews was common (Stern and Kramer, 45). This practice showed a stark difference between the Jews of San Francisco and in other West Coast cities. In the other cities, intermarriage between pretty much anyone that was not a Jew from your home country was frowned upon.

Bibliography:

Adatto, Albert. Sephardim and the Seattle Sephardic Community. Seattle: U of Washington, 1939. Print.

Angel, Marc D., Hasson, Aron, Kramer, William M., Maimon, Isaac, Samuels, Beth, Sidell, Loraine, Stern, Norton B. Sephardic Jews in the West Coast States : An Anthology. 1st ed. Los Angeles: Published for the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles by the Western States Jewish History Association, 1996. Print. Western States Jewish History ; v. 28, No. 1-3.

Stern, Stephen. The Sephardic Jewish Community of Los Angeles. New York: Arno, 1980. Print. Folklore of the World (New York).

Zerin, Edward. Jewish San Francisco. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2006. Print. Images of America

Shaar HaShamaim Synagogue in Belem, Brazil, 1984. Photo by Abraham Amzalak. 

“Shaar Hashamaim” in Hebrew, “Porta do Ceu” in Portuguese, or “Gate of Heaven” in English, is the name of the first synagogue established by the Sephardi Jews who immigrated from Morocco to Brazil in the 19th century. The blue and white two storied structure was built in Colonial style in 1824 by Judah Eliezer Levy.

Shaar oil field back with the Syrian Army soon

Official Syrian news channels just announced that the Syrian Army was able to regain control of most of Al Shaar oil field that the ISIS attacked and seized control over it few days ago.

Getting back this oil field is very important to the Syrian people as it feeds most of the electricity stations that supply Homs and Damascus.

Soon it will back to the Syrians and the blackouts will stop 

Sons of the father
Damian, Skaar and Daken …..sons of three of the most well known heroes in comic industry ( Batman, Hulk and Wolverine respectively). Are they destined to rule the earth after their fathers have died? will they take up the mantle and fight the good fight? or will they try to tear down want their fathers have tried so hard up hold any chance they get? 

At this point Damian is trying to do the right thing somewhat by becoming Robin and assisting in his father’s crusade against crime. However he still has that assassin’s mentality and would kill where his father would not. 

Daken has proven that he is the total opposite to Wolverine and he is willing to do what it takes to end his father. No father/son bonding has gotten through to him but his goals are clear, destroy his father and build an empire unheard of. 

Skaar came to earth to kill his father for the death of his mother and the destruction caused on his home world. Giving the chance and the resources Skaar would have destroyed the earth to achieve his goals however he has taken to the side of good (for now).

These three are just examples of the children some heroes produce that can make this world a better place or bring it to it’s knees.




Great Rift Portals

The gold dwarves in the Shaar have numerous portals in and around the Great Rift to defend and simplify their lives.

Most of these portals were created centuries ago, and unlike portals in human lands, most are still known. The long memories of the gold dwarves don’t leave them prone to leaving “lost" portals lying around.

Since dwarves are a civic-minded race, they are known to put their greatest powers into defensive fortification.

Their use of portals in this way is no exception.

SYRIA, ALEPPO : Syrian girls, carrying school bags provided by UNICEF, walk past the rubble of destroyed buildings on their way home from school on March 7, 2015 in al-Shaar neighbourhood, in the rebel-held side of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo. Heavy fighting shook the Syrian city of Aleppo on march 6, 2015 as the exiled opposition chief said for the first time that President Bashar al-Assad’s ouster need not be a pre-condition for peace talks.    AFP PHOTO / AMC / ZEIN AL-RIFAI